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Full text of "Town Report"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/townreport1992linc 



Cover - Drawing by 

Andrew Frost 
Third Grade 
Hartwell School 



REPORT 



of the 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 



of the 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



FOR THE YEAR 1992 




LINCOLN, MASSACHUSETTS 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 



TOWN CALENDAR 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Board of Selectmen 1 

Officers and Committees 12 

Town Clerk 26 

FINANCE 

Town Treasurer 58 

Town Accountant 61 

Board of Assessors 69 

Collector of Taxes 72 

PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 

Fire & Police Departments 74 

Inspectors of Building, Wiring & Plumbing 77 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 79 

HEALTH AND WELFARE 

Board of Health 80 

Council on Aging 85 

Minuteraan Home Care 86 

Dog Officer 87 

North East Solid Waste Committee 88 

Recycling Committee 91 

PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 

Planning Board 93 

Board of Appeals 96 

Conservation Commission 99 

Lincoln Land Conservation Trust 104 

Housing Commission 108 

Water Commissioners 110 

Public Works 112 

Pierce Property Committee 113 

Cemetery Commissioners 114 



Historic District Commission 117 

Route 128 Area Committee 118 

Bemis Hall Advisory Committee 119 

Codman Community Farms 120 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 124 

Personnel Board 125 

LIBRARY, RECREATION AND SCHOOLS 

Lincoln Public Library 126 

DeCordova Museum & Park 137 

Lincoln Cultural Council 143 

Recreation Committee 145 

Celebrations Committee 146 

Matadepera Exchange Committee 148 

Bemis Lecture Trustees 149 

Elementary School Committee 150 

School Building Committee 158 

Lincoln-Sudbury Regional School Committee 161 

Lincoln Scholarship Committee 175 
Lincoln-Sudbury Regional Scholarship Fund Committee 176 

Minuteman Regional Vocational Technical School 179 

STATISTICAL INFORMATION 

Commissioners of Trust Funds 187 

Valuation List 203 



TOWN CALENDAR 



SELECTMEN 

LINCOLN SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
BOARD OF ASSESSORS 
BOARD OF HEALTH 
PLANNING BOARD 
CONSERVATION COMMISSION 
HOUSING COMMISSION 

OTHER COMMITTEES 

POPULATION 
TOWN AREA 
1991-92 TAX RATE 
ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

ANNUAL ELECTION OF OFFICERS 

QUALIFICATIONS FOR 
REGISTRATION 

REGISTERED VOTERS 

TOWN OFFICES 



Every Monday evening, 7:30 p.m., 
Town Offices Building, 259-8850 

Every other Monday evening, 7:30 p.m., 
Superintendent's Office, 259-9400 

For appointments, call Town Offices 
Building, 259-8850 

First Monday evening of each month, 
7:30 p.m., Town Offices Building 

Every other Wednesday evening, 
8:00 p.m., Town Offices Building 

First & third Wednesdays of each 
month, 7:30 p.m., Town Offices Building 

Second and fourth Monday evenings of 
each month, 7:30 p.m., Town Offices 
Building 

See bulletin board, Town Offices 
Building 

5,017 (Town Census) 

14.56 square miles 

$12.68 

March 27, 1993 

(Saturday before last Monday in March) 

March 29, 1993 

(Last Monday in March) 



Residence in Town of Lincoln 

3,559 (As of November 1992) 

Open Monday through Friday, 

8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. (Closed Saturdays) 

Telephone 259-8850 (All departments) 



General Government 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Robert L. DeNormandie 

Harriet B. Todd 

Katherine S. Mcliigh, Chairman 

1992 was a very busy year for the Board of Selectmen with 
challenges from both familiar subjects and new ones. For the first 
time since the passage of Proposition 2 1/2 an override request by 
the Board of Selectmen failed at the ballot box, albeit by only six 
votes. After cutting budgets and services significantly to reach 
that point, further cuts were necessary to reach a no override budget 
under which we are now operating. 

The School Building Committee's continued work appeared on nearly 
every Monday night Selectmen's agenda to keep us up to date on 
Committee activities. We continue to work for a fiscally responsible 
plan which meets educational needs to be brought to the Town for its 
consideration. 

Our relationship with our regional trash facility NESWC, along 

with state mandated and local recycling efforts, occupied a 

significant amount of our time, making waste management our second 
most frequent topic of discussion. 

Despite ongoing efforts throughout the year, a new baseball field 
for the Town is not yet agreed to as of this writing. We are hopeful 
we will be able to bring a compromise plan to the Town for its 
consideration at the 1993 Annual Town Meeting. 

One bright spot in our year was our success, with the help of an 
interested and active ad hoc committee, in keeping the Lincoln Center 
Post Office open with more limited hours, after the United States 
Postal Service had threatened its closure as a cost saving measure. 

We were pleased to find that, as a result of the 1990 census, we 
were able to return to voting as a one precinct town again, only to 
discover that some last minute gerrymandering at the state level left 
77 families in the Fifth Congressional District while placing the 
balance of the Town's voters in the Seventh Congressional District. 
Through the creativity of our Town Clerk, Nancy Zuelke, we were able 
to remain a one precinct town with special arrangements made for 
voters in the Fifth District. While having two Congressional 
representatives can expand our voice at the federal level, it makes 
for difficult logistics in the development of practical working 
relationships. 



TOWN DEPARTMENTS AND SERVICES 

Because of budget constraints, the Selectmen proposed reductions 
in the Town Office staff for FY93. We were sorry to lose Jeanne 
Survell, the loss of whose position meant that many members of the 
Town Offices staff were required to readjust their workloads to give 
them a half day per week to cover the switchboard and front office 
duties. All personnel and Boards whose staff were affected have 
responded with willingness, understanding, and extra effort so that 
citizens have been minimally affected by the change. In addition, we 
lost Bob O'Brien, who had been the part-time custodian at Bemis 
Hall. His duties were assumed by Joe Mannarino, the Town Offices 
custodian and jack of all trades. 

Another change brought on by the same fiscal constraints was the 
need for increased cooperation between the Department of Public Works 
(DPW) and Conservation Land Management. We lost Scott Mooney, 
Conservation Land Technician and tree expert. Mike Murphy, the 
Conservation Land Manager, now uses DPW personnel to help carry out 
his land management responsibilities using coordinated scheduling. 
All indications at this point are that the new system is working 
well, without a significant loss of service in either area. 

We are proud of the willingness of all Town employees to learn 
new jobs and try new ways of accomplishing their work in an effort to 
deliver the Town's service in the most productive and most cost 
effective manner possible. This cooperative spirit which pervades 
the staff is a cornerstone of the ability of the Selectmen to effect 
changes such as the ones which occurred this year. 

Another example of this cooperative spirit came in connection 
with the implementation and completion of Boston Edison's ENCORE 
program to replace light fixtures throughout the Town and Schools 
with more energy efficient ones at no cost to the Town. Bob Budds, 
Plant Manager for the School Department, willingly oversaw the 
implementation of the program townwide since it occurred while our 
Building Superintendent, Ernie Johnson, was out due to serious 
illness. The program will save the Town and Schools an estimated 
$17,000 in annual energy costs. 

Hard work and perseverance resulted this year in the signing with 
the State Department of Environmental Protection of a waiver 
agreement which will prevent Lincoln from being required by the State 
to build a filtration plant for its water at a cost estimated at 
several million dollars. The waiver agreement calls for Lincoln to 
construct a contact chamber to insure that Town water has sufficient 
time in contact with required disinfectants, and efforts are underway 
to identify a location and proceed with plans for this much less 
costly alternative. Pat Allen, Frank Emmons, and Dave Ramsay deserve 
the thanks of all water-using residents of the Town for their efforts 
which resulted in this major accomplishment for the Town. 



This year, as a follow-up to the report issued by the Selectmen 
in 1991 following a tragic drowning in Flint's Pond, the Selectmen 
continued carrying out the recommendations contained in the report. 
Last year all points at which emergency motor vehicles can gain 
access to conservation trails were identified and marked, and 
specially marked trail maps included in all public safety vehicles. 
This year an emergency drill was conducted to test the new system in 
September, where Selectmen acted as both "victim" and "companion". 
The exercise was very successful with a prompt rescue using the new 
trail maps combined with eventual voice contact. Included in the 
drill was use of the revamped resource file by the dispatcher to make 
contact with regional and mutual aid resources which might prove 
vital in a real emergency. Other drills under varied conditions are 
being contemplated. Also completed was improved "No Trespassing" 
signage at Flint's Pond and implementation of a program permitting 
fines for violations. In addition, Lincoln formally joined Regional 
Fire District 14 with which it has been working informally for 
several years on regional public safety concerns. During 1992, 911 
emergency telephone service was instituted in Lincoln as well, to 
provide upgraded emergency service while waiting for the statewide 
implementation of E911 service, which was approved at the Annual Town 
Meeting in March. Additional work in the area of public safety 
included a special EMT drill in which a Life Flight helicopter landed 
behind Town Offices, much to the consternation of our neighbors. 
Also, this year marked the retirement of Ray Barnes after 16 years as 
Lincoln's regular Police and Fire Dispatcher. We wish him well in 
his retirement. 

Lincoln received two awards this year from statewide 
organizations which work with municipalities. First, Lincoln was a 
runner-up for the Department of Environmental Protection/North East 
Rural Water Association 1992 Public Water System Award, Medium 
Community System Category for Outstanding Performance and Achievement 
in 1991 for consistently providing a quality water supply. Lincoln 
also received the award for best Overall Safety Performance in the 
property and liability area for towns with populations under 7,500 
from the Massachusetts Interlocal Insurance Association. These 
awards are not accidental but the result of system wide concern for 
safety and care in the conduct of the work of the Town by its 
employees, which is reinforced daily by department heads. 

This year, the Selectmen decided to conduct an expanded review of 
the Executive Secretary to include those who work most closely with 
him. The results showed that 6 year veteran Dave Ramsay is well 
respected for his attention to detail, his thoroughness, and his 
dedication and leadership. 

Two events marked the year on the roads and byways of Lincoln. 
The first was a major two train wreck at the Tower Road crossing in 
February. This disaster put our Public Safety Department and our 
mutual aid agreements to the test. We received a very prompt 
response from several communities, including a full blown Hazardous 



Materials response from Hanscom Air Force Base. Chief Arena was 
pleased with the level and quality of the response and the speed with 
which the potential disaster was brought under control. The second 
was a particularly pernicious winter storm in December, which, 
despite an outstanding early response by the Highway Department, 
resulted in the worst road conditions in local memory. Our 
investigation following the storm disclosed that the road conditions 
were a direct consequence of the Selectmen's longstanding minimum 
salt policy combined with the particular conditions encountered in 
this storm. This, spurred by vociferous complaints by some 
residents, has prompted the Selectmen to undertake an evaluation of 
the salting policy to determine if more flexibility can be 
incorporated into the policy to prevent future recurrence of the 
conditions this storm produced without adversely affecting the 
environment. 

WASTE MANAGEMENT 

The one aspect of Town services which occupied more agenda time 
than any other was waste management. We believe this is a harbinger 
of the attention communities will need to devote to this growing 
municipal burden in the future. 

The best news in this area was the completion in 1992 of the land 
swap at the Transfer Station with the National Park Service, which 
gives us a 20 year easement over the road to the transfer station 
and, thankfully, the right finally to pave it, which was done in the 
fall. 

To insure that use of the transfer station is limited to Town 
residents, the Selectmen, at the suggestion of the Recycling 
Committee, revived a sticker program for transfer station users. 
Also, this year saw the retirement of longtime employee Ed Rochinsky, 
who had been exclusively responsible for the transfer station 
operation. His position was not filled, and a slight change in the 
operating hours resulted from the need to staff the operation with 
employees working regular Highway Department hours. 

NESWC (North East Solid Waste Consortium), the trash to energy 
plant to which Lincoln belongs, appeared on the Selectmen's agenda on 
a very regular basis this year. This year NESWC voted to permit 
towns to apply for permanent readjustment of their guaranteed annual 
tonnage, and Lincoln submitted a 20% reduction request. However, the 
NESWC Board subsequently put the action on hold indefinitely. In any 
case, as a result of a poor economy and increased recycling, all 
communities are delivering less trash to NESWC, creating greater 
operating losses, which the communities must pay for under their 20 
year contract with the facility. 

NESWC s relations with the plant operator were strained from the 
outset, resulting eventually in a major lawsuit which has been in 
arbitration for several years. In late November, the arbitrators 



finally made their award of $18 million dollars against NESWC, a 
fraction of the claims being made by the operator and generally 
regarded by NESWC communities as a positive outcome. Lincoln* s share 
of the award is $80,000 and payment after December 31 would have 
resulted in substantial interest expense. Because of Lincoln's 
prudent fiscal management, the Town was able to make the payment 
without borrowing and will seek Town Meeting approval in 1993 for 
reimbursement . 

Debt service on the bonds to build the NESWC plant constitute the 
bulk of the expense carried by the operation. Poor economic 
conditions have created a favorable environment for the issuance of 
bonds, and NESWC, at the urging of Lincoln's longtime representative 
Henry Rugo (also NESWC 's Treasurer and a member of its Executive 
Committee), has arranged for the refinancing of the bonds, which is 
set to occur in early January. This could reduce the annual cost of 
NESWC by as much as $20 million dollars, which will prevent the 
tipping fees from rising as rapidly as they would otherwise because 
of other losses in the operation. This has been a very long and 
complicated process in which Henry Rugo has kept us advised, and has 
sought our support and intervention from time to time. 

Finally, Jerry Hopcroft, NESWC 's able Executive Director since 
inception, resigned this fall. The Executive Committee Chairman is 
currently serving as interim Executive Director, and Henry Rugo has 
resigned as Treasurer and is seeking to be replaced as Lincoln's 
representative. He has devoted a good bit of his time to this 
important job for Lincoln, and the Selectmen have worked hard to find 
a replacement with the skill and dedication Henry has shown over the 
past 11 years. 

Another waste management subject which appeared frequently on our 
agenda was recycling. The Selectmen learned this fall that Lincoln 
has been awarded a grant from the state to purchase two roll-off 
containers to assist in its recycling program. This will save 
Lincoln the cost of renting these bins which hold the recycled goods 
at the transfer station. In addition, the Selectmen are 
contemplating including a warrant article in March 1993 for the 
purchase of a truck, which would be used by the Town to do its own 
hauling of both trash and recycled goods. This would greatly aid the 
recycling program and, when combined with savings from both recycling 
hauling and trash hauling, would pay for itself in just a few years. 

Poor quality of glass has caused our glass to be rejected by the 
recycler more than once during 1993, requiring us to dispose of it at 
NESWC, and has drawn the attention of the Selectmen and the Recycling 
Committee. As a result, the Selectmen have implemented a quality 
control program for glass recycling, consisting of employees 
monitoring glass quality during the week to insure that all caps, 
rings, and metal sleeves have been removed. On weekends because of 
increased volume, the Selectmen asked the Recycling Committee to 



implement a program using volunteers to monitor glass recycling. The 
response from local organizations has resulted in glass recycling 
being available one Saturday per month, in addition to the regular 
weekday hours. The Selectmen continue to look for ways to improve 
and expand the volunteer program. 

The state has passed a law banning certain materials from regular 
disposal with trash, which is set for implementation on April 1, 
1993. The Selectmen will be following state guidelines and 
implementing a citizen education program to prepare for this new 
law. Also, the Selectmen have tried to keep up to date on what is 
going on regionally, since this may provide a viable long-term 
recycling alternative. The League recycling study has kept us 
informed about an alternative known as the Millis Consortium. Other 
alternatives being explored include MRF's (Multiple Recycling 
Facilities) which accept all types of recycled goods at one location, 
and private companies offering comprehensive recycling services. The 
Selectmen are continuing to try to offer Lincoln residents the most 
cost effective and environmentally sound waste management program 
possible. 

FISCAL CONCERNS 



The most important fiscal event of 1992 was the failure for the 
first time since the passage of Proposition 2 1/2 of the override 
requested by the Board of Selectmen. The Selectmen, after making 
substantial service and budget cuts and with the support of the 
Finance Committee, requested an override of $520,000 for FY93, which 
would have resulted in a 9% tax increase. This included an amount 
devoted to a stabilization fund, setting aside savings from a decline 
in the Town's annual debt service payments for future capital 
projects contemplated by the Town, such as necessary improvements at 
both the schools and the public safety building. This override was 
defeated by 6 votes at the polls, although the budget had passed at 
Town Meeting. A second override of half that amount also failed by a 
larger margin, and a final no override budget was arrived at in the 
late spring, which contained no stabilization fund. The Selectmen 
have taken very seriously the message of the failed override and 
worked hard this year to develop for presentation an operating budget 
which contains only a modest inflationary increase and would fit 
within a no override scenario. Town government and services remain 
at their current limited level, and expansion in the near future is 
unlikely. 

A silver lining in the overwhelming extra workload generated by, 
the need to prepare for three Town Meetings last spring was the open 
discussion in their aftermath about how to structure any future 
override votes, should they become necessary, so as to avoid the 
plethora of Town Meetings which characterized our spring. 

A second benefit which flowed from the discussions about the 
trimming of the budgets was extended discussion about and increased 



understanding of free cash. Many citizens came to understand the 
sources and uses of free cash for the first time, and the Selectmen, 
in conjunction with other Boards, developed and implemented a written 
free cash policy to guide future discussion and planning for free 
cash expenditures. Free cash amounts have increased in recent years, 
making such a formal policy a necessary part of good fiscal planning. 

The School Building Committee's work to prepare a plan for school 
renovations was the most frequent agenda item this year, appearing on 
almost a weekly basis throughout the year. The Selectmen have worked 
closely with the School Building Committee throughout the year to 
develop and prepare a plan which meets educational goals and is 
fiscally responsible, and hope such a plan can be ready for 
presentation at the March 1993 Town Meeting. 

One of our contributions to the school building process included 
the preparation and approval of a long range capital plan for the 
Town. This plan identified two major capital projects which will 
require bonding to accomplish - the school renovations and 
improvements to the public safety building which is poorly designed 
for today's demands, in parts unusable because of improper 
ventilation under current standards, and run down. The balance of 
the anticipated capital expenditures fit into a planned program of 
warrant articles which can be accomplished within the Town's annual 
budget. They include replacement of major pieces of equipment, such 
as fire trucks, public works vehicles and equipment, road 
improvements, and the like. 

The Selectmen this year attempted to implement a PILOT Program 
(Payment in Lieu of Taxes) in Lincoln. The Town has many non-profit 
institutions which contribute to the richness and diversity of our 
community but do not contribute, for the most part, to the revenue 
base. The Carroll School has been making a modest payment in lieu of 
taxes for many years, and the result of the Selectmen's efforts this 
year was the addition of Bunsai Gakuen to the list of contributors, 
with a modest one-time payment. Many other organizations expressed 
sympathy for the plight of the Town, but pleaded their own straitened 
financial circumstances. 

In response to community interest in the subject, the Selectmen 
gave fuller consideration this year to the question of whether or not 
we should split Lincoln's tax rate to place a heavier share of the 
property tax burden on commercial and personal property than on 
residential property. Although initially the Selectmen felt that a 
minor shift of 10% to 20% might make sense to relieve some of the 
residential burden, the Board ultimately decided not to make the 
shift this year because the failed override meant that residential 
taxpayers were not facing the 9% tax increase which had been 
anticipated at the time of the earlier discussion. This matter is 
reviewed and decided anew each year by the Board of Selectmen. 

Finally, as a continuation of the Board's longstanding concern 
over the escalating costs of the Town's share of health care 



insurance for Town employees, the Board this year decided to begin 
the statutory process to consider a change in insurance plans in an 
effort to identify an alternate reputable carrier at a lower cost. 
The statutory process involves the formation of a committee comprised 
of representatives of all employee groups in Town. They are 
currently reviewing proposals, and we hope they will have a 
recommendation for the Selectmen's consideration in 1993. 

REGIONAL ISSUES AND TRAFFIC 

As usual, activities in this area were numerous and diverse. The 
federal Wild and Scenic River Study Committee for the Concord, 
Assabet, and Sudbury Rivers was formed and approved by the Secretary 
of the Interior and has been hard at work all year with two Lincoln 
residents participating - Lincoln's representative Peter Sprayregen 
and Joan Kimball as the Governor's representative. This Committee 
will study the river system and decide if designation as a Wild and 
Scenic River should be sought from the federal government. Such 
designation would give the river system special environmental and 
regulatory protection. 

A new development near the Winter Street/Old County Road 
intersection reactivated the Route 128 Area Committee which had 
worked on the Bay Colony development and the widening of Old County 
Road. A small portion of this proposed development is within Lincoln 
and the balance is in Waltham. This Committee has worked very hard 
with the developers and reached an acceptable solution which, if 
approved by all the affected boards in both communities, as well as 
by the County Commissioners, will result in the permanent closing of 
a section of Old County Road not currently in use, to provide some 
real and permanent protection for residents of that area against 
encroachment by regional traffic. 

After several years on the drawing boards, the Cambridge 
Watershed Advisory Committee was finally formed and is meeting on a I 
regular basis. It is comprised of representatives of the Selectmen, 
Planning Board, and Conservation Commission of all towns bordering 
the Cambridge Watershed to work cooperatively for the protection of 
the watershed. It provides us with a much needed opportunity to work 
cooperatively with the City of Waltham with whom we have not always 
had good relations. 

The Board appointed a new representative this year to the Hanscoo 
Field Advisory Commission, Jim Hogan, who has become Chair of the 
Commission. The many issues related to air traffic and Massport 
operations are dealt with by this group of representatives from 
neighboring communities and users of the airfield. Both the 
Commission and the HATS group have been following closely Massport 's. 
Part 150 Noise Study at the airfield, which will establish baseline! 
noise levels affecting future development at the airfield in 
significant ways. 

The intersection upgrade of Bedford Road and Route 2 was 



completed in the fall with unprecedented cooperation among the state 
and federal highway departments, the Town and neighboring residents. 
The result is improved safety at the intersection and very attractive 
landscaping to minimize the impact of the changes on the residents 
closest to the intersection. Safety improvements will be moving 
westward, and the Selectmen have joined a Corridor Advisory Committee 
of the MAGIC subregion of MAPC, which will be working with the state 
on Route 2 upgrades west of Bedford Road and particularly at Crosby's 
Corner, which has long been one of the most hazardous intersections 
in Massachusetts. Several serious accidents occur there every year, 
and this year was no exception. Short-term upgrades are planned for 
1993 with planning now underway for a longer term solution, which 
will include a flyover for through traffic. 

Finally, the Selectmen and the Selectmen's Office have continued 
to follow possibilities for regionalization of Town functions and 
services as a possible cost saving measure. Harriet Todd and Dave 
Ramsay attended a local region conference on this subject this year, 
and the Selectmen's Office will stay in close touch with neighboring 
communities to learn if and when any of them may be interested in 
exploring local regionalization options for town services. 

HOUSING 



Because of concern about a recent trend of low occupancy at the 

Codman Farmhouse, which provides a cooperative living opportunity for 

four elderly moderate income residents, the Town Meeting this year 

approved a broadened scope of permitted uses for the Farmhouse, 

should a change in use become necessary. However, no changes 

| actually went into effect since this spring additional suitable 

j applicants for the elderly cooperative were approved by the Housing 

| Commission. 

With the authority of Town Meeting including amendments made on 
1 the floor, our Housing Authority legislation was refiled this year. 
| It passed the House but died in the Senate rush to prorogation at the 
j end of the legislative year and will have to be refiled next year. 

The Selectmen and Housing Commission continued to work with EOCD 
I to attempt to obtain the approvals necessary to proceed to the 
I completion of Phase III of the Battle Road Farm housing development. 
I This is a discussion which has been going on since the spring of 1991 
, ! without resolution, principally because of significant turnover at 
I! the state agency. Discussion includes the perennial question of how 
I Hanscom housing is counted for purposes of evaluating the Town's 
I commitment to affordable housing. The person with whom we are now 
[.working at EOCD has promised the Town a resolution of all these 
I! outstanding matters by March of 1993, which we eagerly await. 

COMMUNITY ACTIVITIES 

In addition to the retention of the Lincoln Center Post Office 
discussed above, the Selectmen were involved directly in many 



activities affecting the community. In one of its most momentous 
decisions of 1992, the Board of Selectmen postponed the Fourth of 
July festivities to the following day due to inclement weather. Our 
July 5th celebration was, however, a resounding success, and many 
residents reported that their rainy Fourth was used productively. 

We were pleased to congratulate Irene Rice on her designation by 
the Governor's Alliance Against Drugs as one of its Drug Fighters of 
the Year for her outstanding work in bringing the DARE Program to 
Lincoln school children and supporting its continuation. 

The Selectmen continued to work with School personnel on a small 
committee to assist with planning for relocation or alternate 
arrangements for day care and after school care, should the 
population explosion in the Lincoln Schools temporarily squeeze them 
out of the space they are currently occupying. The outcome of this 
work will become more clear as the planning for school renovations 
nears completion. 

As reported in the introduction, no solution has yet been found 
for the location and configuration of a new ballfield for Lincoln 
children. During the year, several Boards and Committees researched 
both recreational needs and resources for the Town, and concluded 
that the two most appropriate sites continue to be the School campus 
and the area behind and beside Town Offices. Conservation 
restrictions, topography, or isolation prevented development of most 
sites on conservation land. We continue to work with the Baseball 
Commission, the Historic District Commission and the School Committee 
to reach both a short and a long-term solution to this community need. 

Late in the year we were approached by the Skating Subcommittee 
of the Recreation Committee to approve the construction of a skating 
rink at a location on the school campus. This represents a very 
worthwhile effort, which we support, to create an area for safe 
skating in Lincoln for all residents. However, the siting, design, 
cost, and management of the proposed skating area occupied 
considerable time and energy on the part of representatives of both 
staff and Boards at the Schools, Recreation Department, and 
Selectmen's Office. As of this writing, no final plans have been 
established for skating this winter. But the enthusiasm this 
proposal has generated will insure that, even if it is not feasible 
for this winter, planning will continue so that a safe skating area 
can be provided in the future. 

The Lincoln Minutemen have brought glory to the Town twice in ; 
1992. First, during Sail Boston in the summer, they were invited to 
perform aboard one of the tall ships in Boston Harbor for the 
festivities. Second, they were one of two Massachusetts 
organizations chosen to represent Massachusetts in the parade! 
honoring the inauguration of Bill Clinton as President of the United? 
States in Washington, D.C. 



10 



No discussion of community activities would be complete without 
recognizing and thanking the many volunteers who serve on Town Boards 
and Committees. They are the engine that drives the Town in both 
large and small ways, as you can see from the pages of this report, 
and we are grateful that so many talented and able Lincoln residents 
consider volunteering for the Town to be a part of their membership 
in the community. Retirements and resignations this year included 
Ann Kessen-Lowell and Ken Basset t from the Planning Board; Joe 
Robbat, Lucian Leape, and Bruce Long, from the Finance Committee; 
Mary Helen Lorenz, Rita DiGiovanni, Lynn Donaldson, Mark Deck, and 
Doug Adams from the School Building Committee; Hector Galbraith, 
Claire Cunningham, Nadie Rice and Tom Billings from the Conservation 
Commission; Buzz Constable and Ray Johnson from the Housing 
Commission; Wardell Loatman and Peg Stathos from the Lincoln Cultural 
Council; Harriet Relman, Bemis Trustee; John O'Laughlin, Board of 
Health; Barbara Low, Library Trustee; John Walker, Recreation 
Committee; Sam Donnell, Personnel Board; Ruth Morey, Minuteman Home 
Care; the Townwide Conference Committee, which went out of business; 
Aire-Maija Schwann and Ward Sands from the Council on Aging; Melissa 
Meyer from the Matadepera Committee; and, of course, Warren Flint, 
Jr. from the Board of Selectmen. Warren left the Board of Selectmen, 
capping a career in service to Lincoln which began many years ago 
with his tenure on the Planning Board. Warren has been a steadfast 
voice of reason and compromise in the sometimes heated deliberations 
on the Selectmen's agenda, and will be missed by both his fellow 
Board members and by the Town residents as well. 

Sadly, we must note the passing of several important past 
contributors to the Town who died during the past year. They are 
George Faddoul, Cemetery Commissioner; Jeffrey Mudge, Celebrations 
Committee; Cliff Bowles, Council on Aging; Susie Brooks, Planning 
Board; Kay Bolt, Library Trustee; and David Webster, school teacher 
and Boy Scout leader. Their many years of service to the Town of 
Lincoln provide a living legacy of their public spirit. 

To give the flavor of the variety of subjects which find their 
way onto the plate of the Board of Selectmen, we close with a listing 
of the various pieces of pending legislation at the state and federal 
level upon which the Selectmen have commented during the past year: 
underground storage tank decommissioning, distribution of lottery 
receipts, local aid formulas and amounts, Lincoln Housing Authority 
enabling legislation, local 30B curative legislation, land bank, 
education reform, congressional redistricting, municipal health 
insurance requirements, waste bans and recycling. Like the 
legislation we reviewed, the activities of the Selectmen on Lincoln's 
behalf reflect both breadth and variety. Our object always is to 
provide for Lincoln residents basic municipal services in the most 
efficient and effective manner, to receive our fair share of state 
and regional resources, to contribute to regional solutions wherever 
they make sense for Lincoln, and to urge the state to allow us the 
flexibility to develop and implement our own solutions to local 
problems . 



11 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 



MODERATOR 



Term Expires 



David M. Donaldson 1993 

TOWN CLERK 

Nancy J. Zuelke 1993 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Robert L. DeNormandie 1994 

Katherine S. McHugh, Chairman 1993 

Harriet B. Todd 1995 

TOWN TREASURER 

Roy M. Raja 1993 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Douglas M. Burckett, Chairman 1993 

G. Sargent Janes 1994 

Paul Marsh 1995 

COLLECTOR OF TAXES 

Roy M. Raja 1995 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Maria Churchill 1993 

Henry M. Morgan 1995 

Patricia Salem 1995 

Leslie Vagliano, Chairman 1993 

Agnes C. Wiggin 1994 

WATER COMMISSIONERS 

Leona Champeny 1993 

Gabriel Farrell 1994 

Andrew Hall, Chairman 1995 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

Joan M. Comstock 1994 

Perry Culver, M.D., Chairman 1993 

Magruder C. Donaldson 1995 



12 



Term Expires 

REGIONAL DISTRICT SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

William C. Hewins 1994 

Sarah Cannon Holden, Chairman 1994 

Geraldine C. Nogelo 1995 

Frederick Pryor 1993 

Phyllis Rappaport 1993 

David Wilson 1995 

CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 



Martha DeNormandie 1995 

George P. Faddoul, (Deceased) 1994 

Marjorie Holland, Chairman 1993 

John C. MacLean (Appointed) 1994 

PLANNING BOARD 

Kenneth E. Bassett (Resigned) 1997 

Crawley Cooper (Appointed) 1997 

Margery P. Far an, Chairman 1995 

Ann Kessen- Lowell (Resigned) 1993 

Dilla G. Tingley, Vice Chairman 1994 

Thomas C. Wang (Appointed) 1993 

James B. White 1996 

MEASURER OF WOOD AND BARK 

Douglas Adams 1993 

William Constable 1993 

JoAnne Fraser 1993 



FENCE VIEWER 

Jennifer Donaldson 1993 

Warren Flint, Jr. 1993 

COMMISSIONERS OF TRUST FUNDS 

Virginia M. Niles 1995 

William B. Russell 1993 

Conrad Todd 1994 

TRUSTEES OF BEMIS FUND 

Sara Mattes 1994 

John Curtis Perry 1993 

Irene Weigel 1995 



13 



Term Expires 

TRUSTEES OF LINCOLN LIBRARY 

Craig Hill self-perpetuating 

Don/, Ins Harding j Chairman 

Mary Newman 

Ann Rote (School Committee's Appointee) 1994 

Linda May (Elected by Town) 1995 

Bruce Bare (Selectmen's Appointee) 1993 

DECORDQVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 
"A" Trustees 

Joseph L. Bower 1996 

Jonathan Cohen 1993 

Robert C. Frank 1995 

John French 1994 

"B" Trustees 

Laurie Dewey (Selectmen's Appointee) 1993 

Roberta Kanarek (School Committee's Appointee) 1995 

Barbara Sisson (Library Trustees' Appointee) 1994 

HOUSING COMMISSION 



Giles Browne 1995 

Raymond Johnson (Appointed by the State) (Resigned) 1994 

Elizabeth (Lee) Harrison, Co-Chairman 1994 

Katherine Preston 1995 

Suzanne Werner Ross (Selectmen's Appointee) 1994 

RECREATION COMMITTEE 

John Adams, Chairman (Elected Post) 1995 

Donna Johnson (Elected Post) 1993 

Janet Maloney (Elected Post) 1994 

Kathleen S. Coleman (Selectmen's Appointee) 1993 

Anne Crosby (Selectmen's Appointee) 1994 

Richard Wiggin (Selectmen's Appointee) 1995 



14 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 
APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Term Expires 

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 

David W. Ramsay 1994 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT/FINANCE DIRECTOR 

Betty L. Lang 1994 

ASSISTANT EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 

Alyson Morse Katzman 1993 

TOWN COUNSEL 

David Dinwoodey 1993 

Thomas Arnold 1993 

TOWN ENGINEER 

Frank C. Emmons, Jr. 1993 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

Vincent DeAmicis 1993 

SUPERINTENDENT OF WATER DEPARTMENT 

Patrick Allen 1993 

CHIEF OF POLICE 

Dominick James Arena 1993 

DEPUTY CHIEF OF POLICE-PROSECUTOR 

Charles E. Doyle 1993 

POLICE SERGEANT 

David Davis 1993 

INSPECTOR 

Allen Bowles 1993 



15 



POLICE OFFICERS 



John Fitzgerald 
Robert Gallo 
Richard J. Hallett 
Andrew Kennedy 
Patrick Kenney 
Gerald Mahoney 
Richard McCarty 
Kevin Mooney 
Thomas Moran 



Domini ck James Arena 
Charles E. Doyle 



Leslie Boardman 



Dominick James Arena 



CONSTABLES 



DOG OFFICER 



FIRE CHIEF 



TREE WARDEN 



Todd Brown 



LOCAL SUPT. OF SHADE TREE MANAGEMENT 



FOREST WARDEN 



Dominick James Arena 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 
Ernest L. Johnson 



Ernest L. Johnson 



Kenneth Desmond 



Russell J. Dixon 



BUILDING INSPECTOR 



WIRING INSPECTOR 



PLUMBING INSPECTOR 



Term Expires 



1993 
1993 
1993 
1993 
1993 
1993 
1993 
1993 
1993 



1993 
1993 



1993 



1993 



1989 



1993 



1993 



1993 



1993 



1993 



16 



Term Expires 

DIRECTOR OF DEFENSE & EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS 

Thomas B. Moran 1993 

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF DEFENSE & EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS 

David W. Ramsay 1993 

COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER 

Curtis A. Risley 1993 

ASSISTANT COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER 

F. John Solman 1993 

HAZARDOUS WASTE COORDINATOR 

Richard Goddard 1993 

VETERANS' AGENT 

J. Lewis Cunningham 1993 

VETERANS' GRAVE OFFICER 

J. Lewis Cunningham 1993 

TOWN HISTORIAN 

Margaret M. Martin 1993 

REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 

Peggy Elliot 1995 

Marshall Sandock 1994 

Eleanor M. Wilfert 1993 
Nancy J. Zuelke, Ex officio 

MINUTEMAN HOME CARE 



Ruth Morey (Resigned) 1995 

Wendy Palu 1995 



17 



Term Expires 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Thomas Billings (Resigned) 1993 

Peter Conrad 1995 

Claire Cunningham (Resigned) 1993 

Jonathan Donaldson 1994 

Hector Galbraith (Resigned) 1994 

Joan Kimball, Chairman 1993 

Christopher Klem 1995 

Tara Tracy (Appointed) 1993 

Christopher White (Appointed) 1994 

COUNCIL ON AGING 



Albert Avery, III, Vice-Chairperson 1994 

Selima Chandler 1993 

Barbara Cone, Chairperson 1993 

Marian Cook 1994 

Shirley Drew 1993 

Marie Gavin 1995 

Allan Greaves 1995 

Barbara Grim 1994 

Russell Mahan, Secretary/Treasurer 1995 

Ruth Morey 1994 

Wendy Palu 1995 

Jacqueline Parker 1994 

Ruth Kramer, Coordinator 1994 

LINCOLN HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

Elizabeth Donaldson (At Large) 1995 

Eleanor Fitzgerald (Realtor) 1995 

Kenneth Hurd (Architect) 1993 

Colin Smith, Chairman (District) 1994 

Mary Spindler (Society) 1993 

HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 

Elizabeth Donaldson (At Large) 1995 

Eleanor Fitzgerald (Realtor) 1995 

Kenneth Hurd (Architect) 1993 

Colin Smith, Chairman (District) 1994 

Mary Spindler (Society) 1993 

Thomas Wang (Planning Bd. ) 1995 

James White (Planning Bd. ) 1994 

Abigail Congdon, Alternate (District) 1993 

Jane Lang ton, Alternate 1994 



18 



Term Expires 
PIERCE PROPERTY COMMITTEE 

Nelson Chu 1993 

William Shea 1995 

Judy Gross 1993 

LINCOLN CULTURAL COUNCIL 

Patricia Adams 1993 

Lynn Gargill, Co-Chairman 1993 

Barbara Garrison 1994 

Sandra A. Grindlay 1993 

Waleska James 1993 

Lanna Keller 1994 

Rally Kumler 1993 

Robert Loud 1994 

Stephanie Rolfe, Chairman 1994 

Lucy Sprayregen 1994 

Sidney Walker 1994 

REPRESENTATIVES TO HANSCOM FIELD ADVISORY COMMISSION 

James Hogan, "At Large" Representative 1994 

Timothy Shea, Alternate 1995 

REPRESENTATIVES TO HANSCOM AREA STUDY COMMITTEE (HATS) II 

Robert DeNormandie, Selectmen* s Appointee 

Terrence Fenton, Member at Large 

Dilla Tingley, Planning Board Appointee 

REPRESENTATIVE TO MBTA ADVISORY BOARD 

Alfred Seville 1993 

Harriet B. Todd, Alternate 1993 

REPRESENTATIVE TO METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL (MAPC) 

William Constable 1993 

REPRESENTATIVE TO MIDDLESEX COUNTY ADVISORY BOARD 

Harriet B. Todd 1993 



REPRESENTATIVE TO NORTH EAST SOLID WASTE COMMITTEE 

Henry Rugo 1994 

David W. Ramsay, Alternate 1994 



19 



Term Expires 

REPRESENTATIVES TO CAMBRIDGE WATERSHED ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Harriet B. Todd (Selectmen) 1993 

Crawley Cooper (Planning Board) 1993 

Christopher Klem (Conservation Commission) 1993 

Christohper White (Conservation Commission) 1993 

BOARD OF APPEALS 



Morton Braun 1993 

Margaret B. Marsh, Chairman 1997 

Despena Billings 1996 

David Ries 1995 

Andre Vagliano 1994 

F. John Solman, Associate Member 1994 

Amalie Kass, Associate Member 1996 

CELEBRATION COMMITTEE 



Neil Feinberg 1995 

Clare Pinto, Chairman 1994 



ROUTE 128 AREA COMMITTEE 



Susan Carr 

Terry Fen ton 

Earl Flansburgh 

Rollin Johnson 

Ann F. Ries, Chairman 

David Ries 

Edward Schwartz 

Richard Wiggin 

BEMIS HALL ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Debra Haiduven (Recreation Director) 

Barbara Beal (Representative of Friends of the Library) 

Christel Ide (Representative of First Parish Church) 

Ruth Kramer (Council on Aging Coordinator) 

Daniel Spaeth (Representative of Lincoln Players) 

Eleanor Wilfert (Representative of the Lincoln Grange), Chairman 

Alyson A. Morse-Katzman, Ex officio 



WATER MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE 



Pat Allen 
Leona Champeny 
Robert DeNormandie 
Frank Emmons 
Gabriel Farrell 



20 



Term Expires 

AQUIFER PROTECTION STUDY COMMITTEE 

Rebecca Bartovics (Water Commissions Appointee) 

Jonathan Cohen ( Selectmen* s Appointee) 

Palmer Faran (Planning Board Rep) 

Peter Guldberg (Selectmen's Appointee) 

Joan Kimball (Conservation Rep) 

John Kimball, Co-Chairman (Selectmen's Appointee) 

Edward Rolfe (Selectmen's Appointee) 

Tara Tracy (Selectmen's Appointee) 

Andre Vagliano, Co-Chairman (Selectmen's Appointee) 

Frank Emmons, Ex Officio 

RECYCLING COMMITTEE 



Abigail Avery 






Dorothy Brennan 






Vicki Diadiuk, Chairman 




Wesley Frost 






Hugo Liepmann 






Gwen Loud 


THE MATADEPERA COMMITTEE 




Margaret- Ann Rice 






Elizabeth Smith 


SPECIAL POLICE 


Term Expires 


Leo Algeo, Sr. 




1993 


John Barbetti 




1992 


Barbara Bardsley 




1993 


Gary Bardsley 




1993 


Raymond Barnes 




1993 


Norvaisa Birute 




1993 


Dennis A. Botelho 




1993 


JoAnne Carr (Conservation) 


1993 


Steven G. Carter 




1993 


Joseph Cavanaugh 




1993 


John Ciraso 




1993 


Arthur Cotoni 




1993 


Robert Collina 




1993 


Lorraine Dean 




1993 


Peter Dewey 




1993 


Frank Doraenichella 




1993 


Joseph Driscoll 




1993 


Neil Duane 




1993 


Frank Emmons 




1993 


Gregory Fall 




1993 


John Finnerty 




1993 



21 



SPECIAL POLICE CONTINUED 

Term Expires 

Richard Goddard 1993 

Frank Gordon, Jr. 1993 

Frank Gordon, Sr. 1993 

Elizabeth Green 1993 

Donald Hodgson 1993 

Ernest Johnson 1993 

Herbert Kelley, Jr. 1993 

Thomas Kowalski (Conservation) 1993 

Jane Layton (Conservation) 1993 

Steven Lennon 1993 

Paul Lund 1993 

David Maher 1993 

Richard McCarthy 1993 

Colin Moriarty 1993 

Robert Morrison 1993 

William Morrison 1993 

Michael Murphy 1993 

Michael Murray 1993 

Richard J. O'Brien 1993 

Robert J. O'Brien 1993 

Charles O'Loughlin 1993 

William Orpik 1993 

Theodore Poulos 1993 

Charles Rancourt 1993 

Daniel Reppucci (Conservation) 1993 

Kenneth Rivers 1993 

Timothy Robbins 1993 

Richard Russes 1993 

Patricia Ryan 1993 

William Ryan 1993 

Christopher Shea 1993 

Thomas C. Spencer 1993 

Bradford Stowe 1993 

Royce Taylor 1993 

Ronald Tolwinski 1993 

Richard Turcotte 1993 

Walter Van Wart 1993 

Kelly Walsh 1993 

Kevin Walsh 1993 

Peter Walsh 1993 

John Whalen 1993 

William Whalen, Jr. 1993 

Eric Williams 1993 



22 



Jane Barnet 
Nancy Ritchie 



APPOINTED BY THE TOWN CLERK 
ASSISTANT TOWN CLERK 

APPOINTED BY THE TREASURER 

ASSISTANT TREASURER 

Cynthia Bouchard 

APPOINTED BY THE COLLECTOR OF TAXES 

DEPUTY COLLECTOR OF TAXES 

Cynthia Bouchard 
Charles Doyle 

APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF HEALTH 

BURIAL AGENT 



Term Expires 



1993 
1993 



1993 



1993 
1993 



Nancy J. Zuelke 



1993 



Jane Barnet 



INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 

APPOINTED BY THE MODERATOR 
FINANCE COMMITTEE 



Robert Adkins 
Rosamond Delori 
Rainer Frost 
Toby Hayes 
Marcia A. Roehr 
Alvin Schmertzler 
Peter Sugar, Chairman 



Scott Lathrop 
Kathryn Nicholson 
Ann Sutherland Ries 



PERSONNEL BOARD 



REPRESENTATIVE TO MINUTEMAN REGIONAL 
VOCATIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT COMMITTEE 



1993 



Harold Levey 



1994 
1995 
1993 
1994 
1993 
1993 
1995 



1994 
1995 
1993 



1995 



23 



APPOINTED BY THE PLANNING BOARD 
ROADSIDE PATH COMMITTEE 



James Storer 
Sonja Johansson 
Marcia Lee 
Robert LIvermore 
Rosalind Feldberg 
Mark Naiman 

LONG-RANGE PLANNING COMMITTEE 

Elizabeth Downey 1993 

Robert Jenal 1991 

Robert Lemire, Chairman 1991 

Katherine Preston 1992 

Lawrence Thompson 1992 

APPOINTED BY VARIOUS BOARDS AND COMMITTEES 

SCHOLARSHIP FUND COMMITTEE 

Michaela Lipsey (Selectmen's Appointee) 1995 

Mary Spindler (Moderator's Appointee) 1994 

Eugene Taylor (School Committee's Appointee) 1993 

SCHOOL BUILDINGS COMMITTEE 



Douglas Adams 

Kenneth Bergen 

Esther Braun Vice Chairman 

Susyrati Bunanta 

Daniel Cheever 

Crawley Cooper 

Priscilla Damon 

Mark Deck 

Rita DiGiovanni 

Lynn Donaldson 

Earl Flansburgh 

George Georges 

Priscilla Kern 

Robert Lemire 

Sara Mattes 

Katherine McHugh 

Henry Morgan 

Patricia Salem, Chairman 

William Stason 

Leslie Vagliano 

Becky van der Bogert 



24 



BUNSAI-GAKUEN PROPERTIES 
SPECIAL OFFICERS 



John Brophy 
Robert A. Carter 
Charles Curran 
Andrew B. Damon 
Michael Hailson 
Alice Harkins 
Anthony Lagos 
Paul Liss 
Daniel J. Moore 
Paul Rose 



OTHER SPECIAL OFFICERS 



Minuteman Vocational High School Properties Only: Dennis Deeb 
and Randall Fox 

Audubon/Drumlin Properties Only: David Hill and Daniel Hart 

Cambridge Water Dept. Properties: Henry Manuel 

Walden Properties: William Bembury, Donald Faron, and William 
Schold 



25 



TOWN CLERK 

Nancy J. Zuelke 

The Town Clerk is the official recorder of Town events and 
activities and issues licenses and certificates. Her duties include 
recording the proceedings at Town Meetings and Elections, and 
notifying the Selectmen and other officers concerned of 
appropriations which have been voted. 

The record of registered voters of Lincoln is kept in the Town 
Clerk's Office. Persons wishing to become voters in the Town should 
communicate with the Clerk. 

In 1992, based upon the 1990 Federal Census the Board of 
Selectmen voted, and the state Local Elections Review Commission 
approved the discontinuance of the division of the town into 
precincts. This discontinuance took effect for the 1992 state 
primary. However, the state legislature established congressional 
districts based upon census blocks which split the town into two 
congressional districts. As of the September 1992 primary, the 
majority of the town is in the 7th Congressional District called 
precinct 1A, while a small portion remains in the 5th Congressional 
District called precinct IB. 

PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY 
March 10, 1992 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the Polls were declared open at 
7:00 a.m. by Nancy J. Zuelke, Town Clerk, who was assisted throughout 
the day by the following wardens: Joan Carley, Peggy Elliott, 
Eugenia Flint, Allan Greaves, Alice Hunsaker, Robert Kelleher, 
Marshall Sandock, Elizabeth Snelling, Eleanor Wilfert. The Poll 
were declared closed at 8:00 p.m. by Mrs. Zuelke. The total number 
of registered voters in Lincoln for this election was 3202. The 
total number of votes cast was 1674, which was divided as follows: 
Precinct 1: Republican - 151, Democratic - 328, for a total of 479; 
Precinct 2: Republican - 350, Democratic - 845, for a total of 1195. 



Republican 



:: 



Office Candidate Prec. 1 Prec. 2 Total ft, 

i 
Presidential Patrick J. Buchanan 32 
Preference David Duke 1 

George Bush 100 

No Preference 7 

Scattering 

Blanks 11 

151 350 501 



61 


93 


3 


4 


237 


337 


20 


24 


4 


4 


25 


36 



26 



State Committee 


Paul F. X. Powers 


11 


29 


40 


Man 


John R. Caswell 


124 


299 


423 




Blanks 


16 


22 


38 






151 


350 


501 


State Committee 


Joyce Kidd 


108 


259 


367 


Woman 


Blanks 


43 


91 


134 






151 


350 


501 


Town Committee 


Group 


71 


165 


236 




Robert J. Ke lie her 


85 


191 


276 




Margaret A. Spaeth 


94 


210 


304 




Nancy J. Coons 


92 


224 


316 




Benjamin A.. Kilgore 


81 


178 


259 




Elizabeth Kimnach 


80 


189 


269 




David M. Hill 


78 


190 


268 




Cynthia C. Hill 


83 


190 


273 




Donna G. Burt 


81 


187 


268 




Elizabeth J. Peavy 


87 


204 


291 




Eleanor M. Gallitano 


92 


213 


305 




Patricia D. Gray 


84 


186 


270 




Nancy B. Ellis 


105 


275 


380 




John T. Barry 


82 


187 


269 




Lawrence W. Whitman 


79 


190 


269 




Stephen V. Gray 


79 


185 


264 




Katherine J. Kelleher 


81 


186 


267 




Mary H. Kitses 


92 


211 


303 




John L. Armstrong 


88 


202 


290 




Alice Patricia Sweeney 


79 


187 


266 




William B. Russell 


86 


206 


292 




J. Frank Lane 


82 


191 


273 




John R. Caswell 


106 


262 


368 




Margaret G. Puffer 


86 


198 


284 




Dana W. Atchley, Jr. 


84 


189 


273 




Guido R. Perera, Jr. 


89 


225 


314 




Blanks 


1549 


3529 


5078 






3775 


8750 


12525 




Democratic 








'ffice 


Candidate 


Prec. 1 


Prec. 2 


Total 


residential 


Ralph Nader 


7 


20 


27 


Preference 


Lyndon H. LaRouche 













Jerry Brown 


55 


175 


230 




Ton Harkin 


2 


6 


8 




Larry Agran 


1 


1 


2 




Paul Tsongas 


234 


588 


822 




Eugene McCarthy 





2 


2 




Bill Clinton 


22 


40 


62 




Robert Kerry 


1 


1 


2 




No Preference 


1 


1 


2 




Blanks 


5 
328 


9 
845 


14 
1173 



27 



Office 



Candidate 



Prec 



Prec 



State Committee 
Man 



State Committee 
Woman 



Town Committee 



Thomas J. Larkin 
Michael J. O'Halloran 
Blanks 



Lorraine Greiff 
Lynne W. O'Halloran 
Blanks 



Group 

Louise K. DeBaryshe 
Marshall Sandock 
Henry M. Morgan 
Geraldine H. Linnell 
Carolyn Birmingham 
Mark Naiman 
Emanuel Maier 
Sylvia Maier 
Irving Telling 
Wesley T. Frost 
Roger W. Harris 
William G. Langton 
Peggy P. Elliott 
Sarah M. Corcoran 
Thomas B. Adams 
David L. Garrison 
Alice E. Garrison 
W. Robert Pearmain 
Claire P. Pearmain 
Susan F. Brooks 
Ada A. Hayes 
Cynthia W. Ritsher 
Robert L. Loud 
Jane C. Telling 
Edward H. Morgan 
Blanks 



178 


444 


622 


36 


104 


140 


114 


297 


411 


328 


845 


1173 


162 


479 


641 


50 


84 


134 


116 


282 


398 


328 


845 


1173 


138 


385 


523 


166 


426 


592 


150 


437 


587 


76 


644 


720 


150 


421 


571 


162 


467 


629 


150 


450 


600 


154 


451 


605 


153 


434 


587 


165 


455 


620 


160 


449 


609 


147 


425 


572 


159 


501 


660 


159 


485 


644 


154 


436 


590 


157 


495 


652 


155 


497 


652 


154 


476 


630 


166 


485 


651 


162 


471 


633 


166 


479 


645 


150 


422 


572 


161 


439 


600 


163 


502 


665 


165 


472 


637 





1 


1 


4030 


8675 


12705 



7872 



20280 



28152 



28 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
March 28, 1992 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the Meeting was called to 
order in the Brooks School Auditorium on March 28, 1992 by the 
Moderator, Mr. David M. Donaldson, at 9:37 a.m., and a quorum being 
present, (535 voters throughout the day) the following business was 
transacted: 

The Moderator called attention to Article 1 (Election of 
Officers), which will be acted upon on Monday, March 30, 1992, in the 
Smith School Gymnasium, with the polls being open from 7:30 a.m. 
until 8 p.m. 

The Moderator brought before the Meeting consideration of those 
articles which have been placed on the Consent Calendar, copies of 
which were sent to the voters at least seven days before the Town 
Meeting. Articles 8, 27, and 29 were held out. The other articles 
on the Consent Calendar (2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 14, and 15) were 
then adopted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 2. To bring in their votes for any Committees, 

Commissioners, Trustees, and other officers required by 

law to be elected by ballot or otherwise. 

VOTED: (On Consent Calendar) 

That Doug Adams, Buzz Constable and JoAnne Fraser 

be elected Measurers of Wood and Bark and Warren Flint, Jr. and 

Jennifer Donaldson be elected Fence Viewers for the ensuing year. 

ARTICLE 3. To hear and act upon the reports of the Town 

Officers, Committees, Commissioners and Trustees. 

VOTED: (On Consent Calendar) 

That the reports of the Town Officers, Committees, 

Commissioners, and Trustees, as printed in the Town Report, be 

accepted. 

ARTICLE 4. To fix the salaries and compensation of the several 

elective officers of the Town and to determine whether 

any Department, Board or Committee shall be authorized to employ for 

additional compensation any of its members and to fix additional 

compensation of such members. 

VOTED: (On Censent Calendar) 

That the salaries of the elected officials of the 

Town for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 1992, and ending June 30, 

1993, be fixed at the following amounts: 

Town Clerk $500.00 

Treasurer and Collector 10.00 
Assessors, Chairman 200.00 

Assessors, other members, each 175.00 
Water Commissioners, each 75.00 



29 



and that the Board of Assessors Is authorized to employ two o f .its 
members to work on assessing duties at salaries not to exceed 
$25,000. and $5,200., respectively for the said fiscal period. 

ARTICLE 5. To raise and appropriate money for the necessary and 

expedient purposes of the Town, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (By majority voice vote following reconsideration at 

the adjourned sessions) 
That the Town adopt as separate appropriations the recommendations 
listed in the report of the Finance Committee, printed on pages 25 
through 35, inclusive, of the Financial Section and Warrant for the 
1992 Annual Town Meeting and that all items be raised by taxation 
except to the following extent and to the extent provided in a second 
motion to be made under this Article: 

Item 15 Town Offices - Salaries - $60,000. to be taken from 
Water Department receipts and $60,000. to be taken from 
the Air Force School Account. 

Item 40 Conservation - Salaries - $8,000. to be taken from 
Conservation Commission Agency Account and $4,000. to 
be taken from the Wetlands Agency Account. 

Item 502 Elementary School - Instruction - $59,566. to be taken, 
from Metco funds. 

Item 504 Elementary School - Operation and Maintenance - $109. 
to be taken from the Grammar School Fund and $2,190. to 
be taken from the Julian DeCordova School Equipment 
Fund. 



Item 520 Library - Salaries - $2,742. to be taken from Dog Tax 
Receipts. 

Item 702 Cemetery - $4,000. to be taken from the Cemetery 
Improvement Fund and $1,500. to be taken from the 
Cemetery Perpetual Care Fund. 

Item 807 Debt Service - Flints' Fields Loan - $230,610. to be 
taken from Flints' Fields Contributions. 

Item 950- Water Department - $342,034. to be taken from Water 
956 Department receipts. 

The following sense of the meeting motion was passed by a majority 
voice vote: 



m 

tie 

:: : 

ion 

fcho 

■ r :r: 

*Pai 



■ces 

fcre 



That the Library Trustees keep the Library open longer hours witl 
diminished service. 



laid < 

■dii 



30 



The Total for General Purposes for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 
1992, through June 30, 1993, is shown as $12,013,094.89. After the 
application of the special funds as listed above, the amount to be 
raised is $11,580,377.89. 

At the conclusion of action on all money articles it was voted by a 
majority voice vote as follows (as a second motion under Article 5) 

VOTED: That the sura of $652,642.66 be taken from Free Cash to 

reduce the total amount to be raised by taxation, as 
voted under the first motion under this Article 5. 

(This second motion was TABLED following the first vote under Article 
5 until after Article 18 and reconsidered at the May 12 and May 19 
adjourned sessions.) 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money, in addition to that authorized under 
Article 5 of this Warrant, to provide general pay increases for 
employees as may be granted by the Selectmen and/or the Library 
Trustees, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (On Consent Calendar) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $7,832.88. 
to the Library, and $52,167.12. to the remaining Town departments for 
the fiscal year 1993, $3,268. of which is to be taken from Water 
Department receipts and the balance of which is to be raised by 
taxation, to provide general pay increases for employees as may be 
granted by the Selectmen and/or the Library Trustees. 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will authorize the Board of 
Selectmen and the School Committee to continue the 

Town's annual contract with the Secretary of Defense to operate the 

elementary school at Hanscom Air Force Base, Bedford, Massachusetts, 

or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: (On Consent Calendar) 

That the Town authorizes the Board of Selectmen and the 

School Committee to continue the Town's annual contract with the 

Secretary of Defense to operate the elementary school at Hanscom Air 

Force Base, Bedford, Massachusetts. 

VRTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
Eunds, by borrowing or any combination thereof, to be used by various 
iepartments for the purchase of vehicles and/or equipment, and to see 
Lf the Town will authorize the disposal by sale or otherwise of 
r excess vehicles and equipment, or take any other action relative 
:hereto. 
I0TED: (By Majority Voice Vote) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $34,236. 
said sum to be taken from Free Cash, to be used to purchase vehicles 
md equipment for various departments, and to authorize the Selectmen 
:o dispose by sale or otherwise of excess vehicles and equipment. 



31 



Ltl 



ARTICLE 9. To see If the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of 

money by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by 

borrowing or any combination thereof to be used for the construction, 

reconstruction, and/or maintenance and repair of roads and bridges, 

or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: (On Consent Calendar) 

That the Town appropriate the sura of $132,669. from 

available funds under G.L. Chapter 90 pursuant to Chapter 33 of the 

Acts of 1991 to be used for the construction, reconstruction, and/or 

maintenance and repair of roads and bridges. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 
sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 

funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof to pay an outstanding, 

bill incurred during Fiscal Year 1991, or take any other action 

relative thereto. 

VOTED: (On Consent Calendar) 
To pass over. 



ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will authorize the Board of 

Selectmen to file special legislation to enable payment^ 
of certain bills incurred by various departments that are not legallyd 
payable under Chapter 30B of the Massachusetts General Laws, and toj 
see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money by taxation, 
by transfer of available funds, by borrowing or any combination 
thereof to pay these bills once said special legislation is enacted! 
and the outstanding bills are legally payable, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town authorize the Board of Selectmen to file 
special legislation to enable payment of the following bills 
previously incurred by various departments that are not otherwise 
legally payable under Chapter 30B of the Massachusetts General Laws: 



Payee Amount 

Douglas Burckett $2,028.15 

Eliot Community Mental 

Health Center, Inc. $6,500.00 



Matrix Analytical, Inc. $4,820.80 



Kraft Food Services $ 824.04 



Purpose 
Reimbursement for Tax Map Update 



Community Mental Health Services 
(Fiscal Year 1991) 

Testing of Groundwater 

Cafeterial Supplies 



Joey's Auto Repair $1,418.40 Pacemaker Bus Repair 
Nashoba Valley $8,495.00 Ski School Programs 
Purrington Impressions $ 403.00 July 4 T-Shirts 



32 



and that the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $24,489.39., 
$824.04. of which will be taken from the School Lunch Fund, 
$1,418.40 of which will be taken from the Fiscal Year 1991 Hanscom 
Budget and the remainder to be taken from Free Cash, to pay all of 
the foregoing bills once said special legislation is enacted. 

At 3:50 p.m. it was moved, seconded and unanimously voted to recess 
the Annual Town Meeting until the completion of the Special Town 
Meeting. 

WARRANT FOR SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
MARCH 28, 1992 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the Special Town Meeting was 
called to order by the Moderator, Mr. David M. Donaldson, at 3:50 
p.m. and a quorum being present the following business was 
transacted: 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the 

Selectmen to take such action as may be requested by 
the North East Solid Waste Committee to facilitate the refunding of 
bonds issued to finance the solid waste resource recovery facility 
referred to in the Service Agreement between the Town and 
Massachusetts Refusetech, Inc. including without limitation the 
substitution of Wheelabrator Technologies Inc. for Allied-Signal 
Inc. as the guarantor of performance under the Service Agreement and 
the execution and delivery of such amendments to the Service 
Agreement and other agreements with the North East Solid Waste 
Committee as the Selectmen shall determine necessary and in the best 
interests of the Town to effect such refunding; or act in any other 
manner in relation thereto. 
VOTED : ( Unanimously ) 

That the Selectmen are authorized to take such action 
as may be requested by the North East Solid Waste Committee to 
facilitate the refunding of bonds issued to finance the solid waste 
resource recovery facility referred to in the Service Agreement 
between the Town and Massachusetts Refusetech, Inc. including 
without limitation the substitution of Wheelabrator Technologies 
Inc. for Allied-Signal Inc. as the guarantor of performance under 
the Service Agreement and the execution and delivery of such 
amendments to the Service Agreement and other agreements with the 
North East Solid Waste Committee as the Selectmen shall determine 
necessary and in the best interests of the Town to effect such 
refunding. 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 

funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof to pay outstanding 

bills incurred during Fiscal Year 1991, or take any other action 

relative thereto. 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to appropriate a sura of $671.39 

from Free Cash to pay outstanding bills incurred during Fiscal Year 

1991. 



33 



At the completion of Article 2 it was moved, seconded and 
unanimously voted to dissolve the Special Town Meeting at 3:55 
p.m.. The Annual Town Meeting was reconvened and the following 
business transacted. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 

a sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 

funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof, said monies to be 

put into the Town's Stabilization Fund, or take any other action 

relative thereto. 

DEFEATED: (By Majority Voice Vote following reconsideration at 
the May 19 adjourned session) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $242,647. from Free 

Cash to be put into the Town's Stabilization Fund. 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 

a sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof so that the School 
Building Committee can continue to plan for, and carry out, 
necessary renovations to the Town of Lincoln's public school 
buildings, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (By Majority Voice Vote as amended) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $75,000. 
from Free Cash for the purpose of obtaining architectural, 
engineering and other consultant or related services to assist the 
School Building Committee in developing three proposed plans: a base 
line option, a fiscal constraints option, a School Building 
Committee recommendations option, to be held in open meetings for 
necessary renovations to the Town of Lincoln's public school 
buildings . 

An amendment to reduce the sum to $50,000. was defeated by a 
majority voice vote. 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of 

money from Free Cash to the Fiscal Year 1992 Reserve 
Fund for the purpose of replacing amounts previously disbursed from 
said fund, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (On Consent Calendar) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $37,000. 
from Free Cash to the Fiscal Year 1992 Reserve Fund for the purpose 
of replacing amounts previously disbursed from said fund. 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 

a sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof for the purposes of 
undertaking necessary remodeling and/or repairs to the Town's school 
buildings in order to improve access to handicapped persons, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED (On Consent Caldendar) 

That the Town vote to appropriate $10,000. from Free 
Cash for the purposes of undertaking necessary remodeling and/or 
repairs to the Town's school buildings in order to improve access to 
handicapped persons. 

34 



ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION 
March 30, 1992 

In accordance with Article 1 of the Warrant for the Annual Town 
Meeting, the Polls were opened at 7:30 a.m. by Town Clerk, Nancy J. 
Zuelke. The following Wardens assisted Mrs. Zuelke throughout the 
day: Joan Carley, Peggy Elliott, Alan Greaves, George Hibben, 
Robert Kelleher, Elizabeth Snelling, Jane Telling, Eleanor Wilfert. 
The Polls were declared closed at 8:00 p.m. The total number of 
registered voters for this election was 3227. The total number of 
votes were as follows: There was a total vote of 1249, with 356 in 
Precinct 1 and 893 in Precinct 2, with the following results: 



Office 



Candidate 



Prec. 1 Prec. 2 



Total 



Town Clerk (1 yr) 



Board of Selectmen 
(3 yrs. ) 



Board of Selectmen 
(2 yrs.) 



Town Treasurer 
(1 yr.) 



Board of Assessors 
(3 yrs.) 



Collector of Taxes 



School Committee (2) 
(3 yrs.) 



Nancy J. Zuelke 
Blanks 



Harriet B. Todd 
Thomas Cap puce i 
Scattering 
Blanks 



300 

56 

356 

240 

15 

1 

100 

356 



Robert L. DeNormandie 177 
Neil Feinberg 159 
Blanks _20 

356 



Roy M. Raja 

Scattering 

Blanks 



Paul E, 
Blanks 



Marsh 



Roy M. Raja 

Scattering 

Blanks 



265 



91 

356 

278 

78 

356 

263 

1 

92 

356 



Henry M. Morgan 191 
Patrick G. Phillipps 139 
Patricia Salem 242 
Blanks 140 

712 



778 


1078 


115 


171 


893 


1249 


666 


906 


12 


27 


2 


3 


213 
893 


313 
1249 


487 


664 


350 


509 


56 


76 


893 


1249 


676 


941 


1 


1 


216 
893 


307 
1249 


718 


996 


175 


253 


893 


1249 


673 


936 


1 


2 


219 


311 


893 


1249 


528 


719 


416 


555 


519 


761 


323 


463 



1786 



2498 



35 



Office 


Candidate 


Prec. 1 


Prec. 2 


Total 


Water Corainlss loner 
(3 yrs.) 


Andrew Hall 

Scattering 

Blanks 


274 



82 

356 


689 

1 

203 

893 


963 

1 

285 

1249 


Board of Health 

(3 yrs.) 


Magruder C. Donaldson 217 
Albert England 81 
Blanks 58 

356 


525 
203 
165 
893 


742 

284 

223 

1249 


Cemetery Commissioner 
(3 yrs.) 


Martha P. DeNormandie 290 
Blanks 66 

356 


748 
145 


1038 

211 

1279 


Planning Board 
(5 yrs.) 


Kenneth Bassett 

Scattering 

Blanks 


270 



86 

356 


681 

1 
211 
893 


951 

1 

297 

1249 


Planning Board 
(1 Yr.) 


Anne Kessen Lowell 
Blanks 


245 
111 
356 


632 
261 
M3 


877 

172 

1275 


Commissioner of Trust 
Funds (3 yrs. ) 


Virginia Niles 

Scattering 

Blanks 


4 



352 

356 


11 

1 

881 

893 


15 

1 

1233 

1249 


Trustee of Bemis Fund 
(3 yrs.) 


Irene Weigel 
Blanks 


267 

89 

356 


658 
235 
893 


925 

324 

1249 


Trustee of Library 
(3 yrs.) 


Linda May 

Joseph M. Sussman 

Blanks 


206 

110 

40 

356 


484 
295 
114 
893 


690 

405 

154 

1249 


Trustee DeCordova 
Museum (4 yrs. ) 


Joseph L. Bower 
Blanks 


259 

97 

356 


658 
235 
893 


917 

332 

1249 


Housing Commission (2) 
(3 yrs.) 


Giles C. Browne 
Katherine Preston 
Scattering 
Blanks 


248 

22 



442 

712 


640 

61 

1 

1084 

1786 


883 

83 

1 

1526 

2498 


Recreation Committee 
(3 yrs.) 


John Adams 
Blanks 


265 

91 

356 


681 
212 
893 


946 

303 

1249 



36 



Office 



Candidate 



Prec. 1 Prec. 2 



Total 



Recreation Committee 
(1 yr.) 



Donna L. Johnson 
Blanks 



249 
107 
356 



640 
253 
893 



889 

360 

1249 



Lincoln-Sudbury 
Regional H.S, 
(3 yrs.) 



Geraldine C. Nogelo 193 

(2) David P. Wilson 170 

Blanks 349 

712 



498 

441 

847 

1786 



691 

611 

1196 

2498 



Question 1 



"Shall the Town of Lincoln be allowed to 
assess an additional $520,000 in real estate 
and personal property taxes for the purposes 
of funding the Town's operating expenses for 
the fiscal year beginning July first, 
nineteen hundred ninety-two?" 



Prec, 1 



Prec. 2 Total 



s 


158 


442 


600 




187 


419 


606 


anks 


11 


32 


43 




356 


893 


1249 



Question 2 



"Shall the Town of Lincoln be allowed to 
exempt from the provisions of proposition two 
and one-half, so called, the amounts required 
to pay for the Town's apportioned share of 
the bonds issued by the Lincoln-Sudbury 
Regional School District in order to finance 
costs of reconstructing, equipping, 
remodeling and making extraordinary repairs 
to the regional high school?" 





Prec. 1 
195 


Prec. 2 


Yes 


519 


No 


146 


338 


Blanks 


15 
356 


36 
893 



Total 

714 

484 

51 

1249 



37 



QUESTION 3 



QUESTION 4 



"Shall the Town of Lincoln be allowed to 
exempt from the provisions of proposition two 
and one-half, so called, the amount required 
to pay for the bond issued In order to 
continue to plan for, and carry out, 
necessary renovations to the Town of 
Lincoln's public school buildings." 



Prec. 1 



Prec. 2 Total 



174 


497 


671 


168 


353 


521 


14 
356 


43 
893 


57 
1249 



Yes 

No 

Blanks 



NON-BINDING PUBLIC OPINION ADVISORY QUESTION 

"Shall our Representative, Chester G. Atkins, 
and our Senators, Edward M. Kennedy and John 
F. Kerry, be instructed to take all suitable 
measures: 

1. to effect reductions of at least fiftyi 
percent (50%) in military expenditures by thi 
1996 budget year; 

2. to provide assistance to communities and 
employers to convert from military to' 
peacetime production; and 

3. to reallocate funds from military uses to 
meet domestic needs such as health care, 
education and environmental protection and to 
reduce the federal deficit?" 



Prec. 1 



Prec. 2 Total 



231 


650 


881 


99 


179 


278 


26 


64 


90 


356 


893 


1249 



Yes 

No 

Blanks 



A recount was held by the Lincoln Board of Registrars on April 9, 
1992 at 7:30 p.m. pursuant to a petition for such recount on Questior 
#1. As determined by the recount, the votes cast on Question //l were 
as follows: 



Prec. 1 



Prec. 2 Tota] 



Yes 
No 

Blanks 



159 


439 


186 


422 


11 
356 


34 
895 



598 

608 

45 

1251 



38 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING 
March 31, 1992 

On Tuesday, March 31, 1992, the adjourned session of the March 28, 
1992 Annual Town Meeting was called to order at 7:36 p.m. by the 
Moderator, Mr. David M. Donaldson, and a quorum being present, (351 
voters throughout the evening), the following business was transacted. 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof, said monies to be 
used for the purchase of equipment for the Lincoln Schools to enhance 
the education of students, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (By Majority Voice Vote) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $50,000. 
from Free Cash to be used for the purchase of equipment for the 
Lincoln Schools to enhance the education of students. 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof to be used to correct 
conditions in the Lincoln Schools which result in concentrations of 
lead in the water which are in excess of Federal Government standards 
for schools, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : ( Unanimously ) 
To Pass Over. 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof in order to pay 
supplemental consideration to the National Park Service ("NPS") in 
connection with the granting by the Town to the NPS of a conservation 
easement on Town-owned land adjacent to Minuteman National Historical 
Park in exchange for the granting by the NPS to the Town of an 
easement to provide access to the Town's refuse disposal area, all as 
previously authorized by vote taken under Article 30 of the Warrant 
for the 1990 Annual Town Meeting, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 
VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $9,000. 
from Free Cash in order to pay supplemental consideration to the 
National Park Service ("NPS") in connection with the granting by the 
Town to the NPS of a conservation easement on Town-owned land 
adjacent to Minuteman National Historical Park in exchange for the 
granting by the NPS to the Town of an easement to provide access to 
the Town's refuse disposal area, all as previously authorized by vote 
taken under Article 30 of the Warrant for the 1990 Annual Town 
Meeting. 



39 



ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town of Lincoln will vote to amend the 
Historic District By-Law, as follows: 

1. Add the following definition of "Athletic Field" to the by-law at 
Section 3, in proper alphabetical order and renumber subsections 3.2 
through 3.6 accordingly: 

Athletic Field : The words "athletic field" include a baseball or 
soccer field and any fencing, backstops, goals, benches or other 
structures and equipment usually associated with such fiel-is, 
provided a site plan for any proposed athletic field, or 
modifications to any existing athletic field, has been approved by 
the Board of Selectmen. 

2. Add the words "athletic field" after the word "walk" in 
subsection 3.6 so that the amended subsection reads: 

Structure : The word "structure" means a combination of materials 
other than a building, including a sign, fence, wall, terrace, walk, 
athletic field or driveway. 

3. Add the following exclusion to the review authority of the 
Historic District Commission as a new subsection 6.2.7: 

Athletic fields located entirely within the boundaries of property 
owned by the Town of Lincoln; 

or act on anything relative thereto. 
VOTED: (By Majority Voice Vote) 
To Pass Over. 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 
sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 

funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof for the design of 

capital improvements to the Town's water system, or take any other 

action relative thereto. 

VOTED: (By a majority voice vote) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $175,000. 

from Water Department receipts for the design of capital improvements 

to the Town's water system. 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof for the purpose of 
conducting a pilot plant study for filtration and associated tests in 
accordance with regulations of the Massachusetts Department of 
Environmental Protection, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (By Majority Voice Vote) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $80,000. 
from Water Department receipts for the purpose of conducting a pilot 
plant study for filtration and associated tests in accordance with 
regulations of the Massachusetts Department of Environmental 
Protection. 



40 



ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof to obtain engineering 
or other consultant services to study and implement various water 
quality treatment options at Farrar Pond and to purchase and install 
equipment related thereto, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (By Majority Voice Vote) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of £55,000. 
from Water Department receipts to obtain engineering or other 
consultant services to study and implement various water quality 
treatment options at Farrar Pond and to purchase and install 
equipment related thereto. 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof to obtain engineering 
or other consultant services to study watershed improvements at 
Flints Pond, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (By Majority Voice Vote) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $10,000. 
from Water Department receipts to obtain engineering or other 
consultant services to study watershed improvements at Flints Pond. 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to approve the 

establishment by the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional School 

District of a stabilization fund in accordance with the provisions of 

Chapter 71, Section 16G 1/2, of the General Laws, or take any other 

action relative thereto. 

VOTED: (By Majority Voice Vote) 

That the Town vote to approve the establishment by the 

Lincoln- Sudbury Regional School District of a stabilization fund in 

accordance with the provisions of Chapter 71, Section 16G 1/2, of the 

General Laws. 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to approve the amount of 

the $2,134,424.00 debt authorized on February 25, 1992 
by the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional School District School Committee for 
the purpose of financing costs of reconstructing, equipping, 
remodeling and making extraordinary repairs to the regional high 
school, including costs incidental and related thereto, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (By Majority Voice Vote) 

That the Town approve the amount of the $2,134,424.00. 
debt authorized on February 25, 1992 by the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional 
School District School Committee for the purpose of financing costs 
of reconstructing, equipping, remodeling and making extraordinary 
repairs to the regional high school, including costs incidental and 
related thereto. 



41 



ARTICLE 26. To sec whether the Town will authorize the Selectmen to 
appoint a committee to study and make recommendations 

to the Town regarding the linking of the property tax to the income 

of the owner. 

VOTED: (By majority Voice Vote as amended) 

That the Town authorize the Moderator to appoint a 

committee to study and make recommendations to the Town regarding the 

linking of the property tax to the income of the owner, at no cost to 

the town. 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to ratify or renew Its 

authorization to the Board of Selectmen, previously 
given by vote adopted under Article 46 of the Warrant for the 1989 
Annual Town Meeting and renewed by vote adopted under Article 31 of 
the Warrant for the 1991 Annual Town Meeting, to petition the General 
Court for special legislation which would effectively supercede or 
amend Chapter 359 of the Acts of 1979 of the General Court, which 
originally authorized the creation of the Lincoln Housing Commission, 
in order to provide that the powers and duties of the Housing 
Commission, and the procedures for the exercise of such powers and 
duties, shall be substantially identical to those powers, duties and 
procedures which are applicable to muncipal housing authorities as 
set forth in Chapter 121B of the General Laws, all in order to permit 
the Town to fully participate in State funding for affordable or 
subsidized housing programs, and to further provide for new terms of 
office for the election or appointment of the Commission's members, 
provided , however , that the Selectmen shall use their best efforts to 
seek inclusion in such special legislation of language which assures: 
(i) that no power of eminent domain shall be exercised by the Housing > 
Commission except upon a confirmatory vote of the Lincoln Town 
Meeting, and (ii) that the Housing Commission shall be obligated to 
report to each Annual Town Meeting of the Town of Lincoln (but shall 
not be obligated to seek Town Meeting approval, except pursuant to 
otherwise applicable law) as to (a) any plans for the construction, 
rehabilitation or use of housing which is not in compliance with the 
existing zoning bylaw of the Town, and (b) any portion of the Housing 
Commission's budget which is not provided by the Town, and provided , 
further , that such special legislation shall not take effect unles 
it has been presented to and approved by a subsequent Town Meeting; 
and to see if the Town will further authorize the Board of Selectmen 
to take all other actions which may be necessary or appropriate in 
furtherance of the foregoing vote. 
VOTED: (By Majority Voice Vote) 

That the Town vote to reaffirm its authorization to the 
Board of Selectmen, previously given by vote adopted under Article 46 
of the Warrant for the 1989 Annual Town Meeting and renewed by vote 
adopted under Article 31 of the Warrant for the 1991 Annual Town 
Meeting, to petition the General Court for special legislation whicl 
would effectively supercede or amend Chapter 359 of the Acts of 1979 
of the General Court, which originally authorized the creation of the 
Lincoln Housing Commission, in order to provide that the Housing 
Commission shall have the powers and duties of, and for all puposes 
shall be, a Housing Authority organized under the provisions oi 



42 



Chapter 121B of the General Laws, all in order to permit the Town to 
fully participate in State funding for affordable or subsidized 
housing programs, and to further provide for new terms of office for 
the election or appointment of the Commission's members, provided , 
however , that the Selectmen shall use their best efforts to seek 
inclusion in such special legislation of language which assures (i) 
that no power of eminent domain shall be exercised by the Housing 
Commission except upon a confirmatory vote of the Lincoln Town 
Meeting, and (ii) that the Housing Commission shall be obligated to 
report to each Annual Town Meeting of the Town of Lincoln (but shall 
not be obligated to seek Town Meeting approval, except pursuant to 
otherwise applicable law) as to (a) any plans for the construction, 
rehabilitation or use of housing which is not in compliance with the 
existing zoning bylaw of the Town, and (b) any portion of the Housing 
Commission's budget which is not provided by the Town, and provided , 
further , that such special legislation shall not take effect unless 
it has been presented to and approved by a subsequent Town Meeting; 
and to see if the Town will further authorize the Board of Selectmen 
to take all other actions which may be necessary or appropriate in 
furtherance of the foregoing vote. 

An amendment to the proposed legislation was passed by a vote of 88 
in favor, 87 opposed. The proposed legislation is as follows: 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in General 
Court assembled, and by the authority of the same, as follows: 

SECTION 1. The Lincoln Housing Commission established by Chapter 359 
of the Acts of 1979 shall have the powers and duties of, and shall 
for all purposes be, a housing authority organized under the 
provisions of Chapter 121B of the General Laws, as if such Housing 
Commission had been originally organized under said Chapter 121B, 
subject, however, to the following limitations. 

A. With respect to the organization of the authority and the 
election of its members, the following provisions shall apply: 

(1) All current members of the commission shall remain in 
office and shall serve until their respective successors are 
duly elected or appointed, as the case may be, pursuant to 
clause (2), and are qualified. 

(2) Four members of the authority shall be elected by the 
town, and one member shall be appointed by the secretary of the 
Executive Office of Communities and Development as follows: 

(a) At the town election one year following acceptance 
by the town the terms of all authority members shall 
expire. At that time one member shall be elected for 
three years, two members shall be elected for two 
years, and one member shall be elected for one year. 
At the same time one member shall be appointed by said 
secretary for three years. 



43 



(b) Thereafter, as the term of a member of the 
authority expires, his/her successor shall be appointed 
or elected, in the same manner and by the same body, 
for a terra of three years from such expiration. 
Membership in the authority shall be restricted to 
residents of said town. 

B. The power of eminent domain shall be exercised by the authority 
only upon the vote of the Lincoln town meeting taken in the same 
manner as is required with respect to the exercise by the town itself 
of the power of eminent domain and with necessary consent of seller. 

C. The authority shall report to each annual town meeting as to (a) 
any plans for the construction, rehabilitation or use of housing 
which is not in complaiance with then existing zoning by-laws of the 
town, and (b) the specific uses and applications of any portion of 
the authority's budget which is not appropriated by the town. The 
authority shall be obligated to seek town meeting approval with 
respect to any such matter so reported to town meeting, to extent of 
needing town meeting vote to change zoning. 

D. The authority will not have power to float bonds. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its acceptance by the 
town. 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to authorize a change in 

the use of the Codman Farmhouse from its original use 
as a shared living facility for the elderly and living quarters for 
the caretaker of the Codman Barn Complex as voted under Article 2 of 
the Warrant for the Special Town Meeting held on November 15, 1983, 
or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to permit the Lincoln Housing 
Commission to modify the designated use of the Codman Farmhouse, 
which is currently permitted to be used for elderly shared living and 
living quarters for the caretaker of the Codman Barn Complex pursuant 
to vote under Article 2 of the Warrant for the November 15, 1983 
Special Town Meeting, so as to also permit any other residential use 
or configuration or any other type of tenant which is determined to 
be appropriate by the Housing Commission. 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote, in accordance with Chapter 
40, section 4A of the Massachusetts General Laws, to 
authorize the Selectmen to enter into an agreement with several other 
surrounding Towns, known as Fire District 14, for the purpose of 
providing joint public safety services, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 
VOTED: (By Majority Voice Vote) 

That the Town vote to authorize the Selectmen to enter 
into an agreement with several other surrounding Towns, known as Fire 
District 14, for the purpose of providing joint public safety 
services, in accordance with Chapter 40, section 4A of the 
Massachusetts General Laws. 

44 



At 10:45 p.m. it was moved, seconded and unanimously voted to adjourn 
the meeting until Tuesday, May 12, 1992 at 7:30 PM. 

ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING 
May 12, 1992 

On Tuesday, May 12, 1992, the adjourned session of the March 28, 1992 
Annual Town Meeting was called to order at 7:40 p.m. by the 
Moderator, Mr. David M. Donaldson, and a quorum being present, (526 
voters throughout the evening), the following business was transacted. 

It was moved, seconded and unanimously voted to reconsider Article 5. 

Due to the fact that the override was defeated at the polls a motion 
was presented under Article 5 as follows: 

ARTICLE 5 VOTED: (By Majority Voice Vote) 

That the Town adopt as separate appropriations the 
recommendations listed in the report of the Finance Committee, 
printed on pages 25 through 35, inclusive, of the Financial Section 
and Warrant for the 1992 Annual Town Meeting except as amended to the 
following extent: 

Town Offices 16. Town Offices Expense $89,687.00 

Conservation Commission 40. Land Management Salaries 85,973.00 

Elementary Schools 502. Instruction 2,822,444.00 
Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School 

510. Regional High School 898,689.39 

Insurance 901. Employee Hospital & Ins. Fund 972,050.00 

902. Property & Indemnity Insurance 248,106.00 

and further, that all items be raised by taxation except to the 
following extent and to the extent provided in a second motion to be 
made under this Article: 

Item 15 Town Offices - Salaries - $60,000. to be taken from 
Water Department receipts and $60,000. to be taken from 
the Air Force School Account. 

Item 40 Conservation - Salaries - $8,000. to be taken from 
Conservation Commission Agency Account and $4,000. to 
be taken from the Wetlands Agency Account. 

Item 502 Elementary School - Instruction - $59,566. to be taken 
from Metco funds. 

Item 504 Elementary School - Operation and Maintenance - $109. 
to be taken from the Grammar School Fund and $2,190. to 
be taken from the Julian DeCordova School Equipment 
Fund. 

Item 520 Library - Salaries - $2,742. to be taken from Dog Tax 
Receipts. 



45 



Item 702 Cemetery - $4,000. to be taken from the Cemetery 
Improvement Fund and $1,500. to be taken from the 
Cemetery Perpetual Care Fund. 

Item 807 Debt Service - Flints' Fields Loan - $230,610. to be 
taken from Flints' Fields Contributions. 

Item 950- Water Department - $342,034. to be taken from Water 
956 Department receipts. 

It was moved, seconded and unanimously voted to reconsider Article 12. 

ARTICLE 12 VOTED: (By a standing vote of 310 yes, 194 no) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $242,647. 
from Free Cash to be put into the Town's Stabilization Fund. 

There being no further articles to be reconsidered it was voted at 
9:55 p.m. to adjourn this Town Meeting to Tuesday, May 19, 1992, at 
7:30 p.m. at the Brooks School Auditorium, unless the override 
question (Question 1) on the ballot for the May 18, 1992 Special Town 
Election is passed by the voters of the Town, in which case this Town 
Meeting shall thereupon be deemed dissolved without the necessity of 
further action. 



SPECIAL TOWN ELECTION 
May 18, 1992 

In accordance with the Warrant for the Special Town Election, the 
Polls were opened at 7:30 a.m. by Town Clerk, Nancy J. Zuelke. The 
following Wardens assisted Mrs. Zuelke throughout the day: Joan 
Carley, Tom Coan, Alan Greaves, Robert Kelleher, Marshall Sandock, 
Elizabeth Snelling, Eleanor Wilfert, Larry Zuelke. The Polls were 
declared closed at 8:00 p.m. The total number of votes were as 
follows: There was a total vote of 1610, with 457 in Precinct 1 and 
1153 in Precinct 2, with the following results: 

Question 1 "Shall the Town of Lincoln be allowed to assess an 
additional $260,000 in real estate and personal 
property taxes for the purposes of funding the Town's 
operating expenses for the fiscal year beginning July 
first, nineteen hundred ninety-two?" 

Prec. 1 Prec. 2 Total 

Yes 

No 

Blanks 



175 


537 


712 


275 


603 


878 


7 


_n 


20 


457 


1153 


1610 



46 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING 
May 19, 1992 

On Tuesday, May 19, 1992, the adjourned session of the March 28, 1992 
Annual Town Meeting was called to order at 7:40 p.m. by the 
Moderator, Mr. David M. Donaldson, and a quorum being present, (278 
voters throughout the evening), the following business was transacted. 

It was moved, seconded and unanimously voted to reconsider Article 5. 

Due to the defeat of the second override a motion under Article 5 was 
presented as follows: 

ARTICLE 5 VOTED: (By majority voice vote) 

That the Town adopt as separate appropriations the 
recommendations listed in the report of the Finance Committee, 
printed on pages 25 through 35, inclusive, of the Financial Section 
and Warrant for the 1992 Annual Town Meeting except as amended to the 
following extent: 

Town Offices 16. Town Offices Expense $89,637.00 

Conservation Commission 40. Land Management Salaries 85,973.00 
Elementary Schools 502. Instruction 2,812,444.00 
Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School 

510. Regional High School 898,689.39 

Town Debt Service 804. Interest on Temporary Loans 4,500.00 

Insurance 901. Employee Hospital & Ins, Fund 972,050.00 

902. Property & Indemnity Insurance 248,106.00 

and further, that all items be raised by taxation except to the 
following extent and to the extent provided in a second motion to be 
made under this Article: 

Item 15 Town Offices - Salaries - $60,000. to be taken from 
Water Department receipts and $60,000. to be taken from 
the Air Force School Account. 

Item 40 Conservation - Salaries - $8,000. to be taken from 
Conservation Commission Agency Account and $4,000. to 
be taken from the Wetlands Agency Account. 

Item 502 Elementary School - Instruction - $59,566. to be taken 
from Metco funds. 

Item 504 Elementary School - Operation and Maintenance - $109. 
to be taken from the Grammar School Fund and $2,190. to 
be taken from the Julian DeCordova School Equipment 
Fund. 

Item 520 Library - Salaries - $2,742. to be taken from Dog Tax 
Receipts. 



47 



Item 702 Cemetery - $4,000. to be taken from the Cemetery 
Improvement Fund and $1,500. to be taken from the 
Cemetery Perpetual Care Fund. 

Item 807 Debt Service - Flints* Fields Loan - $230,610. to be 
taken from Flints' Fields Contributions. 

Item 950- Water Department - $342,034. to be taken from Water 
956 Department receLpts. 

An amendment to reduce line item //16, Town expense, and increase line 
item //502 by $28,000.00 plus an individual contribution was defeated 
by a majority voice vote. 

An amendment to increase line item #502 by $10,000. with the 
understanding that the 2nd motion under Article 5 would be increased 
by $10,000. was passed by a standing vote of 138 yes, 109 no. 

A second motion under Article 5 was suspended until reconsideration 
of Article 12. 

VOTED: That the sum of $642,642.66. be taken from Free Cash to 
reduce the total amount to be raised by taxation, as 
voted under the first motion under this Article 5. 

It was moved, seconded and unanimously voted to reconsider Article 12. 

ARTICLE 12 DEFEATED: (By a majority voice vote) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $242,647. 
from Free Cash to be put into the Town's Stabilization Fund. 

There being no further articles to be reconsidered it was voted at 
8:45 p.m. to voted to dissolve the Town Meeting. 



48 



STATE PRIMARY 
September 15, 1992 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the Polls were declared open at 
7:00 a.m. by Nancy J. Zuelke, Town Clerk, who was assisted throughout 
the day by the following wardens: Thomas Coan, Peggy Elliott, 
Marshall Sandock, Elizabeth Snelling, Eleanor Wilfert. The Polls were 
declared closed at 8:00 p.m. by Mrs. Zuelke. The total number of 
registered voters for this election was 3328. The total number of 
votes cast was 768, which was divided as follows: Precinct 1A 
(District 7): Republican - 250, Democratic - 484, for a total of 734; 
Precinct IB (District 5): Republican - 8, Democratric - 26 for a total 
of 34, with the following results: 



Office 



Republican 
Candidate 



Total 



Rep. in Congress 
(7th District) 



Stephen A. Sohn 
Frank Vallarelli 
Patricia Long 
Blanks 



169 
34 
15 
32 

250 



Rep. in Congress 
(5th District) 



Michael G. Conway 
Paul W. Cronin 
Blanks 



Councillor 

(3rd District) 



Vincent P. McLaughlin 
Blanks 



182 

II 
258 



Senator in Gen. Court Lucile "Cile" P. Hicks 
(5th Middlesex Dist.) Blanks 



220 

38 

258 



Rep. in Gen. Court Blanks 
(15th Middlesex Dist.) 



258 



Sheriff Gary Buxton 

(Middlesex County) Michael J. Dever 

Vincent Lawrence Dixon 
Blanks 



90 
65 
48 
55 
258 



County Commissioner (2) Anthony F. Ranieri 
(Middlesex County) James P. Regan 

Edward L. Weinberg 
Blanks 



48 
143 

108 
217 
516 



49 



Democratic 



Office Candidate 



Rep. in Congress Edward J. Markey 382 

(7th District) Blanks 102 

Rep. in Congress Chester G. Atkins 17 

(5th District) Martin T. Meehan 8 

Blanks _J^ 

26 

Councillor (3rd Dist.) Robert B. Kennedy 145 

Michael J. O'Halloran 214 

Blanks 151 

510 

Senator in Gen. Court Blanks 510 

(5th Middlesex Dist.) 

Rep. in Gen. Court Stephen W. Doran 421 

(15th Middlesex Dist.) Blanks _89 

510 

Sheriff John P. McGonigle 294 

(Middlesex County) Blanks 216 

510 

County Commissioner (2) Edward J. Kennedy 135 

Thomas J. Larkin 308 

Leonard H. Golder 89 

Albert J. Onessimo 20 

Dennis J. Ready 45 

Adelle Schwalberg 121 

Blanks 302 

1020 



50 



STATE ELECTION 
November 3, 1992 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the Polls were declared open at 
7:00 a.m. by Nancy J. Zuelke, Town Clerk, who was assisted throughout 
the day by the following wardens: Thomas Coan, Peggy Elliott, 
Marshall Sandock, Elizabeth Snelling, Eleanor Wilfert. The Polls 
were declared closed at 8:00 p.m. by Mrs. Zuelke. The total number 
of votes cast was 3296, with 103 in Precinct 1A and 103 in Precinct 
IB. Total number of registered voters was 3559. Results are as 
follows : 



Office 



Candidate 



Total 



President & Vice 
President 



Bush & Quayle 
Clinton & Gore 
Fulani & Munoz 
Hagelin & Thompkins 
LaRouche, Jr. & Bevel 
Marrou & Lord 
Perot & Stockdale 
Phillips & Knight, Jr, 
Scattering 
Blanks 



868 

1748 

5 

2 



11 

491 



6 

165 

3296 



Rep. in Congress 
5th District 



Paul W. Cronin 
Martin T. Meehan 
David E. Coleman 
Mary J. Farinelli 
Blanks 



41 

42 



7 

13 

103 



Rep. in Congress 
7th District 



Edward J. Markey 
Stephen A. Sohn 
Robert B. Antonelli 
Blanks 



Councillor 3rd District Robert B. Kennedy 

Vincent P. McLaughlin 
Blanks 



Senator in Gen. Court 
5th Middlesex Dist. 



Lucile "Cile" P. Hicks 
Blanks 



1664 

1072 

149 

306 

3191 

1498 

1221 

575 

3294 

2453 

841 

3294 



Rep. in General Ct. 
15th Middlesex Dist. 



Stephen W. Doran 
Blanks 



2182 
1112 
3294 



51 



Office Candidate Total 

Sheriff John P. McGonigle 1515 

Middlesex County Michael J. Dever 692 

Blanks 1087 

3294 

County Commissioner (2) Edward J. Kennedy 1203 

Middlesex County Thomas J. Larkin 1377 

James P. Regan 1021 

Edward L. Weinberg 837 

Richard S. Mahoney 218 

Blanks 1932 

6588 

Question 1 LAW PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, on which no 
vote was taken by the Senate or the House of 
Representatives before May 6, 1992? 

SUMMARY 

This proposed law would establish a Health Protection 
Fund to pay for health programs relating to tobacco 
use, including distribution of information about 
tobacco use, to be financed by a new excise tax on 
cigarettes and smokeless tobacco. The Health 
Protection Fund would be used, subject to appropriation 
by the state Legislature, to supplement existing 
funding for the following purposes: school health 
education programs including information about the 
hazards of tobacco use; smoking prevention and smoking 
cessation programs in the workplace and community; 
tobacco-related public service advertising; drug 
education programs; support of prenatal and maternal 
care at community health centers which provide programs 
on smoking cessation and information on the harmful 
effects of smoking; and monitoring by the state 
Department of Public Health of illness and death 
associated with tobacco. 

The proposed law would establish a new excise tax of 
one and one-quarter cents per cigarette (twenty-five 
cents per pack of 20) and twenty-five percent of the 
wholesale price of smokeless tobacco. This excise 
would be in addition to the excise already imposed on 
cigarettes and smokeless tobacco. The new excise would 
be collected by the state Department of Revenue under 
the same procedures that apply to the existing tobacco 
excise. 



52 



The proposed law would direct the State Comptroller to 
report annually on the revenues and expenditures of the 
Health Protection Fund. The proposed law states that 
if any of its provisions were found invalid, the other 
provisions would remain in effect. The proposed law 
would go into effect on January 1, 1993. 

Yes 2490 

No 704 

Blanks 100 

3294 

Question 2 LAW PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, on which no 
vote was taken by the Senate or the House of 
Representatives before May 6, 1992? 

SUMMARY 

This proposed law would require certain banks, 
insurance companies and publicly-traded corporations to 
file annual reports with the Massachusetts Secretary of 
State listing information from their state tax returns, 
including profit, income, corporate income tax due, 
deductions, exemptions and credits. These reports 
would be made public. This provision would apply only 
to those banks, insurance companies and publicly-traded 
corporations required by federal and other 
Massachusetts laws to disclose information concerning 
their federal tax payments. 

The proposed law would also require the annual release 
by state officials of a detailed analysis of certain 
tax expenditures enacted or changed after January 1, 
1988. State law defines a tax expenditure as an 
exemption, exclusion, deduction, or credit that results 
in less corporate, sales, or income tax revenue for the 
state. This analysis would be required only for tax 
expenditures with an annual revenue impact of 
$1,000,000 or more. The analysis would include 
information on the actual revenue loss, as well as the 
number and proportion of taxpayers or taxpaying 
entities benefiting from the tax expenditure, according 
to income, profit, receipts or sales. 

Yes 1737 

No 1088 

Blanks 469 

3294 



53 



Question 3 LAW PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 

Do you approve of a law summaried below, on which no 
vote was taken by the Senate or the House of 
Representatives before May 6, 1992? 

SUMMARY 

This proposed law would require all packaging used in 
Massachusetts on or after July 1, 1996 to be reduced in 
size, reusable, or made of materials that have been or 
could be recycled. The proposed law would provide for 
exemptions for health, safety, and other reasons and 
would establish penalties for violations. 

Packaging would have to be either reduced in size by at 
least 25% every five years; or designed to be reusable 
at least five times, with at least 50% of such 
packaging actually being reused; or recycled at a 50% 
rate; or composed of 25% or more of recycled materials 
(increasing to 35% on July 1, 1999 and 50% on July 1, 
2002); or composed of materials being recycled at an 
annual rate of 25% (increasing to 35% in 1999 and 50% 
In 2002). The requirements would apply to any 
packaging or containers used to protect, store, handle, 
transport, display or sell products. 

These requirements would not be applicable to 
tamper-resistant or tamper-evident seals; packaging for 
medication or medical devices; packaging merely being 
shipped through the state; packaging required by 
federal or state health or safety laws or regulations; 
or flexible film packaging necessary to prevent food 
from spoiling. 

The state Department of Environmental Protection could 
also grant exemptions for packaging that represents an 
innovative approach for which additional time is needed 
to meet the requirements of the law; or packaging made 
of material that cannot be reused or recycled, and 
cannot be made of recycled material, but is being 
composted at a significant rate; or products for which 
there is no complying packaging and for which 
compliance with the law would impose undue hardship 
(other than increased costs) on Massachusetts 
residents. A person applying for an exemption would 
pay a fee to be used subject to legislative 
appropriation, to pay the cost of administering the 
proposed law. 



54 



The Department would be required to issue regulations 
to carry out the proposed law and would be required to 
investigate suspected violations. After issuing a 
warning, the Department could assess administrative 
penalties of up to $100 for each offense and up to 
$10,000 for any single shipment or single continuing 
act of non-compliance. The state Attorney General 
could also file court actions for civil penalties of up 
to $500 for each offense and up to $25,000 for any 
single shipment or continuing act of non-compliance, 
and could seek a court order requiring compliance. 
Each non-complying piece of packaging would be 
considered a separate offense or act of non-compliance. 

The proposed law states that if any of its provisions 
were declared invalid, the other provisions would 
remain in effect. 

Yes 2045 

No 1138 

Blanks 111 

3294 

Question 4 LAW PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, on which no 
vote was taken by the Senate or the House of 
Representatives before May 6, 1992? 

SUMMARY 

This proposed law would impose an excise tax on oil, 
toxic chemicals, and other hazardous substances, and 
would direct that the money raised, along with the fees 
paid by hazardous waste transporters and specific 
revenues under other state laws, be deposited in the 
state Environmental Challenge Fund. Money in the Fund 
would be used, subject to legislative appropriation, to 
assess and clean up sites that have been or may be 
contaminated by oil or hazardous materials, and to 
carry out and enforce the exise. 

As of July 1, 1993, the excise would apply to persons, 
businesses, and other entities possessing 50,000 pounds 
or more of oil and toxic chemicals covered by the 
proposed law. Toxic chemicals would be covered if 
classified as toxic by the federal Environmental 
Protection Administration (EPA) under federal law. As 
of July 1, 1994, substances listed as hazardous by the 
EPA under federal law would also become subject to the 
excise. 



55 



Until June 30, 1995, the excise would be two-tenths of 
one cent ($0,002) per pound. In later years, the state 
Commissioner of Revenue would set the excise rate at a 
level, not to exceed two-tenths of one cent per pound, 
sufficient to yield $35 million annually in 1995 
dollars. 

The excise would not apply to gasoline or other special 
engine fuels, jet fuel taxed under other state law, 
numbers 1 or 2 fuel oil, kerosene, animal or vegetable 
oil, or waste oil classified as hazardous waste under 
other state law. Nor would the excise apply to oils, 
toxic chemicals, or hazardous substances merely being 
shipped through Massachusetts; or contained in a 
consumer product intended for retail sale; or present 
in a mixture at a concentration of less than one 
percent; or present in hazardous waste being 
transported by a licensed hazardous waste transporter 
who had paid or will pay a transporter fee under state 
law; or for which the excise tax has already been paid 
under the proposed law and which have not been 
reprocessed or recycled since payment of the excise. 

The excise also would not apply to oils, toxic 
chemicals, or hazardous substances that are possessed 
by individuals for personal, non-business purposes; or 
are contained in vehicles or vessels intended to be 
used for normal purposes; or are produced in 
Massachusetts as a by-product of pollution control 
equipment or the clean-up of hazardous materials and 
are handled in compliance with federal and state 
environmental laws. Finally, the excise would not 
apply to toxic chemicals or hazardous substances in a 
manufactured product the use of which requires a 
specific shape or design and which does not release 
toxic substances under normal use. 

Under the proposed law, the excise would ordinarily be 
collected from the first person or business within 
Massachusetts to come into possession of materials 
subject to the tax. If that person or business had not 
paid the excise a later possessor could be required to 
pay the excise and could then recover a corresponding 
amount from the first possessor. The proposed law 
would provide credits for excises paid on materials 
that become ingredients in the manufacture of other 
materials subject to the tax, and it would provide 
credits for similar excises or taxes paid to other 
states. 



56 



Persons possessing more than 25,000 pounds of materials 
subject to the excise in any six-month period would be 
required to obtain a license from the Commissioner of 
Revenue. The Commissioner could issue regulations 
establishing record-keeping and reporting requirements 
for persons possessing such materials. The 
Commissioner would collect the excise through 
procedures similar to those for other state taxes and 
could issue regulations to implement the proposed law. 

The proposed law states that if any of its provisions 
were declared invlaid, the other provisions would 
remain in effect. 

Yes 1690 

No 1394 

Blanks 210 

3294 

Question 5 THIS QUESTION IS NOT BINDING 

Shall the representative from this district be 
instructed to vote in favor of legislation to establish 
an independent Massachusetts Energy Authority that 
would collect a fee on fossil fuels brought into the 
state by commercial enterprises and would disburse the 
revenue to stimulate the growth of Massachusetts 
businesses which provide products and services that 
support the use of non-polluting renewable energy or 
maximize energy conservation? 

Yes 1412 

No 1215 

Blanks 667 

3294 



57 



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59 



OUTSTANDING DEBT AT -JUNE 30, 1992 

20,000 Conservation Land Loan, 4.65%, due $20,000 

April 1, 1993, issued under Ch. 44, S. 7(3) of 
the G. L. 
300,000 Conservation Land Loan, 7.25%, due $150,000 each April 
1, 1993-94, issued under Ch. 44, S. 7(3) of the G. L. 
20,000 Codman Housing Loan, 7.25%, due $10,000 each April 1, 

1993-94, issued under Ch. 359, Acts of 1979 of the G.L. 

225,000 Conservation Land Loan, 7.60%, due $75,000 each Nov. 15, 

1992-94, issued under Ch. 44, S. 7(3) of the G.L. 

2,220,000 General Obligation Bonds, 5.7696%, due $400,000 each 

March 15, 1993-96, and due $370,000 March 15, 1997, an- 

due $250,000 March 15, 1998, issued under Ch. 44, S 

7(3) and (3A) and 7(25), and Ch. 359 of the Acts of; 

1979, S. 3 of the G.L. 

10,000 Highway Sweeper Loan, 6.25%, due $10,000 April 15, 1993, 

issued under Ch. 44, S. 7(9). 

2,920,000 General Obligation Bonds, 6.3481%, due $365,000 each 

Nov. 15, 1992-99, issued under Ch. 44, S. 7(3), 

S. 8(22), and S. 8(24) of the G.L. 



5,715,000 TOTAL MUNICIPAL LOANS 



5,715,000 NET DEBT 

240,000 Water Loan, 7.80%, due $80,000 each Dec. 1, 1992-94. 



240,000 TOTAL WATER BONDS 



5,955,000 TOTAL DEBT (BONDED) 



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68 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 



G. Sargent Janes 

Paul E. Marsh 

Douglas M. Burckett, Chairman 



In 1992, applications for abatement continued to come in in 
large numbers. Most of them cited — and enclosed — current ap- 
praisals of their property done by a realtor, bank, or insurance 
company. All these reports are estimates — just like our assess- 
ments, but, unlike ours, they are based on present comparisons with 
three other properties (perhaps in Lincoln), while our assessments 
must be as of the prior January 1 and must reflect as closely as 
possible the behavior of the real estate market in all of Lincoln for 
all of the twelve months before that. Consequently, your Assessors 
find single, fee appraisals less than compelling evidence. 



More persuasive is the price for which a property in Lincoln 
sold in 1992. Comparison of all such prices, with their companion 
assessments throughout the year will reveal how well the Board esti- 
mated values for the Town as a whole; any single comparison is inter- 
esting but less than conclusive. 



For six years — since 1986 — the Board of Assessors has repor- 
ted on its undertaking to computerize its operations. This year the 
report is dismal and unpleasant. Inspired by the ringing endorsement 
of volunteerism by the Townwide Conference and by a direct plea for 
help in data entry from the Assessors at an all-Town-Board meeting 
led by the Moderator, a volunteer offered his help. He quickly 
proved to be competent and congenial (both to the Assessors* Office 
and to the state Department of Revenue). When we learnt that enter- 
ing all the data we needed into the computer set-up we had sitting 
there would take some 600 hours, that the only other data entry per- 
son we had — our clerk — would have no spare time, and that our 
volunteer was unemployed, we proposed to hire him as a temporary, 
part-time data entry technician. In the six (or seven) months since 
that proposal, the Selectmen's Office has been unable to put him on 
the payroll, even though we have several times the funds needed to 
cover his contract. Our undertaking has ground to a virtual stand- 
still — and it remains essential to the future of the Assessing 
function in Lincoln. 



69 



Items of assessing regulations you should be familiar with: 



1. The status of property on January 1 is the determinant 
of its value in any year. 



2. All real estate and personal tax abatement applications 
must be filed with the Board by October 1 of the year 
Involved or within 30 days after the date of mailing of 
the fall tax bill. 

3. Motor vehicle and trailer excise tax abatement applica- 
tions must be filed with the Board by December 31 of 
the year succeeding the year involved. If cars are 
changed during the year, it Is the taxpayer's responsi- 
bility to file an abatement application. 

4. Chapter 59, Section 5, Clause 41C of the General Laws, 
as amended, provides for certain real estate tax exemp- 
tions for taxpayers who meet certain age, financial, 
etc., qualifications. Additional information may be 
obtained from the Assessors' Office. All applications 
under Clause 41C must be filed by December 15 of the 
year involved. 

5. Chapter 59, Section 5, Clause 41A provides for the 
deferral of real estate tax payments in certain 
instances. Additional information may be obtained from 
the Assessors' Office. All applications under this 
clause must be filed by December 15 of the year 
involved . 

6. Veterans with 10% or more disability, holders of Purple 
Heart awards, and others, may qualify for a partial 
exemption. Additional information may be obtained from 
the Assessors' Office. 



70 



1992-93 RECAPITULATION 



Amount to be raised by Taxation 



$ 9,706,525.71 



Valuation and Tax Rate 

Real Estate 

Residential 

Open Space 

Commercial 

Industrial 
Personal Property 
Total Valuation 



$ 720,818,200 
17,087,900 
17,468,100 

- - 
10,124,673 

$ 765,498,873 



Tax Rate per Thousand (1992-93) $12.68 



REAL ESTATE SUMMARY 



Property Description 
Residential-single 
dwelling unit 


No. of Parcels 
1425 


Assessed Value 
Jan. 1, 1991 
$ 634,812,300 


Condominiums 


260 


57,148,600 


Residential - two or 
more dwelling units 


8 


12,980,900 


Part commercial / 
Part residential 


7 


2,430,000 


Commercial 


17 


16,217,300 



Land classified under Ch 61, 
61 A, & 61B 

Agricultural, 

Forest, or 

Recreational 



20 



220,800 



Conservation Restriction 
Vacant Land 



78 
260 



1,504,800 
30,059,500 



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73 



Protection of Persons and Property 



FIRE AND POLICE DEPARTMENT 

D. James Arena, Chief 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

The following is a report of the activities of the Lincoln Police 
Department for the calendar year 1992: 

MOTOR VEHICLE ENFORCEMENT AND INVESTIGATIONS: 

Accidents investigated 166 

Fatal accidents 1 

Citations issued 879 

CRIMINAL LAW ENFORCEMENT AND INVESTIGATIONS: 

Crimes reported and investigated: 

Break and Entry 19 

Larcenies 64 

Stolen Cars 

Narcotic Violations 1 

Ordinance Violations 21 

Vandalism 64 

Disturbances 21 

Domestic/ Civil Cases 74 

Reports of Attempted Crimes 25 

Non-classified 109 

Arrests 57 

MISCELLANEOUS ACTIVITIES: 

Response to burglar alarms 806 

Reports of suspicious activity 182 

Animal complaints 121 

Ambulance runs 260 

Ambulance transportation 171 

For the third straight year, reports of serious crimes have seen 

a decline although we did note an Increase in reports of domestic 
problems, a malaise which seems to be spreading to all communities. 

During the year, two officers left our Department. Patrick 

Kenney, who had been here for over five years, accepted an 
appointment with the Milton Police Department, and Chris Shea, 



74 



former Hudson Police Officer, decided to return to that Department 
due to the reinstatement of a previously cut position. To replace 
these men, we appointed Richard McCarty, a former Dispatcher with 
Lincoln, and Andrew Kennedy, a former South Portland, Maine police 
officer. 

In closing, we once again extend our appreciation to the citizens 
of the community for their support of our endeavors and also extend a 
special thanks to the members of the other Town departments for their 
cooperation. 



75 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

The following is a report of the activities of the Lincoln Fire 
Department for the calendar year 1992: 



Accidents responded to 


68 


Ambulance runs 


260 


Ambulance transports 


171 


Brush fires 


4 


Building fires 


20 


False alarms 


186 


Investigations 


63 


Lock-outs (vehicle & property) 


151 


Vehicle Fires 


5 


Mutual aid responses 


47 


Reports of burning 


17 


Special service calls 


40 


Reports of water problems 




(flooding, etc. ) 


8 


Reports of wires down/arcing 


19 



It should be pointed out that the "false alarm" category dealL 
primarily with house and business alarms received at the station and 
99% of the time caused by malfunction or human error on the part of 
the occupant. We cannot emphasize enough requesting that alarm 
owners exercise as much concern as possible to cut down on the need 
for such responses. 

During the year the Department also performed many miscellaneous 
activities relating to school drills, alarm work, inspections and 
training. The progress of compliance with the underground storage 
tank by-law has been encouraging and we thank those involved for 
their cooperation and efforts. 

We once again remind all of the value and importance of smoke 
detectors; we stand ready to offer advice on the same at any time. 

Again, thanks to all for their cooperation and support and an 
additional word of appreciation to our fellow Town employees. 



76 



BUILDING DEPARTMENT 

Ernest Johnson, Building Commissioner 

Courtney Atkinson, Assistant Building Inspector 

Kenneth Desmond, Electrical and Fire Alarm Inspector 

Russell J. Dixon, Plumbing and Gas Inspector 

James Sullivan, Assistant Plumbing and Gas Inspector 

Earl Midgeley, Special Assistant to the Building Inspector 

Jane Barnet, Administrative Assistant 



The Battle Road Farm housing development has sold out in 
Phase I. Of the 32 units in Phase II, 30 units have been sold as of 
the end of the year and the remaining two units are under agreement. 

The Ryan Estate, a 24 unit complex available to those over 55 
years of age, was built on Lincoln Road across from the Lincoln 
Mall. Occupancy is expected to begin in February of 1993. This is a 
very attractive building and is a great addition to the south Lincoln 
business district. 

New residential building starts have gone up by 10 new houses 
from a year ago with remodeling and additions staying much the same. 
The values of new work totaled close to eight million dollars, up 1 
million from last year. However, if one were to include the Ryan 
Estate, the value of new work rose by three (plus) million dollars. 

Total income from permits ($61,344) was up some $10,000 over 
the previous year. The Ryan Estate boosted the entire total income 
from permit fees to $10,449,565. Below are the statistics for the 
year 1992. 



Values as submitted by applicants — 

Building Total $10,449,565.00 

Ryan Estate - Building 2,494,000.00 

Building Total less Ryan Estate 7,955,000.00 

Plumbing 389,525.00 

Ryan Estate - Plumbing 66,750.00 

Plumbing Total less Ryan Estate 322,775.00 

Electrical 431,340.00 

Ryan Estate - Electrical 138,800.00 

Electrical Total less Ryan Estate 292,540.00 



Permits issued — 

New Residential 18 

Additions and Remodeling 76 

Garages, Sheds, Barns 20 

Swimming Pools 4 

Greenhouses 



77 



Re-roofing 

Tents (temporary) 

Signs 

Woodburning Stoves 

Fences 


9 
32 
1 
6 
4 


Tennis Courts 


3 


Accessory Apartments 

Total 



173 


Permit fees collected — 




Building 

Building - Ryan Estate 

Building Total less Ryan Estate 

Plumbing 

Plumbing - Ryan Estate 

Plumbing Total less Ryan Estate 

Electrical 


$ 54,176.00 

12,470.00 

41,706.00 

9,674.00 

1,354.00 

8,320.00 

16,556.00 


Electrical - Ryan Estate 


5,572.00 


Electrical Total less Ryan Estate 


10,984.00 


Woodburning Stoves 

Recertifications 
Total 

Total - Ryan Estate 
Total less Ryan Estate 


150.00 

185.00 

$161,147.00 

$ 19,369.00 

$141,751.00 



78 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

Ernest L. Johnson 

Please note the following regarding FIREWOOD deliveries: 
State Law requires, under the provisions of Sec. 299 of M.G.L. 
Chapter 94, that a delivery certificate be issued by the seller 
at the time of delivery. Said delivery and the price of the 
quantity of wood delivered in terms of cubic feet and the date 
of delivery must be included on the sales slip. The words CORD, 
TRUCKLOAD, FACE CORD, PILE or terms of similar import are 
expressly prohibited by Statute, Section 298 of M.G.L. Chapter 
94, from being used either in advertisements or delivery 
certificates or sales invoices. Quantity (in cubic feet) is 
measured when the wood is closely stacked. 

The General Laws of Massachusetts require that all devices 
used for weighing or measuring commodities be accurately checked 
and certified by "SEALS" at least once each year. 

For the period commencing January 1, 1992, and ending 
December 31, 1992, inclusive, in compliance with Section 37, 
Chapter 98, General Laws as amended, the following number of 
devices have been certified: 

Scales sealed 9 

Gasoline pumps sealed 25 

Diesel pumps sealed 4 

Scales not sealed 1 

Total 39 

Sealing fees collected $576.00 

Scales and gasoline pumps not sealed require repairs or 
adjustments. 

Any questions regarding weights and measures should be 
submitted to the Sealer of Weights and Measures at the Town 
Offices Building. 



79 



Health and Welfare 



BOARD OF HEALTH 

Joan Comstock, R.N. Vice-Chair man 
Dr. Craig Donaldson, Secretary 
Dr. Perry Culver, Chairman 

Agents for the Board: 

Jane Barnet, Administrative Assistant 
Frank C. Emmons, Engineer 
John J. Devine, Sanitarian 
Jane Barnet, Animal Inspector 

The Board of Health respectfully presents to the Town of 
Lincoln its annual report upon the sanitary condition of the Town and 
the action of the Board in that relation. 

The Board has held frequent meetings and consultations and 
visited sundry places, to which its attention was called. Early in 
the year copies of the rules adopted by the Board were posted through 
the Town for the guidance of those who might otherwise have due 
regard for the rights and interests of their neighbors and the 
public. In formulating these rules, the Board aimed to be impartial 
and just with all citizens, depriving none of any just right but to 
protect all in the undoubted right to breathe pure air. 

The value of real estate in the town largely depends upon our 
manifest purpose to maintain good order and such sanitary measures as 
commend the town to those seeking homes in the country. 

The insistent prohibition of the sale of intoxicating liquors 
in the Town adds a positive value to every acre of ground; so too, 
will the insistence upon the reasonable sanitary requirements of the 
Board of Health. Lincoln is not only one of the most beautiful towns 
in the State, but it is one of the most healthful. Our population is 
now about twelve hundred; the death rate in the last year was but 
three-quarters of one percent. If this is not a fact to be proud of, 
it is one we should be truly thankful for. 

The Board would in conclusion reiterate its suggestion of last 
year, that it is the duty of every citizen to himself and the 
community in which he lives to promptly report all causes worthy of 
complaint, in which disregard of public right to pure air and pure 
water is manifest. 

Moses W. Kidder, M.D. Chairman. Lincoln, February 4, 1899 



80 



In the 94 years since that report was written, the Board of 
Health has steadfastly maintained its dedication to protecting the 
quality of air and water in Lincoln. Except for topical references, 
the 1899 report could have been written for the year 1992. 

Cindy Anthony, R.N. , continues in the position as School/Town 
Nurse and the Board is most pleased with her performance. She is 
available to serve townspeople and can be reached at 259-9407. 

The Board of Health meets the first Monday of each month and 
more often, if needed. 

Reports of Board Activities : 

1. Enforcement of Title V of the State Environmental Code: 

This included conducting examinations of sites for sewage and 

septage disposal, issuing permits, inspecting and approving 

installation of equipment, holding hearings, granting variances, 
etc. Summary of activities is as follows: (1992) 

Site investigations witnessed (i.e., percolation 

tests and test pits) 45 

Septic systems plans reviewed and approved 47 

Systems investigated for accessory apartments 2 

Installers permits issued 23 
Septage handlers equipment inspected and licenses 

issued 6 

Fees collected by the Board in 1992 were as follows: 

Soil Test Witnessing $ 7,075 

Plan Review 8,450 

Disposal Installer Licenses 1,150 

Septage Handler Licenses 300 

Food Service Permits 175 

Total $17,150 

2. Sanitarian Inspections: 

Sanitarian John Devine helped the Board enforce local health 

regulations according to Chapter X of the State Sanitary Code. 

Regular inspections of food service establishments in Lincoln were 

;j performed during the year including restaurants and food service 

I facilities in stores, schools, institutions, farm stands, as well as 

| several facilities at Hanscom Field. The Codman Pool and Bathhouse 

ijwere also inspected periodically by the Sanitarian as were the three 

[jday camps and Farrington Memorial. Any complaints of possible food 

contamination are also investigated by the Sanitarian. 



81 



3. School Health Program: 

The school health program alms to promote and protect the 
health of students, and encourage the development of healthy 
lifestyles. The services provide for early identification of illness 
or injuries, emergency treatment, and prompt referral to a medical 
facility as necessary. Director of Pupil Services, Dorothy Olsen, 
works closely with the school nurse and aides to ensure that the 
health program runs smoothly within the school. Dr. Lynn Weigel 
served as the school physician, and his input and information has 
been very helpful. 

The school nurse has, over the course of the last few years, I 
become more involved in the health teaching within the school. The 
health teaching this year also included a staff /faculty in-service on I 
AIDS within the school system and, in coordination with the Health | 
Coordinator at Brooks School, the development of an evening program j 
for parents which will provide education and discussion of topics J 
that are pertinent to parenting in today's world. 

The school health personnel are as follows: 

Cynthia Anthony, R.N., School/Town Nurse 
Anne Marie Mahoney, School Health Aide 
Laurel DiMatteo, School Health Aide 
Lynn Weigel, M.D. , School Physician 

4. Flu Clinic: 

Once again this year, members of the Board of Health, Town 
Nurse and volunteer nurse Diane Haessler administered influenza shots 
at the annual Flu Clinic. Sponsored by the Council on Aging, f lu { 
shots were provided to approximately 320 individuals. The Town Nurse-' 
also provided flu shots to some of Lincoln's homebound elderly. A 
one dollar voluntary contribution was requested of those receiving 
shots. 

5. Summary of Eliot Community Mental Health Center Activities: 

This facility provides services to Lincoln residents and 
includes an outpatient clinic, geriatric, mental retardation, and 
therapeutic preschool programs. In 1992 there were 293 direct 
service contacts for Lincoln residences. Nine towns participate ins 
funding these services and Lincoln's contribution to the Mental 
Health Center in 1992 was $3,750. 

6. Report of the East Middlesex Mosquito Control Project: 

The East Middlesex Mosquito Control Project conducts a program 
in Lincoln consisting of mosquito and wetland surveillance, water; 
management and public education. Lincoln's cost for the Project inj 
1992 was $7,700. 



82 



The goal of the surveillance program is to target mosquito 
breeding areas and to monitor changes in the adult mosquito 
population. Adult mosquito populations are determined regularly at 
three sites around the Town. This data aids the Project in 
determining the need for control. There was no program of aerial 
spraying of Bti this year. 

7. Summary of Animal Inspector's Activities: 

The Animal Inspector's responsibilities are to supply the 
Massachusetts Department of Food and Agriculture, Division of Animal 
Health, with a list of animal owners, the number of livestock, and 
general health of animals in the Town. 

A compilation of the 1992 animal census is as follows: 

Number of Dairy Herds (one animal constitutes a herd) 12 

Number of Beef Herds ( " ") 28 

Number of Swine Herds ( ") 18 

Number of Horses 72 

Number of Ponies 11 

Number of Donkeys 2 

Number of Mules 2 

Number of Sheep 120 

Number of Goats 4 

Number of Llamas 2 

Any dog known to have bitten a person must, by law, be 
quarantined for a period of 10 days in order to observe the animal 
for signs of rabies. The Inspector's reports of quarantines and 
findings thereof are sent to the State Department of Animal Health 
where they are kept on file for 7 years. 

Out-of-state cattle entering Massachusetts must have their ear 
tag numbers recorded by the Inspector and the numbers forwarded to 
the Division of Animal Health. 

If complaints arise with regard to the health or care of any 
livestock, the Animal Inspector investigates the circumstances in 
accordance with laws and regulations relating to animal health. 

Rabies epizootic is spreading to our area with great speed. 
There are several things homeowners can do to discourage wild animals 
from frequenting yards and approaching residences. Among these are: 
DO NOT FEED WILD ANIMALS, do not feed pets outdoors (food will 
attract wild animals), keep rubbish can lids securely fastened, and 
do not put garbage in plastic bags out in the open. If possible, cap 
chimneys with screens and seal openings in attics, basements, 
porches, etc. Bird food dropped from feeders also attracts raccoons. 



83 



DO NOT APPROACH ANY STRAY OR WILD ANIMAL. Especially alert 
children to heed this suggestion as the majority of animal bites are 
incurred by children. Common sense and precautions must prevail. In 
addition to raccoons, bats, red and grey fox, skunks, and especially 
groundhogs (woodchucks) are susceptible to rabies. Squirrels, 
rarely, birds and amphibians never. 

It is of utmost importance to be certain your dog or cat has a 
current rabies vaccination. Any unvaccinated dog or cat bitten or 
scratched by a possibly rabid animal must be euthanized and tested 
for rabies or quarantined and observed for rabies for a period of six 
months. Vaccination alone can prevent these drastic measures from 
becoming necessary. 

8. Rabies Clinic: 

Once again, the Board sponsored a rabies clinic for dogs and 
cats owned by Lincoln residents. In 1992, 6 dogs and 3 cats were 
vaccinated against rabies during clinic hours held on May 11th at the 
Town Barn. Dr. Gardiner Kenneson of Acton administered the 
innoculations. 



84 



COUNCIL ON AGING 

Albert Avery, Vice Chairperson 

Sally Chandler 

Marian Cook 

Shirley Drew 

Marie Gavin 

Allan Greaves 

Bea Grim 

Russell Mahan, Secretary/Treasurer 

Ruth Morey 

Wendy Palu 

Jackie Parker 

Barbara Cone, Chairperson 

Ruth Kramer, Director 

Liz King, Assistant to the Director 

The purpose of the Council on Aging is to provide activities 
and programs to enhance and enrich the lives of the elders as well as 
to solve individual problems if requested. It has been a busy year 
as always, with good attendance at all programs and activities. 

Eleven clinics for blood pressure and ten clinics for podiatric 
care were held and were well attended. The annual Flu Immunization 
Clinic coordinated with the Board of Health in November shows an 
increasing participation each year. The SHINE (Serving Health 
Information Needs for the Elderly) program with Al Avery serving as 
Counselor continues to grow as individuals become aware of the 
service provided. This program requires an advance appointment. 

Activities included weekly bridge playing, "beginners" classes 
in bridge playing, bowling, line dancing, "easy moves", and spring 
and fall walks. The varied bus trips covered places of interest and 
events and continue to be popular and very well attended. The 
bi-monthly Newsletter mailed to all residents publicizes all the 
programs and activities. 

This year several of the Town's talented artists and 
photographers have been successfully included in our programs. The 
"Coffee and Conversation" with special monthly programs continues to 
meet the varied interests of the elders. 

To help with the transportation needs of elders a taxi service, 
funded through a state formula grant, has been available for local 
medical appointments again this year. 

Due to Ruth Kramer, Director, and Liz King, her Assistant, 
together with the volunteers giving generously of their time, the 
programs continue to grow and be successful. 

As the elder population continues to grow, volunteers are vital 
to the success of all our programs. 



85 



MINUTEMAN HOME CARE (MHC) 

Ruth I. Morey, Board Member 

Minuteman Home Care (MHC) is a non-profit social service agency 
which assists persons 60 years and older to live in the dignity and 
comfort of their own homes and communities. The bulk of the 
Minuteman Home Care budget comes from State and Federal government 
funding sources. 

The State Home Care Program provides services such as case 
management, homemaking, chores, transportation, respite care for 
caregivers and some administrative expenses. 

Title III-B and Title III-C of the Older Americans Act provides 
federal funding for congregate meals and home -delivered meals 
programs, legal services, transportation services and innovative 
community projects. 

A portion of the MHC budget comes from sixteen member 
communities and private donations. These contributions are a 
critical part of the agency's support. Through payment of an annual 
"local share" Lincoln is entitled to be represented on the policy 
setting Board of Members of Minuteman Home Care which administers the 
services. The Board consists of twenty members and eight 
member s-at-large. During the 1992 fiscal year, the local share 
assessed to the Town of Lincoln was $468.00. Local shares are 
assessed to each community on a formula based on the number of people 
60 years of age and older living in the community. 

Lincoln's participation through the appointed Board member to 
Minuteman Home Care and its "local share" is vital to the continued 
success of Minuteman Home Care and provision of needed services to 
the elders in our region. 



86 



DOG OFFICER 

In March 1990, the Lincoln Board of Selectmen entered into a 
contract with Mr. Leslie Boardman to provide 24 hours/day, 365 
days/year dog officer services to the Town. The Dog Officer, or his 
agent, can be reached by calling the business phone at the Police 
Station. The dispatchers record all calls for the Dog Officer and 
the Dog Officer then picks up these messages each evening. 
Non-emergency callers can expect a return call within the next day. 
If the call is an emergency, the Dog Officer will be paged for an 
immediate response. 

After three years, Mr. Boardman is still the dog officer, and the 
program continues to run smoothly. It is clear that this would not 
be the case without the ongoing cooperation of the dispatchers and 
the Chief of Police. The Selectmen would also like to thank Mr. 
Boardman for his ongoing efforts. 

The Town of Lincoln held its annual Rabies Clinic May 30, 1992. 
Six dogs and three cats were innoculated. 

A reminder: Dog owners must now license their dogs by January 
1st of each year. Owners not licensing their dogs by April 1st will 
have a $5.00 fine added to the regular licensing fee. Licensing fees 
are as follows: 

Male/Female $10.00 
Spayed/Neutered 6.00 
Kennel License 25.00 (up to 4 dogs) 
Kennel License 50.00 (up to 10 dogs) 

Please remember, licenses make all the difference when trying to 
return a lost dog to its owner. 



87 



NORTH EAST SOLID WASTE COMMITTEE (NESWC) 
Henry J. Rugo, Town Representative 



The waste-to-energy plant in North Andover continued to operate 
above the contract-required level of efficiency throughout the year. 
The general reduction in waste volume delivered to the plant has had 
an adverse effect on the economics of the plant operation. Due to 
the continuing downturn in the economy and to improving diversion to 
the recycling program, the plant has produced less income to the 
project from the electrical power that is generated, with a 
consequent increase in the tipping fee. New tonnage that has been 
attracted to the plant by a variety of extraordinary measures has 
kept the tipping fee from being more adversely affected, but a more 
widespread and intensive marketing effort is needed to fill the plant 
to the optimum capacity. Effort in that direction continues. 

As the fraction of the waste stream that must be recycled 
increases, as required by state statute, the problem of filling the 
plant will become more severe. However, an improvement in the 
general economy and a more intensive marketing effort offer hope of I 
some relief. 

Actual transfer to NESWC of title to the plant site from the J 
Commonwealth has yet to be completed despite the earlier approval by 
the Governor. Completion of this desirable transaction will require 
further negotiation with the State's administrative machinery. The 
resignation of NESWC s Executive Director effective in October has 
retarded progress on this issue until a replacement can be recruited. 

Landfill capacity for the plant ash residue is sufficient for the 
remaining thirteen-year life of the present Service Agreement between * 
the contract communities and the plant operator. Completion of 
complex negotiations between NESWC and the owners /operators of the 
landfill sites has guaranteed capacity at an acceptable unit price 
per ton delivered. This approach assures the necessary capacity at a 
reasonable distance from the plant. It also frees NESWC of the 
problem of finding an acceptable site from the rapidly diminishing 
stock and the additional capital outlay for acquisition and 
development, as well as the continuing expense of operation. 

The prepayment of the so-called "UOP Stabilization Bond" that 
was negotiated by NESWC with the lender was completed in June. This 
NESWC initiative has saved the contract communities by avoiding the 
very expensive service costs of this loan (a saving of almost fclO per 
ton in tipping fee). 

Investment of construction bond reserves provides revenue to the 
project. NESWC assumed control of the investment portfolio in April 
1988 after negotiations with the contractor and the Trustee. From 
that time, the credit rating of the portfolio was significantly 



88 



improved, its liquidity more closely matched with NESWC s schedule of 
operations and the derived income was increased. By the end of this 
year, the appreciation in the value of the long-term instruments was 
realized in anticipation of the March 1993 refunding of the 
construction bonds. Including those gains, the net difference in 
revenues as a result of NESWC control, from April 1988 to the end of 
1992, was approximately $3.4 million (a saving of almost $4 per ton 
on the tipping fee) . 

Active representation of NESWC by the Executive Director 
resulted in a repeal of the statutory 3% set-aside (a saving in 
avoided cost of $4.50 per ton). 

Other representation by NESWC caused a change in the State 's 30B 
procurement regulations that permits NESWC to participate in the 
kinds of negotiation that are often needed to recruit additional 
sources of new tonnage to help fill the plant. It has already been 
possible to compete favorably for the waste stream of one town that 
did not qualify as a regular contract community. An additional 
avenue has been opened by this administrative change. 

The extended and time-consuming arbitration of the plant 
contractor's (MRI/WTI) claim against the contract communities was 
finally concluded by the finding that allows only a fraction of the 
original claim. Retroactively to the beginning of the Service 
Agreement for the full 20-year term, the award was less than 
one-quarter of the original claim. Instead of a possible penalty of 
$27 per ton on the tipping fee, the award allows an increase of 
approximately $6.50 per ton over the life of the contract (including 
retroactive interest). 

In the course of the claim arbitration discovery proceedings, 
evidence was revealed that the plant capacity had been significantly 
under-designed. Legal counsel is evaluating how NESWC communities 
can best pursue appropriate compensation for this error in contractor 
performance. The complexity of the technical issues involved is 
daunting, but there is some promise of mitigating the effect of the 
contractor claim as described above. 

Refinancing of the plant construction bonds, at their first call 
date of March, 1993, to take advantage of the present low 
interest-rate market, has been actively pursued during the entire 
year. At present it appears that these bonds can be sold before the 
end of January 1993. Unless there are unexpected and unusually 
abrupt adverse changes in interest rates, the present refunding can 
provide as much as $20 per ton reduction in tipping fee for the 
remaining life of the project when the bonds will have been fully 
retired. 

The one remaining expected capital cost to the project remains 
unresolved at the end of the year. Although the plant more than 
meets current State and Federal environmental regulations, more 



89 



stringent requirements are expected in the near future. NESWC has 

retained an internationally respected engineering consultant to 

perform a preliminary study to define the specifications of any 

addition to the plant that would be required. As a result, when the 
regulations have been fully promulgated, NESWC should be prepared to 

negotiate the specific design and costs with the plant contractor who 
will perform the actual installation. 

The Lincoln representative to NESWC resigned his position as 
Treasurer (and by implication, also as Chairman of the Financial 
Affairs Subcommittee). Prior to departing that post, he submitted an 
extensive report to the executive officers of the 23 contract 
communities defining the urgent need for a comprehensive review of 
NESWC f s management requirements, providing supporting arguments and 
an Initial analysis. Specific recommendations were made for further 
action. Favorable responses have been received from several sources, 
but further progress will require substantial additional effort. An 
offer of further assistance has been made toward retaining a 
competent management consultant. 

The Lincoln representative remains as member of the Advisory 
Board (appointed by the Selectmen) and of the Executive Committee 
(elected by the Advisory Board) until a replacement can be appointed. 

Questions and comments on the NESWC operation are invited. 



90 



LINCOLN RECYCLING COMMITTEE 

Abigail Avery 

Wesley Frost 

Hugo Liepmann 

Gwyn Loud 

Dorothy Yu-Brennaii 

Vicky Diadiuk, Chair 

As charged by the Selectmen, the Recycling Committee has 
continued to examine the cost and effectiveness of recycling solid 
waste items and materials. The recycling of newspaper, metal, and 
wood and of green and clear glass continues to be cost-effective, in 
that it represents a smaller expense to the Town than the NESWC 
tipping fees. The success in finding buyers for these materials has 
varied throughout the year. The finding of buyers depends on the 
efforts of DPW personnel, since the Committee has been explicitly 
excluded from negotiating with buyers. The Committee has maintained 
its advisory role, and, as such, has identified potential buyers. 

Salient developments in 1992 include: 

The newspaper market appears to have stabilized. An ongoing, 
fruitful relationship has been established with North Shore Recycled 
Fibers for newspaper collection. 

No office paper buyer was successfully contacted by the DPW. 
The Committee's recommendation that residents be allowed to take 
their office paper to Town Hall, where it is being collected for 
recycling, has, so far, not been adopted. Glass recovery continues 
to suffer from low quality control. Thus, it has been a continuing 
chore to find buyers. To raise the quality of the collected material 
and its marketability, organizations in Town were asked to volunteer 
to sort glass at the Transfer Station. Six courageous groups came 
forward, namely, Codman Community Farms, League of Women Voters of 
Lincoln, Lincoln Garden Club, Lincoln Grange, Lincoln Historical 
Society, and Lincoln Land Conservation Trust. As a result, glass 
recovery is now available on the first Saturday of each month when 
volunteers participate; and on weekdays when the low volume allows 
the sorting to be carried out by the Transfer Station attendants. 
The Committee thanks these organizations for their volunteer efforts 
and urges other Town organizations to join this volunteer project. 

The resultant non-availability of glass recycling on all but 
one Saturday a month is unacceptable in the framework of the 
State-wide bans scheduled to take effect in April 1993. The 
Committee, therefore, recommended: (a) that the number of hours the 
volunteers are present at the Transfer Station on each Saturday be 
reduced to the busiest time, so volunteers can cover more Saturdays, 
and (b) that the attendants' duties be shifted so more time can be 
devoted to glass and less to other, lower priority tasks. The 
solution of this problem rests with the Town. 



91 



A swap table started early this year has been an unmitigated I 
success, and runs mostly unattended. We commend Paul Harvey fori 
taking the initiative to leave the table open at all times and fori 
keeping it in working order. 

Seasonal collections of phonebooks by New England Telephone,! 
and of Christmas trees have been successful. The recovery of white 
goods, metals, and wood continues as usual. 

An opportunity might have presented itself to reduce the | 

Town's guaranteed annual tonnage (GAT) to NESWC. The Committee 

recommended a substantial reduction. The Town chose a more modest I 

number. Both efforts are presently academic, since NESWC did nofj 
implement the waiver of the GAT. 

Within its advisory role, the Committee has recommended 
repeatedly that the Town collect, for recycling, both cardboard and 
mixed-paper, including junk mail. These items represent a high; 
fraction of the Town's overall waste tonnage, and have reasonably 
good marketability. We urge the Town not to miss the opportunity* 
offered by North Shore Recycled Fibers to start collecting both of 
these items at zero cost to the Town. We warn the Town of thei, 
dangers of "analysis paralysis." 

The Committee is continuing to investigate the recycling of 
plastics, and looks forward in 1993 to industry developments thatj 
will enable the Town to recover these materials. 

In summary, the Town has made progress in its recycling program 
but much remains to be done before a fully effective materials, 
recovery plan is in place. 



92 



Planning and Public Works 



PLANNING BOARD 

Kenneth E. Basset t (resigned) 
E. Crawley Cooper (appointed) 
Ann Kessen Lowell (resigned) 
Dilla G. Tingley, Vice-Chairman 
Thomas C. Wang (appointed) 
James B. White 
M. Palmer Faran, Chairman 

For the Planning Board, 1992 has provided the opportunity to 
bring several projects to completion. We have been involved in the 
final releases on a number of subdivisions that were approved in 
prior years. For instance, Coburn Farm, a nine lot cluster, was 
finally signed off and is now built and occupied. The two lot 
cluster on the Umbrello Land off Route 117 was also completed. The 
nine lot Winchell subdivision, which was approved in 1991, has 
brought one dwelling unit to the Board for approval. These cluster 
subdivisions have required a great deal of time on the part of the 
Planning Board, but they have been successful developments and 
therefore rewarding to the Board and to the Town. 

On January 8, 1992, the Board gave final approval to Adler's 
Woods, Harold Adler's standard twelve lot subdivision modification, 
thus ending a long and difficult process. The infrastructure for 
this subdivision is now being built. Warbler Springs, ten years in 
progress, is nearly completed. Straddling the town lines of Lincoln 
and Weston, this development has required numerous lot line 
adjustments to accommodate the large dwellings desired by the buyers 
of these lots. 

The most recent subdivision approval has also been one of the 
most controversial, that is, the subdivision of land owned by Sarah 
Caldwell at 71 Weston Road. This is a two lot subdivision of a five 
acre parcel that already has one dwelling. It is the first cluster 
subdivision to be presented under the changed bylaw that reduced the 
cluster requirement from ten acres to four acres. On May 1, 1992, a 
standard subdivision plan was presented to the Board which proved 
density, i.e. the possibility of one additional lot on this land. 
Subsequently, a cluster plan was proposed, indicating the building 
envelopes, the open space and a trail easement along the driveway 
from Weston Road to Beaver Pond conservation land. The proposal 
aroused concern because of the small size of the lot and the fact 
that this was a test case for the new bylaw. During the long, open 
process, concerns of the neighborhood, constraints of the land, and 
changes required by the Planning Board were reflected on the cluster 



93 



subdivision plan and documents. On December 16, 1992, the plan was 
approved. 

As for Battle Road Farm, Phase II has now been finished and all 
units have been sold. The development team is still seeking 
financing for the Community Building and Phase III. Indications are 
encouraging that 1993 will see this mixed income housing completed. 

The Massachusetts Department of Public Works controls seven 
scattered lots of residentially zoned land in North Lincoln, and this 
year the DCPO (Division of Capital Planning & Operations) sent out a 
Request for Proposal for the purchase and development of this land. 
Fairview Realty has provisionally been designated as the developer. 
The proposal is based on two affordable units and four market rate 
units. 

One of the most successful projects in town, the Ryan Estate, 
is nearing completion. This development will provide twenty-four 
units of retirement housing. Approved by the Planning Board in 1990, 
financing didn't become available until this year and a 
groundbreaking ceremony took place on June 11, 1992. The developer, 
Bridgestone Associates, is projecting early spring occupancy. 

One example of the problems that have come before the Board is 
the Dooley land on Concord and Old Concord Roads. This is an 
existing subdivision consisting of six lots, two being too wet to be 
buildable. The owner presented to the Board a plan for a five lot 
subdivision, with the proposal to move to cluster once density was 
established. The Board was unwilling to accept the five lot density 
and rejected the plan. It is now up to the proponent to decide what 
to do. 

Out of its 1992 budget, the Planning Board has enabled the 
Library Trustees to develop a landscape plan with the help of Ron 
Wood, a landscape architect. This plan takes into account the 
requirements for handicapped parking, as well as lighting, and will 
be developed as money becomes available. 

In addition to subdivisions, accessory apartments also come 
under the purview of the Planning Board. Not as many applications 
were filed this year as in other years, but we did work to bring a 
pre-existing apartment into compliance. The Board also recommended 
that the Board of Appeals issue a special permit for an accessory 
apartment in an outbuilding that was less than fifty feet from the 
lot line. This special permit was the first to be granted under the 
change in the bylaw that allowed an accessory apartment to be built 
in an accessory building less than fifty feet from the rear or side, 
lot line. 

In the business district, the Board has been able to clean up 
some of the signs in problem areas. The signs for Joey's Auto and' 
Todd's Table have been approved and renovated. At 11 Lewis Street, \ 
with the change in tenancy, a new sign has been erected with thef 



94 



approval of the Board. The management agency at the Mall has brought 
a proposal to the Board for upgrading all the signs, the freestanding 
sign, and the signs on the buildings. For the first time, the Board 
approved a sign only for the summer months on Conservation Land. 
This sign was for a roadside farmstand, selling organically grown 
produce and located on Route 117 at the Umbrello Land. 

This year two members of the Planning Board resigned. Anne 
Kessen Lowell and Ken Bassett were involved in career decisions that 
required relocation. Anne served only a short time, but she was a 
bright spot on the Board and we wish her well. Ken has served the 
Town in various capacities, most recently as a member of the 
Conservation Commission and for five years as a member of the 
Planning Board. We will miss his calm approach at emotionally 
charged meetings, his ability to bring clear insight to land 
planning, and his wonderful humor. In June, two new members were 
appointed by the Selectmen to fill out their terms. Crawley Cooper, 
an architect, and Tommy Wang, a landscape architect, have joined the 
Board. We are all working together to build upon the base that was 
started many years ago by previous farsighted planning boards to 
realize the vision of this very special town. 



95 



BOARD OF APPEALS 

Despena F. Billings 

Morton B. Braun 

David P. Ries 

Andre M. Vagliano 

Margaret B. Marsh, Chairman 

Amalie Kass, Associate Member 

Fred John Solman, III, Associate Member 

The Board of Appeals hears and decides appeals from decisions 
of the Building Inspector, requests for special permits and requests 
for variances from the requirements of the Town Zoning By-law. The 
power and authority of the Board of Appeals is set forth in Chapter 
40A of the Massachusetts General Laws, in the Town By-law, in rules* 
and regulations thereunder, and in numerous court decisions- 
interpreting these statutes, rules and regulations. 

Any person who is aggrieved by reason of his inability to 
obtain a permit or enforcement action from the Building Inspector i 
pursuant to Section 8 of Chapter 40A of the General Laws, is, 
entitled, pursuant to Section 20.2(b) of the By-law, to appeal that < 
decision to the Board of Appeals. The Board follows applicable rules* 
and regulations in hearing these appeals. 

The Board also hears requests for special permits for accessory 
apartments, for the conduct of certain occupations in residences, for', 
the operation of commercial business in Town, for the change or 
alteration of nonconforming uses or structures, and for such other 
subjects as the By-law provides. The By-law requires that, before 
granting any request for a special permit, the Board of Appeals shall 
determine that the use for which such permit is requested is inj 
harmony with the general purposes and intent of the By-law and thaf' 
the proposed use is not detrimental or injurious to persons or 
property. In addition, the permit must meet the requirements of the 
specific section of the By-law with respect to which it is being 
requested. 

The third area of the Board's jurisdiction is to hear requests, 
for variances. Unlike special permits, variances run with the land. 
Requests for variances present a special problem, since the Board's 
power to grant them is constrained by state law. The criteria upon 
which variance requests must be judged have also changed considerably 
over the years. As provided in Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 
40A, Section 10, and Section 20.2(d) of the By-law, a variance may be 
granted only if, owing to the circumstances relating to soil 
conditions, shape, or topography of the land or structure: (1) a 
literal enforcement of the By-law would involve substantial hardship 
to the person seeking the variance; and (2) a variance would not.] 
cause substantial detriment to the public good; and (3) a variance*) 
would not nullify or substantially depart from the intent or purpose.. 



96 



of the By-law. In interpreting this statute, the Massachustts 
appellate courts have held consistently that, since variances are 
always in derogation of the zoning system adopted by the town, "they 
are to be granted sparingly" . Pendergast v. Board of Appeals of 
Barnstable , 331 Mass. 555, 557 (1954); Demaskos v. Board of Appeals 
of Boston , 27 Mass. App. Ct. 754, 755 (1989); Guiragossian v. Board 
of Appeals of Watertown , 21 Mass. Ap. Ct. Ill, 115 (1985). Many 
persons seeking a variance assert "substantial hardship" as the basis 
for their request, only one criteria which the Board of Appeals must 
consider. However, the courts have found substantial hardship to 
exist only where the development or use permitted by the By-law would 
be economically unfeasible for anyone, not merely expensive. 

The Board of Appeals considers closely the facts of each 
individual case which comes before it, and interprets those facts in 
light of the By-law's own language. In this way, the Board attempts 
to strike an often difficult balance between granting the requested 
relief to an individual and upholding the integrity of the Zoning 
By-law enacted by all of the Town's residents. 

There were 9 applications filed, 9 hearings scheduled, 19 
renewals published during 1992 as follows. 



March 2 - CYNTHIA F. EVANS, 135 LEXINGTON ROAD special 
permit for apartment 



WITHDRAWN 



April 27 - LINCOLN AUTOMOTIVE, INC. 170 SOUTH GREAT ROAD 

special permit for non-conforming use GRANTED 

June 1 - GILES DILG, 11 LEWIS STREET special permit for 

business, tenant change GRANTED 

July 20 - LYNN WEIGEL & CHARLES KEEVIL, 233 CONCORD ROAD 

modification of special permit GRANTED 

September 14- MONIQUE LUIJBEN, 244 CONCORD ROAD special permit 

for apartment GRANTED 

KATHY LEE & MICHAEL MORITZ, 135 LEXINGTON ROAD 

special permit for apartment GRANTED 

October 26 - SCOTT A. LATHROP 7 BEATRICE HEVERNAN, 148 WESTON 

ROAD special permit to maintain setbacks GRANTED 

December 28- STEPHEN J. SAKOWICH, 99 TOWER ROAD special 
permit to maintain setbacks 
JONATHAN C. CUNNINGHAM, TRUSTEE SEVEN WOODCOCK 
LANE REALTY TRUST special permit to locate 
pool closer than 20 feet frm lot line 



97 



RENEWALS 



Rauielle & Thomas B. Adams, 37 Baker Farm - Apartment. 

Alan Bachrach, Jr. 6 Brooks Road - Veterinary office 

John & Irene Briedis, 27 Canaan Drive - Apartment 

Mary J. Brogna , 99 Trapelo Road - Apartment 

Susan Brooks & Eric Harris, 138 Bedford Road - Apartment 

Roger M. Burke, 9 Tabor Hill Road - Apartment 

Giles Dilg, Lewis Street - Woodworking business 

David Donaldson, 22 Weston Road - Apartment 

Warren F. Flint, Jr., Lexington Road - Business 

John LeGates, Bedford Road - Apartment 

Paul E. Marsh, Bedford Road - Apartment 

Rita & Luciano Mascari, 29 Deerhaven Road - Apartment 

Massachusetts Audubon Society, South Great Road - Charitable usei 

Ronald J. McDougald , 22 Lincoln Road - Apartment 

Peter Pantazelos, Woodcock Lane, - Apartment 

Barry L. Solar, 152 Trapelo Road - Apartment 

Richard Wiggin, Winter Street - Apartment 



98 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Peter Conrad 
Jonathan Donaldson 
Christopher Klem 
Tar a Tracy 
Christopher White 
Joan Kimball, Chairman 

The Conservation Commission continues its work which includes 
permitting of work within 100 feet of wetlands under the 
Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act and the Town of Lincoln 
Wetlands Protection Bylaw; creating policies relating to Conservation 
Land, trails and farmland fields; managing the lands; creating Open 
Space Plans and maps; and protecting land through various means 
including, conservation restrictions and easements. The Commission 
wants to take this opportunity to express its appreciation for 
landowners who have restricted building on portions of their 
properties and who have given permission for people to use trails on 
their properties. The Commission is deligjhted to note the 
publication of the Lincoln Land Conservation Trust's Trail Guide 
which will enhance outdoor experiences for both experienced trail 
users and new ones. 

This year the Commission saw many changes in membership. 
Long-time members Tom Billings, Claire Cunningham and Nathalie Rice 
resigned from the Commission. The resignations of the two former 
chairmen, Tom Billings and Claire Cunningham, were occasioned by 
friction dealing with the central Town office staff over personnel 
issues. Tom Billings contributed a keen knowledge of legal issues 
and a willingness to delve deeply into issues ranging from mosquito 
control to farmland rentals to baseball fields. Claire Cunningham 
served as fiscal consultant for the Commission on issues ranging from 
financing the protection of Flint Fields to yearly budget 
considerations; she served as chairman of the Pesticide Review 
Subcommittee, and she brought her inquiring mind to all our 
Commisssion work. Nadie Rice, a professional wetlands biologist, was 
a stalwart on the Wetlands Subcommittee, contributed professional 
mapping experience and her remarkable knowledge of the land in 
Lincoln and the history of issues relating to it. These three 
members, all of whom put in many hours of extra time for the Town, 
will be missed by the Town and the Conservation Commission. The 
Commission welcomes Tara Tracy, Chris White and Peter Conrad and 
appreciates their considerable contributions within the last six 
months . 

PLANNING AND ADMINISTRATION 

Open Space Activities ; The Commission recommended priorities for 
possible open space acquisition in view of the Town's circumstances, 
which appear to indicate an increasing role for private financing of 
acquisition activities. Ongoing discussions were held concerning the 



99 



possible grant of several potentially significant conservation 
restrictions. A restriction was proposed on the Caldwell property as 
part of a cluster approval under the Town's Zoning Bylaw. 

The Commission participated with the Water Board and the 
Selectmen In the site selection process for the proposed water 
disinfectant plant required by the terms of the Town's waiver from 
filtration procedures for the public water supply at Flint's Pond. 
Several of the most logical sites involved conservation land. Due to 
the close relationship of watershed protection to general 
conservation interests, the Commission concluded that use of existing 
conservation land for a disinfection plant, and possibly a filtration 
plant in the future, may be appropriate, given proper siting and due 
regard for protection of other conservation values. 

Wetlands ; The Conservation Administrator, or Commission members in 
the absence of the Administrator, receives numerous requests for 
assistance from both residents and developers. These requests are 
made relative to the Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act, the Town 
of Lincoln Wetlands Protection Bylaw and the public interests which 
Lincoln's wetlands function to protect (e.g., public water supplies, 
flood control, wildlife habitat). Fulfillling these requests can 
require map and file research within Town Hall, preliminary field 
inspections to determine the presence or absence of wetlands on a 
site, and/or local regulations. More often than not the landowner or 
developer's needs are met without going through the formal regulatory 
process. The Commission held 16 public hearings under the Wetland 
Protection Act and the Lincoln Bylaw. Work of the Commission 
includes preliminary meetings with the applicants to discuss the 
proposed project , the regulations under the Act and the Bylaw. The 
Commission holds hearings and writes permits for work. The 
Commission is responsible for assuring that the work is carried out 
in accordance with the requirements of the permit which the 
Commission writes. Proposed work which has come before the 
Commission this year includes new houses, house additions, pools, 
pond restorations and several municipal projects. 

Staffing : The Commission is pleased to enjoy the continued services 
of Michael Murphy, Conservation Land Manager. There have been 
several changes in other positions and position eliminations within 
the department over the past few years. The Commission extends its 
thanks and support to Mike who has had to adapt to budget mandated 
reductions of Land Management crew from 3 in FY '91, to 2 in FY '92, 
to just himself this fiscal year. With the staff reductions, Mike 
has successfully coordinated some of his land maintenance activities 
with crews from the DPW. We value Mike's experience, his knowledge 
of the Town's 1400 acres of Conservation land and its 57 miles of 
trails, and his sensitive approach to the care of the land. The 
Commission regretfully accepted the resignation of Conservation 
Administrator, JoAnne Carr. The Commission has missed her excellent 
administration of Commission work including wetland permitting, 
farmland rentals and open space issues. After a five month search 



100 



and screening of 134 applicants, the Commission welcomes our new 
Conservation Administrator, Geoff McGean. Mr. McGean comes to the 
Commission with a Master* s Degree from Yale and three years 
experience with the Environmental Protection Agency on Superfund 
issues. The Commission also appreciates the enthusiastic services of 
Chief Ranger Dan Reppucci and ranger staff. Joining the Commission 
last summer, Mr. Reppucci has spent considerable thought in 
coordinating the head ranger position with other agencies in the 
Town. 

The Commission would like to thank the Selectmen's staff and Town 
Hall staff for their help during the five months without an 
administrator. The Commission would like to single out Planning 
Board Administrator, Liz Corcoran, who took over much of the office 
work with professionalism and cheerfulness during those five months. 
We also benefited from Susan Harding's accurate rendering of 
Commission minutes during our lengthy meetings and from Frank Emmons ' 
coverage for a two week period this summer. Finally, the Commission 
would like to thank the members of the Wetlands Subcommittee, Tara 
Tracy and Chris White, for the extra work they contributed in the 
absence of the Administrator. 

Ranger Program ; The Lincoln Conservation Rangers continue to be a 
valuable source of information and safety to residents and visitors 
who use the conservation lands in Town. In 1992, user visits during 
the summer months totalled approximately 14,100. During the busy 
summer months, Chief Ranger Dan Reppucci and seasonal rangers Jane 
Lay ton, Tom Kowalski and Diana Ryan instituted a split shift schedule 
to give greater daily coverage to all the conservation lands in the 
Town. The area of greatest enforcement difficulty continues to be 
controlling human and dog access to Flint's Pond. The Chief Ranger 
led a successful July 4th guided sunset walk through the Lincoln 
woods and continues to work towards offering other interpretive and 
educational activities for users of Lincoln's conservation lands. 

The donation boxes at the Mount Misery, Schools, and Lincoln 
Woods parking lots continue to be sources of support for the Ranger 
Program. Money contributed to these boxes helps offset the costs of 
the Ranger Program and trail maintenance. Additional income is also 
collected through group user fees; together these two revenue sources 
combined to make approximately $1,054. 

Farmland Program ; Under the direction of Mr. Billings, farmland 
contracts were revised to be in compliance with the new state 
procurement law. The contracts were extended to five years and were 
put out to bid in two installments. A total of 176 acres is leased 
to six farmers for the next five years resulting in a revenue of 
$4,141 per year. 

j As manager of the lands, the Commission sees its role to be good 
stewards of the land by rotating crops, by watching over pesticide 
and fertilizer use, and by ensuring that good practices occur on the 



101 



land. For the first t Lme this year, there was considerable 
competition for the fields and decisions of whom to award the fields 
were diffLcult. The final decisions were based on what was believed 
to be best for the land. The Commission currently rents fields to 
hay farmers, vegetable farmers and two organic farmers. In addition, 
because of the boom in the raccoon population, one of the farmers 
reported difficulty in controlling the raccoons and protecting his 
sweet corn crop. After a public meeting, the Commission decided that 
lessee farmers should consult with the Commission about problems 
created by burgeoning animal populations and ways of dealing with 
them. 

CONSERVATION LAND MANAGEMENT 

Trails : All trailheads in Town were marked with a uniform post 
and number system. The Fire Department personnel were trained by the 
Land Manager on the use of the Emergency Vehicle Access System. 
Certain trails were marked and designated "No Bike" trails; these 
trails are closed to bikes because they are either sensitive wetland 
trails subject to severe degradation, or trails that are on private 
property subject to owner restriction. A successful project using 
Lincoln Guide Service volunteers took place this year. Mike Farny and 
staff members approached the Commission with a proposal to help 
maintain trails. With the involvement of L.G.S. staff and 
volunteers, several water bars were installed in Codman Forest and 
Pine Hill, trails were covered with wood chips, and some signs were 
constructed. We look forward to engaging in similar work with 
Lincoln Guide Service and other volunteer groups in the future. 

Fields : On the Sandy Pond Trust parcels (fields west of the 
pumping station), field edges were cleared of brush and vines, the 
Red Pine plantations were pruned, and the open fields were rotary 
mowed. Continued mowing took place throughout the Town in 18 
different locations. This mowing involves annual open field work and 
agricultural field edge clearing on Town-owned Conservation parcels, 
School property, Pierce Park, and L.L.C.T. property. 

Woodlands : On the Baker Bridge parcel, Sugar Maple saplings 
were thinned to allow growing space for the trees in this "sugar 
bush". At Pine Hill, the White Pines that were released in a 
previously approved and executed forestry operation were pole pruned 
and thinned. 

Town Plantings and Tree Care : Lincoln Tree Service donated a 
Bradford Pear to the Town as part of the Fourth of July celebration; 
this tree was planted at the Canoe Landing overflow parking lot area. 
At the Pierce House, Arborvitae were planted to replace overgrown Yew 
bushes on the northern end of the house, several trees were correctly 
pruned, and ornamental plantings were cared for. The Towns 7 
remaining Elm trees were injected with fungicide as a preventative 
measure against the ever persistent Dutch Elm Disease. 



102 



Other Projects : Completion of the Codrnan Road roadside path 
took place. With the help of the D.P.W. men and equipment, the base 
construction for this important trail/bikepath is now complete. 
Construction was carried out within the wetland buffer-zone in 
compliance with the W.P.A. and Conservation Commission guidelines. 
Further upgrading with possible paving will make for a scenic path 
traversing Codrnan fields and woodland. Three high use area parking 
lots were maintained by surface grading of parking areas. In 
addition, brush and grass were cleared along the roadside for better 
visibility at the entrances. The Baker Bridge brush dump continued 
operation; open to Lincoln residents on the first Saturday each month 
from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. for the deposition of brush and leaves. Leaf 
compost material is now available for pick-up at the brush dump 
during normal operating hours. Other projects include: litter 
pick-up, steel gate manufacturing and replacement, vehicle and 
chainsaw maintenance, firewood sales and deliveries, snow removal on 
public roads and parking areas, erosion control, and sign work 
involving both new and replacement signs. 



103 



IHB LINCOLN LAND CONSERVATION TRUST 

Robert C. Brannen 

Paul Brooks 

Margaret P. Flint 

William A. King, Secretary 

Gwyneth Loud 

Samuel G. Mygatt 

Paul J. Svetz, Treasurer 

Robert H. Webb 

William G. Constable, Chairman 

The Lincoln Land Conservation Trust (LLCT) celebrated its active 
1992 year with the publication of A Guide to Conservation Land in 
Lincoln . The Guide is the first compendium of geological, biological 
and cultural descriptions of the permanently conserved parcels of 
conservation land in Lincoln. The 150 page paperback was produced 
through the creative, talented perseverance of Gwyn Loud and her 
committee of Margaret Flint, Nadie Rice, Paul Brooks and the 
Chairman. David Ford's design and production assistance incorporated 
the art work of Paul Brooks and Scott Hecker, the research and 
writing of Ann Prince-Hecker, Harris Roen and Amy Wales, and the 
efforts of many, many historians, bird watchers, Town officials and 
other naturalists who contributed to this volume. Lorraine Fiore 
Browne has gathered a cadre to distribute the Guide to several 
outlets. The Guide may be purchased in Lincoln at the Lincoln Town 
Hall, the Old Town Hall Exchange, the Lincoln Guide Service, 
Massachusetts Audubon Gift Shop, Something Special and the Three S 
Pharmacy, each of whom have generously contributed any profit from 
their sales to the LLCT. 

Stewardship of LLCT lands and trails also relies upon volunteer 
activities, supplemented in 1992 through efforts of the veteran LLCT 
trail crew of William Rizzo and Owen Hughes. Volunteer work days 
such as the ones coordinated by abutters to, and friends of, the Page 
Road conservation land provide vital land management. Through the 
efforts of the Page Road team, new cattle-proof fences were 
installed, trails maintained, stone walls uncovered and pastures 
improved for the Codman Community Farms' devon cattle which now graze 
there. Other organized volunteer efforts include those coordinated 
by the Lincoln Guide Service to rehabilitate those trails which bear 
the greatest burden of use. The most important volunteer 
conservation efforts in Lincoln, however, are the many users of the 
trails, whose individual stewardship combine to keep the trails clean 
and safe. 

Throughout the past year, the LLCT has participated in the 
efforts to acknowledge and protect Walden Woods, that portion of 
Lincoln and Concord identified as such by Thoreau. Working with the 
Concord Land Conservation Trust, the Department of Environmental 
Management and the Walden Woods Project, efforts have continued to 
define land management guidelines for the important symbol of our 
natural and cultural heritage. In addition, the LLCT continues to be 



104 



recognized. in the larger land conservation community through active 
roles in the National Land Trust Alliance and the newly created 
Massachusetts Land Trust Coalition. 

The efforts of the Lincoln Land Conservation Trust complement, 
and are in turn assisted by, the efforts of the Lincoln Conservation 
Commission and its staff. Coordination between the LLCT and the 
Commision continues to prosper, including continued payments from the 
LLCT Flint Fields' Fund, administration of the conservation 
restriction program and maintenance of our interlocked trail 
systems. Of particular note in 1992 was the joint decision to limit 
bicycling on environmentally sensitive trails, in recognition of the 
damage which has been caused by the explosive growth in off -road 
bicycling in recent years. Signposts were provided by the LLCT and 
Conservation Commission rangers have been authorized to enforce bike 
prohibitions on Lincoln trails. 

While Lincoln continues to have a conservation program and a 
publicly accessible trail system admired throughout the country, 
continued efforts must be applied to preserve remaining sensitive 
natural resources, to connect natural areas for biological and 
recreational linkages, to provide educational opportunities and to 
maintain the fields and forests which are the hallmark of Lincoln's 
remarkable environment . 



105 



LLCT - 1992 



Balance: 12/31/91 










Harvard Trust 


15,198.97 








Fidelity Daily Income Trust 


11,582.38 








Fidelity Cash Reserves 


21,049.22 








Jean W. Preston Memorial 


14,464.83 








Securities 


1,120.00 








Lincoln Conservation Fund 


418,847.05 












$482 , 


,262 


.45 


Received: 










Contributions: 


14,649.48 








Sale of Trail Maps 


1,888.54 








Dividends & Miscellaneous 


316.86 








Sale of Conservation Guides 


2,446.00 








Interest: 










Harvard Trust 


447.55 








Fidelity Daily Income Trust 


415.89 








Fidelity Cash Reserves 


788.67 








J. W. P. Memorial Fund 


541.89 








Lincoln Conservation Fund 


15,081.16 












$ 36 ; 


,576 


.04 


Expenses: 










Wages & Supplies 


6,778.94 








Equipment & Repairs 


1,473.65 








Insurance 


1,031.00 








Printing & Postage 


1,995.39 








Legal & Filing Fees 


25.00 








Social Security Taxes 


676.37 








Conservation Guide Expenses 


13,489.98 








Mowing & Miscellaneous 


107.25 












* 25, 


577, 


.58 


Balance: 12/31/92 










Harvard Trust 


9,369.72 








Fidelity Daily Income Trust 


11,998.27 








Fidelity Cash Reserves 


21,837.89 








Jean W. Preston Memorial Fund 


15,006.82 








Securities 


1,120.00 








Lincoln Conservation Fund 


433,928.21 












$493, 


260, 


.91 



106 



1989 Conservation Fund (Flints* Field Fund) 



Balance: 12/31/91 $482,435.27 

1991 Donations & Interest $ 59,482.47 
Payment to Town of Lincoln 230,610.00 



Balance: 12/31/92 $311,307.74 



107 



HOUSING COMMISSION 

Lee Harrison 
Katharine Preston 
Susanne Werner 
Giles Browne, Chairman 

In 1992, the Housing Commission welcomed Katharine Preston as a 
newly-elected member and also accepted with regret the formal 
resignation of 10-year E.O.C.D. appointee, Ray Johnson. Ray's 
contributions to the Commission were many and his expertise 
exceptional. In December, the Commission and the Selectmen 
nominated, as his replacement, Tom Black of Storey Drive. His 
expeditious appointment by the Secretary of the Executive Office of 
Communities and Development will allow us to start 1993 with a full 
complement of Commission members. 

Also during 1992, the Commission lost our clerk, Jeanne Survell , 
due to force reductions in Town Offices. Jeanne's energy and 
enthusiasm are noteworthy, and we were pleased that she promptly 
found other employment here in Lincoln. Her duties were assumed by 
Alyson Morse Katzman, who added them to an already full job. Alyson 
has served the Commission with her typical professionalism, and it 
was with regret that we learned of her plans to leave full time work 
at the Town Offices in February 1993. Ray, Jeanne, and Alyson will 
all be missed. 

Operations 

The Commission has continued to administer seven Town-owned and three 
Town-leased residential units with the intent of bringing all leases 
and rents into fair and consistent application, given the 
(confidential) circumstances of each tenant. 

The Social Worker for the Codman Farmhouse Congregate Living units 
submitted her resignation this year; Nancy Bartlett served these 
tenants and the Town well ever since the selection process began for 
the first residents. Her replacement, Paula Doherty, will begin her 
duties in early 1993, meeting the three (soon to be four) tenants and 
proceeding as required. 

Proposed Legislation 

The 1992 Town Meeting sent to the Legislature a request for the 
enactment of legislation allowing the Town to convert the Housing 
Commission to a Housing Authority. Ihis action will allow Lincoln 
access to funds not available to Commissions, when state funds become 
available. On the last day of the 1992 Legislative session, 
Lincoln's bill, which had passed the House, failed to come to a vote 
in the Senate. This bill has already been re-filed for the 1993 
Legislative session, and the Commission will work closely with our 
legislators to see that it successfully passes the current session. 



108 



1993 Agenda 

The Housing Commission has identified several areas of interest for 
1993: 

* Approval by EOCD of the change in mix at Battle Road Farm, 
Phase III. 

* Exploring ways to increase the number of affordable accessory 
apartments in town, as defined by State guidelines. Potential 
tenants could be Town employees, people who work in Lincoln, or those 
with Lincoln connections. 

* Analysis of the data received from the 1992 Housing 
Questionnaire. 

* In light of the Town's longstanding agreement with the State, 
continue working to sustain over 10% affordable housing. 

* Consideration of increased diversity in the housing mix in 
Lincoln. 



109 



WATER COMMISSIONERS 

Leona Champeny 

Gabriel Farrell 

Andrew F. Hall, III, Chairman 

1992 has been a good year for the Water Department. The 
timetable for the completion of the contact chamber is on schedule. 
In March 1992, the Town approved funding for design of the contact 
chamber and the commencement of the pilot study. Our engineers, 
Weston & Sampson, undertook the pilot study and initially 
investigated eight potential sites for locating the contact chamber. 
The site selection process has now been reduced to three locations 
and hopefully in January 1993, a final site will be selected. At 
that time, Weston & Sampson will proceed with the plans which will be 
submitted to the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) for 
their approval in August 1993. 

In March 1994, we plan to request Town Meeting approval for the 
funding of the contact chamber. Construction will then commence in 
April 1994. We anticipate completion of the project in early 1995. 
The DEP is currently trying to accelerate completion to December 31, 
1994. However, that appears unrealistic, recognizing that it is the 
dead of winter. At this point, the timetable is under control and we 
will comply with whatever the mandate, as the alternative is 
filtration, and this is even more expense. 

On an operating basis, our operating expenses are under control 
and our annual billings continue to increase as we distribute more 
water. The accomplishments of the Water Department under the 
direction of Pat Allen, Water Department Superintendent, were 
recently acknowledged by an award from the DEP for the Town's ability 
to consistently provide a quality water supply. We are very pleased 
with the recognition being given to Pat and his crew. The Water 
Department continues to systematically flush the system in the spring 
and fall, exercises all gate valves and replaces fire hydrants as 
needed. This systematic approach to maintaining the system has 
substantially improved every home's water quality. 

In 1993, we will continue to evaluate with Weston & Sampson the 
alternatives for reducing the iron content in the Farrar Pond Well. 
We will also continue to expand the water distribution system where 
it is economically feasible and in the best interest of maintaining 
the Town's water quality. We also plan to work diligently to 
continue abiding by current regulations and drinking water guidelines 
in an effort to minimize capital expenditures which would represent a 
burden to all Lincoln residents through increased water rates. 

On behalf of the present Water Commissioners, we want to 
acknowledge the fine work of Rob DeNormandie these past years and 
wish him the best with his new responsibilities as Selectman. 



110 



Statistics as of December 31, 1992 





Beginning 
of Year 


Additions 


End of Year 


Miles of water main 
Hydrants in use 
Gates in use 
Blow-offs 
Services in use 


54.26 

455.0 

654.0 

53.0 

1,610.0 


1.16 
11 
27 


22 

1991 


55.44 

466 

681 

53 

1,632 


Spring Billing 
Fall Billing 


54.1 
93.6 


million gallons 
million gallons 

1992 


$210,176 
$361,201 


Spring Billing 
Fall Billing 


70.5 
92.1 


million gallons 
million gallons 


$219,328 
$322,234 



111 



l: uuijJ.vj v»V-/i\j\.iJ L/ut ruuiujiii 



Vincent R. DeAmicis, Superintendent, Department of Public Works 

I am pleased to report to you the accomplishments of the past. 
The major projects are as follows: 

1. 86 roadside trees and 18 trees in the cemetery were removed. 

2. Floor drains at the DPW Building, Lewis Street, were removed 
and new concrete floors were poured (150 c.y.). 

3. 216 man-hours were spent assisting the Conservation 
Department, 631 man-hours assisting the Water Department and 
134 man-hours doing repair work at the Pierce House. 

4. The transfer station road was paved. 

5. The bathroom at Sunnyside Lane was renovated. 

6. 869 tons of hot top and cold patch were applied to Town roads. 

7. All Police, Fire, Conservation, Water and Highway vehicles 
were maintained by the DPW. 

8. 372 miscellaneous work orders were completed. 



As always, the accomplishments of the department can only be 
achieved by the efforts of the employees and the assistance and 
cooperation of many others. My thanks to all. 



112 



PIERCE PROPERTY COMMITTEE 

Lynn Donaldson 
Judith C. F. Gross 
William Shea, Chairman 

Dawn Murphy, Pierce House Manager 

Over the past three years, major restoration of the 93 year old 
house continues slowly but on schedule. Rebuilding of porches, 
columns and roofs, which has resulted in interior ceiling water 
damage, is in the final phase of completion. 

A commercial refrigerator was installed in the kitchen to provide 
necessary storage space for food and beverages for major functions. 

To minimize parking along the driveway lawns, the rear parking 
lot has been expanded and graded by the Town Department of Public 
Works. A plan will be developed to organize the parking pattern so 
as to accommodate the maximum number of vehicles. 

In spite of the sluggish economy, reservations for functions at 
the Pierce House continue at a very normal rate. We are very pleased 
to have the house in such demand by both Lincoln residents, as well 
as guests from other communities. 



113 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

Martha DeNormandie 

John C. MacLean 

Marjorie L. Holland, Chairman 

Agents: Warren F. Flint, Sr. 
Nancy J. Zuelke 

In March of 1992, the Commission suffered the loss of its 
newest member, Dr. George P. Faddoul. During his all too brief 
tenure, Dr. Faddoul contributed generously of his time and talents; 
we remain most grateful for his dedicated interest and service. John 
C. ("Jack") MacLean, appointed by the Selectmen in June, has joined 
the Commission, and is most heartily welcomed. 

Followng an incident of vandalism last winter, when a number of 

gravestones were overturned, police patrols have been increased. We 

commend the Department of Public Works for the immediate resetting of 

the stones affected, and we feel most fortunate that there was no 
permanent damage. 

Over the summer months, designated trees and brush along 
Lexington Road, including in the cemetery, were removed or pruned. 
We wish to thank the Department of Public Works and the Conservation 
Commission for their help and care in so maintaining the cemeteries' 
plantings, grounds, and setting. 

Landscape architect Max Mason graciously consented to work with- 
the Commission on revitalizing the Arbor Vitae Cemetery's 
landscaping. Based upon his detailed proposal, many of the dead 
trees and branches were removed, while flowering and other shrubs 
will be added beginning in the spring of 1993. In addition, Acton 
Monument Co. was contracted to repair or restore some of the older' 
markers at Arbor Vitae. 

At the recommendation of the Commission, the Town has signed a. 
contract for engineering and surveying services, including 
computerized cemetery maps, with the BSC Group. These plans are to 
be completed by June 1993, financed through cemetery funds. In 
response to the Town's request, the Commission also voted to transfer 
$5,000 from the Cemetery Improvement Fund and $650 from the interest 
earned in the Perpetual Care Fund to the Town's General Fund in FY94. 

As part of an ongoing project, Warren Flint's account of 
Lincoln's first cemetery, the "Precinct Cemetery," follows this 
report. This ancient cemetery, with its interesting examples of! 
eighteenth-century folk-art carving, is the oldest section of the! 
Lexington Road Cemetery. Here, the Lincoln Minute Men and others 
perform a poignant memorial ceremony each April, and we hope Warren's 
account encourages you to join with them in visiting and appreciating 
this historic and beautiful piece of our community's shared heritage 



114 



The Cemetery Rules and Regulations (updated October 1992) are 
available at the Town Offices for owners and prospective purchasers 
of cemetery lots. 

There were 10 lots sold and 21 interments in 1992. 



Precinct Cemetery 
Prepared by Warren F. Flint, Sr. 

In 1735 this community was very sparsely settled. It 
represented for the most part families living on the outskirts of 
what was then Concord, Weston and Lexington. These early settlers 
had an independence of spirit which motivated a group of them to 
petition the General Court for a separate town. After twelve years 
of study and petitioning, the General Court approval for the Second 
Precinct of Concord was allowed in 1746. By then, some twenty or 
more families had started building a meetinghouse on the site where 
the Stone Church now stands. 

It was customary at this period to "have a burial ground near 
the meetinghouse. However, it is speculated that there was so much 
animosity about the new community that Edward Flint, who gave the 
site for the new meetinghouse, refused to give or sell a site for a 
burial ground nearby. The result was that his nephew, Ephraim Flint, 
gave an acre of land, off what is now Lexington Road, about half a 
mile from the meetinghouse. 

This burial ground is now referred to as the first community 
burial ground or the "Precinct Cemetery", and it was formally 
accepted by the community in 1748. The area was fenced and the first 
interment was that of Jonathan Gove, in 1747. Early families who 
used this burying ground included: Abbot, Bemis, Benjamin, Brooks, 
Brown, Child, Flint, Goodnow, Gove, Hartwell, Headley, Mason, Parks, 
Stone, and Wheeler. 

The families chose the southwest portion of this rectangular 
acre for their interments. The east corner of the plot was used for 
servants of the families, and for others who had no attachment to 
these families; examples are Sippio Brister, "a man colour"; five 
British soldiers; and others who are surmised to have been interred 
there . 

On April 20, 1775, the day after the Lexington and Concord 
battle, the five British soldiers who were killed in the fighting in 
north Lincoln were brought by ox cart to this cemetery for burial. 
They were placed in a common grave with no identification above the 
interment. In 1884, one hundred and nine years later, the Town felt 
that there should be a monument recognizing them. A monument was 
erected on what was thought to be the burial site. In 1942, when 
preparation for a contemporary interment was being made nearby, the 



115 



bur Lai agent discovered the bodies of the five British soldiers about 
fifty feet from the monument erected in their memory, and indentified 
them as such by fragments of cloth and buttons from their uniforms. 

The gravestones in this old burying ground are largely of 
slate, measuring generally 2 1/2 - 4 feet high, 1 1/2 - 2 1/2 feet 
wide, and 1 1/2 - 3 inches thick. There are a few monuments of 
marble, sandstone, or granite of more recent vintage. There are a 
few Instances where two small rocks, set on edge, at head and foot, 
identify the interment of a small child or baby. 

Gravestones of this period were important for their symbols and 
verses, and frequently there was an expression of philosophy and 
faith. The beauty of the carvings, for they were the earliest and 
for a long time the only forms of sculpture in New England, must have 
satisfied a desire for artistry and beauty. Today these monuments 
are a valuable source of historical and genealogical data. 

The designs on these gravestones are of many types. They 
include the death's head, the angel face with wings, the hourglass, 
and occasionally a sculptured "portrait." The perimeters of these 
stones were frequently decorated with beautifully carved flowers and 
geometric designs. The slate for these stones to a large degree came 
from the "slate pits" of Harvard and Lancaster. 

There were many stonecutters in New England; historian Harriet 
Merrifield Forbes lists over one hundred. Some of those working in 
this area were Foster, Hastings, Lamson, and Park. Only a few of 
them signed their work; when they did, it was on the base of the 
stone, generally below the present grade. 



116 



LINCOLN HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 

Abigail S. Congdon 

Elizabeth C. Donaldson 

Eleanor H. Fitzgerald 

Kenneth E. Hurd 

Jane G. Langton 

Mary G. Spindler 

Thomas C. Wang 

James B. White 

Colin M. Smith, Chairman 

The Historic District Commission approved three projects this 
year. The first was the restoration of a historic property on 
Bedford Road that had been badly damaged by fire. Second was the 
addition of a small barn on Weston Road, and third was the exterior 
lighting of the library addition on Library Lane. This project is 
still incomplete. 

A good deal of the Commission's time was spent on the question of 
where to locate a little league field. The Commission remained 
opposed to locating it in the center of town, but has agreed with the 
Selectman's proposal to permit a temporary field in that location 
until the siting of a permanent field is located at the schools. 
This is part of the renovation plan currently being studied by the 
School Building Committee. 



117 



ROUTE 128 AREA COMMITTEE 

Susan Carr 

Terry Fenton 

Earl Flansburgh 

John Hammond 

David Ries 

Beth Sutherland Rles, Chairman 

In accordance with its charge, the Committee continued to monitor 
real estate development activities in the 128/Waltham area and to 
pursue long-term solutions to the traffic impacts which such 
developments threaten to impose on the Town of Lincoln. For several 
months the Committee heard rumors of the potential sale of the one 
large parcel of land on the Lincoln/Waltham border that had seen no 
activity in the past ten years. In April we were able to verify the 
rumors: a residential developer had an option to purchase the 19.5 
acre tract on Old County Road belonging to the Kennedy brothers. The 
tract, zoned residential, lies primarily in Waltham on the westerly 
side of the road opposite the Polaroid land. 

In the Committee's view, the proposed subdivision of this parcel 
into 26 lots could lead to Old County Road becoming a through 
street. A through road would then attract substantial commuter 
traffic, negatively impacting both the neighborhood and other areas 
of town. This was the same eventuality that we had fought 
strenuously in 1987 and 1988 when Boston Properties sought to 
reconstruct and widen the road. 

The Committee promptly contacted the developer, Eugene Snow, to 
discuss our concerns. We also submitted a lengthy letter to the 
Waltham Board of Planning and Survey outlining these concerns and 
testified at a preliminary hearing on the subdivision plan in June. 

The Committee subsequently entered into a series of meetings with 
Mr. Snow, his attorney, and consulting engineers. We were able to 
persuade Mr. Snow that a through road would not be in his best 
interest, and he agreed to join us in pursuing a closing of Old 
County Road. At the final hearing on the subdivision in October, 
Snow's attorney outlined the proposed road closing to the Waltham 
Planning Board. 

With the help of neighborhood representatives and after a 
well-attended neighborhood meeting, the Committee circulated 
petitions in Lincoln, Waltham and Weston asking the Middlesex County 
Commissioners to approve discontinuing Old County Road for a distance 
of approximately 1,000 feet. We also approached Polaroid to solicit 
their support or non-opposition to our petitions. At year end, 
however, we had not received word of Polaroid's position regarding 
the proposed closing. 



118 



BEMIS HALL ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Barbara Beal 

Debra Haiduven 

Ruth Kramer 

Daniel Spaeth 

Eleanor M. Wilfert, Chairman 

In the spring the Board of Selectmen asked for the Committee's 
input on alcohol, dancing and amplified music in Bemis Hall. 

The Bemis Hall Advisory Committee felt that because the alcohol 
issue is a legal liability and an insurance issue that it should be 
resolved by the Selectmen and Town Counsel. 

Because of the condition of the floor in the Upper Hall, the 
Bemis Hall Advisory Committee agreed that dancing be prohibited 
except with special written permission by the Selectmen. Recently 
the Bemis Hall Advisory Committee learned that this floor will be 
lightly sanded and refinished in the Spring. A new floor will be 
needed in the not too distant future and could cost over $15,000.00. 

The Bemis Hall Advisory Committee agreed to curfews for amplified 
music by users and presented the curfew regulations to the Selectmen 
for approval. 

Several balusters have been replaced on the main staircase, some 
were repaired by Joe Mannarino and more extensive repairs were made 
by Minuteman Regional Vocational Technical School for a small 
charge. The balcony doors will be made safer at a small cost. The 
new light fixtures downstairs and new bulbs upstairs were put in by 
the Boston Edison Encore Program at no cost to the Town. A leak in 
the brick wall near the northwest corner of the building will cost 
about $3,000.00 to repair. Hopefully this will come out of the Town 
maintenance budget for next year. 

The $20,000.00 appropriation voted at the 1986 Annual Town 
Meeting for fiscal year 1987 for work at Bemis Hall is just about 
exhausted. The Bemis Hall Advisory Committee is proud of what has 
been accomplished and much of its success is due to Joe Mannarino f s 
help. 

The Bemis Hall Advisory Committee thanks Alyson Morse Katzman for 
her cooperation over the last several years and wishes her many years 
of happiness ahead in any new endeavor. 



119 



CODMAN COMMUNITY FARMS, INC. 

Mark Banks 

Peter Conrad 

Tom DeNormandie, Vice President 

Dave Donaldson 

Nancy Fleming 

Rainer Frost 

Jon Kelman 

Chris Kilham 

Beth Lerman, Clerk 

Margaret B. Marsh 

Carla Ricci 

Clifton Rice 

Marcia Roehr, Treasurer 

Fan Watkinson 

Suze Craig, President 

Dave Hardy, Farm Manager 
Anne Papadopoulos, Assistant 

In 1992, CCF continued to grow, thanks to a committed, 
hard-working Board and staff. Under the direction of Farm Manager 
Dave Hardy, the Farm yet again strengthened and expanded the 
livestock, hay, and community outreach programs. 

Our livestock now includes: ten minor breed Beef Devons, five 
minor breed Lineback cattle (two born at the Farm); 25 purebred 
Suffolk sheep (eight born at the Farm) and a new, also purebred, 
Suffolk ram, as well as five crossbreeds; three minor breed Tamworth 
sows (two born at the Farm) and a minor breed Tamworth boar; a flock 
of chickens (some raised by Hartwell and Hanscom first graders in 
conjunction with CCF). These animals generate revenues through the 
Farm's sale of naturally raised veal, beef, hamburger, lamb, pork, 
and eggs. 

Although the summer's cool wet weather made good grass, it made 
haymaking itself downright difficult , as the manufacture of good hay 
requires at least three sunny days in a row. In spite of the 
weather, CCF brought in a record crop: over 15,000 bales. 

All during the year CCF provided educational experiences for 
Lincoln residents and beyond. The barn complex hosted a steady 
stream of Farmer's Helpers on Tuesday afternoons for grades 1 through 
3, and has been the focus of a Brooks School elective. We supervised 
hatching of chicken eggs in both Hartwell and Hanscom, planted 
pumpkins with first graders who harvested them as second graders, and 
also planted corn with Hartwell second graders. During the summer, 
not one but two pre-school Children's Gardens, with related 
educational programs, flourished below the regular plotters' 
patches. CCF cattle graced summer pastures on Conant and Page Roads, 
and the Codman House Octagon. 



120 



Buildings and Grounds: We now have a Codman Farm Store, thanks 
to the hard work of a volunteer team of scrapers and painters, who 
organized one bay of Barn C. This project enabled us to sell Farm 
products whenever the Farm is open — 365 days a year, 8 to 4. Compost 
was added this year to our product line, and was sold spring and 
summer, from a carefully maintained stockpile out behind the newly 
constructed chicken coop. A pick-your-own Flower Garden, located at 
the corner of Lincoln and Codman Roads, provided not only revenue but 
also welcome color. 

Fundraisers: CCF took an active part in the Winter Carnival and 
the Fourth of July Celebration, as well as Town Meeting. We also 
hosted a well-attended Sheepshearing and an October Trail Race. 
Continuing a Lincoln tradition, we marked the end of the growing 
season with a town-wide invitation to the Harvest Fair and Barbecue. 
Careful planning and hard work by the membership combined with a 
dawn's eastward sweeping downpour — followed by a lovely sunny day — to 
make this year's celebration one of the most memorable. Many thanks 
to the hundreds of people who volunteered their time, talent, and 
warm support for these events. 

A nonprofit organization, Codman Community Farms relies entirely 
on sale of its agricultural products, supplemented by memberships, 
donations, other gifts, and volunteer service. Independent of the 
Town of Lincoln, CCF receives no formal financial support from the 
Town except for a modest allocation for shared electricity in the 
Barn complex. Fields are leased from the Town and private landowners. 

Because of new projects and programs and more efficient 
equipment, we have been able to increase the agricultural 
productivity of many acres of land in town. We continue our mission: 
to carry on the three hundred year tradition of Lincoln's 
agricultural heritage, to use Lincoln's open lands for productive, 
conscientiously managed farming, and to provide a model of working 
agriculture for the educational, social, and scenic benefit of 
Lincoln and beyond. 



121 



CODMAN COMMUNITY FARMS, INC. 

Statement of Revenues, Expenses and Changes In Fund Balances 

Years Ended November 30, 1992 and 1991 



Operating Revenues: 


1992 


1991 


Sales: 






Hay 


£ 31,060 


i 26,262 


Vegetable crops 


3,921 


1,885 


Livestock 


17,750 


13,274 


Custom work 


4,110 


2,754 


Resale, net of £9,547 related cost 


657 
57,498 


- 


Total Sales 


44,175 


Dues 


13,490 


12,120 


Garden Plot fees 


1,670 


1,650 


Fair 


23,357 


35,674 


Education 


1,897 


1,149 


Interest 


2,037 


1,453 


Rentals 


13,810 


11,885 


Other 


74 


1,034 


Total operating revenues 


113,833 


109,140 


Operating expenses: 






Labor and related costs 


71,410 


53,027 


Seed and livestock 


952 


420 


Fertilizer and lime 


7,187 


8,472 


Repairs 


4,814 


6,703 


Depreciation 


14,412 


14,650 


Feed 


7,035 


5,376 


Fair 


6,422 


12,271 


Rentals 


1,412 


1,222 


Supplies 


1,325 


813 


Water 


1,551 


1,680 


Fuel 


1,666 


3,073 


Insurance, taxes and fees 


1,884 


1,097 


Freight and utilities 


1,953 


1,322 


Legal and accounting 


1,200 


1,200 


Advertising 


132 


1,009 


Bad Debts 


- 


736 


Office supplies and expense 


2,513 


3,960 


Total operating expenses 


125,868 


117,031 



Operating income (loss) 



(12,035) 



( 7,891) 



Non-operating revenue (expenses): 

Unrestricted gifts « 20,910 

Endowments 16,470 

Restricted gift - building 30,000 

Total non-operating revenues (expenses) 67,380 

Excess revenues (expenses) 55,345 



24,660 

19,010 
43,670 
35,779 



Fund Balances at beginning of year 
Fund Balances at end of year 



121,619 
£176,964 



85,840 
£121,619 



122 



CODMAN COMMUNITY FARMS, INC, 

Balance Sheet 

November 30, 1992 and 1991 

Assets 



1992 1991 
Current assets: 

Cash $ 71,544 $ 35,226 

Accounts receivable 4,537 1,661 

Inventory 17,743 19,512 

Prepaid Expenses 3,210 3,131 

Total current assets 97,034 59,530 

Property and equipment, at cost: 

Structures 25,983 23,150 

Motor vehicles and wagons 9,412 9,412 

Farm implements 77,196 74,499 

Livestock 15,125 12,870 

127,716 119,931 

Less accumulated depreciation 58,520 45,973 

Net property and equipment 69,196 73,958 

Other assets- In vested endowment funds contrib. 28,696 12,226 

$194,926 $145,714 

Liabilities and Fund Balances 

Current liabilities: 

Current portion of equipment loans payable $ 5,250 $ 6,508 

Accounts payable 1,512 2,867 

Accrued expenses 1,200 1,230 

Total liabilities 7,962 10,605 

Long-term debt: 

Equipment loans payable - 5,250 

Note payable 10,000 8,240 

Total long-term debt 10,000 13,490 



Fund balances: 






Unrestricted funds 


30,904 


27,746 


Unrestricted funds - House account 


18,168 


7,689 


Restricted funds 


30,000 


- 


Endowment funds 


28,696 


12,226 


.Property and equipment funds 


69,196 


73,958 


Total fund balances 


$ 176,964 


$ 121,619 




$ 194,926 


$ 145,714 



123 



METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL 

William G. Constable, MAPC Representative 

The Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC) is the regional 
planning agency for 101 cities and towns in the Greater Boston 
Metropolitan Area. As such, it provides the Town of Lincoln with 
information and representation about a variety of Issues. In 1992, 
MAPC kicked off a joint services initiative designed to inform meiber 
communities about new and cost effective ways of sharing information 
systems, joint services, cooperative purchasing, and regional 
life-safety dispatch opportunities. 

The MAPC Data Center provides Lincoln and other interested 
users demographic, economic and natural resource information drawn 
from the 1990 U.S. Census Data and several other sources. The Data 
Center provides employment forecasts, analysis of the state budget, 
and has increased both the magnitude and usefulness of data in its 
Geographic Information System (GIS ) programs. 

In 1992, the Commonwealth's transportation planning efforts 
evolved radically, as landmark federal legislation entitled the 
Interstate Surface Transportation Efficiency Act (ISTEA) now provides 
increased local government input into a dramatically more flexible 
federal funding system for highways, transit and transportation 
demand management activities. MAPC not only provided leadership in 
complying with the new law, but also provided the fundamental public 
participation for municipalities into the Transportation Improvement 
Program for federal fiscal years 1993-1995. 

Transportation improvement activities affecting Lincoln were 
reviewed and supported by MAPC, including the opening of the new 
Minuteman Bikeway from Cambridge's Alewife Station to Hanscom Field, 
the Route 2 safety improvements at Bedford Road, and the planning for 
the dramatic reconstruction about to begin at Crosby's Corner. 

MAPC continues to provide staff assistance to the Route 128 
Corridor Planning Study and to municipal review of Massport 
activities at the Hanscom Air Force Base. 

Lincoln's representitive has, once again, been voted a member 
of the executive committee representing the towns within the MAPC 
region. This year he has placed particular emphasis on matters 
relating to land use planning, transportation, and municipal 
financial assistance. 



124 



LINCOLN PERSONNEL BOARD 

Kathy Nicholson 

Beth Ries 

Scott Lathrop, Chairman 

In 1992, long-time member Sam Donnell resigned from the Personnel 
Board. While sorry to see him go, the Board wishes him well in his 
adventures . 

Later in the year, the Board welcomed new members, Kathy 
Nicholson and Beth Ries. The Board looks forward to tapping their 
expertise. 

Otherwise, it was another quiet year for the Personnel Board. 
With the non-union personnel system in place, maintenance of the 
system has become routine. The Board remains pleased with the 
consistency afforded by the system which is demonstrated each time 
questions regarding classification are brought to its attention. 

Next year, the Board will continue to maintain the personnel 
system, as well as address any other issues that may arise. 



125 



Library, Rereation and Schools 



TRUSTEES OF THE LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY 







Term 


Expires 


Bruce Bare 


Selectmen's Appointee 




1993 


Craig Hill 


Self-Perpetuating 






Barbara Low 


Elected, retired 1992 




1992 


Linda May 


Elected 




1995 


Mary Newman 


Self-Perpetuating 






Nancy Rote 


School Committee Appointee 


1994 


Doug Harding, Chairman Self- Perpetuating 






OVERVIEW 









1992, like 1991, was a year of adjustment to the Town's tightly 
constrained financial resources. However, with generous help from 
private but public-spirited citizens, the library increased its 
service to the Town, with materials circulation up 7.5% over 1991 and 
program attendance up 5.5%. The year was also important in that the 
trustees embarked on a major planning review of the library's role 
and allocation of funds to service these roles. Progress was also 
made on developing a long-term site plan including access, landscape, 
lighting, and exterior functional areas. 

Always of note in an Annual Town Report is the fact that the 
library "float" continues to win blue ribbons at the annual July 4th 
parade - a sure sign of ongoing Town support! 

RESPONSIVENESS 

Continued adjustment to the Town's financial realities resulted 
in a futher reduction in the materials budget and slightly less staff 
coverage. The very gratifying support of over 300 citizens who 
contributed more than $15,000 made it possible to minimize the 
negative impact of the budgetary cuts on our collection. 

The trustees spent much of the year working through a 
substantive planning process with Kathy Glick-Weil, the Heal 
Librarian. The results of a survey of patrons conducted in February 
and the input from the March Town Meeting were combined in the 
discussions. The review focused on four functions: popular 
materials, independent learning center, formal education support 
(research) center, and community activities center. We concluded 
that our financial allocation of funds coincided with existing uses 
and that on a service level we generally functioned at a medium-sized' 
library status rather than as a small town library. 



126 



One outgrowth of this activity for the trustees has been to 
develop a mission statement. While nothing has been officially 
adopted at the time this report was written, we will include these 
concepts and ideas in the final statement. The primary mission of 
the Lincoln Library is to provide and maintain a collection of books 
and other published materials, in all their many physical forms and 
categories of subject matter, giving Townspeople ready access to the 
broadest possible range of the present and past writings that they 
may need or want for both instruction and amusement, for general 
reference, and for informing themselves on the intellectual, 
cultural, political, and societal concerns and ideas of the day and 
of the past. In general, the emphasis of the collection is on 
breadth rather than specialization. We are not a library for 
scholarly research, with the one exception of the subject of Town 
history, for which we will continue to be a repository of primary 
source materials. One vital part of our mission, in no way 
secondary, is to help introduce our children to the magic of reading 
and to its great value as a source from which they may draw lifelong 
pleasures, intellectual stimulation, emotional and spiritual growth, 
knowledge of the larger world, and, ideally, the eventual ability to 
participate in the commerce of ideas that they will need as 
thoughtful citizens of a complex society. 

We also made two specific service changes during the year. The 
most significant was a change in hours effective in early September. 
We reduced hours on Friday afternoons and reopened the library on 
Monday afternoon and evening in an attempt to improve access and 
honor the requests made at Town Meeting. The second was to introduce 
on-line catalogue inquiry to the Minuteman Library Network from home 
computers having modems. During the first month of operation, 150 
callers made over 350 inquiries. 

PROPERTY, PLANT & EQUIPMENT 

This business report term also appropriately defined one 
dimension of our efforts this year. Again, planning was central. 
With both expertise and funds from the Planning Board, the trustees 
worked with landscape architect Ron Wood and the Historic District 
Commission to develop a preliminary site plan for the library 
addressing issues of access, lighting, landscape materials, and 
external functional areas. By late January 1993 the first fruits of 
that effort will be evident from the additional lighting of the area, 
done in consultation with Lam Partners, Inc. The safety concerns of 
patrons, staff, and trustees should be greatly ameliorated. 

On the inside, further progress was made toward completing the 
furnishings of the new library. This year monies from the Carman 

[Fund provided for the new chairs, tables, and a light in the 
downstairs turret, the choice of which was coordinated by Jane 

1 Telling. Scoping out new books, chatting with a friend, or waiting 
for a ride should now be more comfortable and relaxing. 



127 



PROGRAMS 

A significant segment of any library's role as a community 
activity center involves programs. Attendance rose 5.5% above 1991, 
with over 7,000 adults and children coming to more than 300 events. 
The Wednesday morning series and the jazz programs remained as strong 
anchors. The wide spectrum of exhibits in the main floor gallery and 
the DeNormandie Room continue to attract viewers and to provide 
artists from Lincoln and surrounding communities with places to 
display their work. Have you been seen yet? 

One new program was specifically initiated by the trustees this 
year: Boxing Day at the Library. It will be held annually on 
December 26 (mark your calendar right now) as a specific time for 
residents, visitors, returning students, etc., to congregate in a 
community place and exchange greetings, stories, and good wishes 
during the holiday season. Don't miss the second annual Boxing Day 
reception this year! 

FRIENDS 

The "Friends of the Lincoln Library" continue to be important 
both as friends to the library and benefactors to the Town. In 
addition to their yearly support through underwriting museums passes 
and special children's programs, they have already upgraded the copy 
machine and plan to donate a computer so that the library staff may 
better serve us all. Their fund raising efforts on our behalf are 
both creative and recreative, as befit such literate types: January 
1993 offered "Murder by the Book"; May will be merry with a trip to 
Old England, home of literary giants and garden fairylands; and in 
September the roman a clef will be transformed into the key to 
interesting residences as the Friends host a House Tour. Inquiring 
minds can get further details from the Friends. Their main sources 
of income continue to be membership dues and the profits from the 
monthly book sales. Therefore, join now and buy a bargain every 
second Saturday morning of the month at Bemis Hall. 

TRUSTEES 



The trustees experienced change again this year. Barbara Low, 
who served as our elected trustee for six years, was always ready to 
meet a challenge. To do this she was willing to master small 
details, help craft a compromise, served on the Personnel 
Subcommittee with distinction, and always was a mainstay in her 
support toward the creation of the July 4th float. Her expertise 
will be missed. Fortunately for us, Barbara's successor, Linda May, 
also brings with her an abundance of talent. 

STAFF 



The trustees wish to thank the staff on behalf of the Town for 
another year of excellent and creative service during difficult 
times. It is clear to the trustees that the staff, a wonderfully 



128 



disparate and talented group, challenge, support and blend with one 

another in order to maintain the quality of library services for 

which Lincoln is so well known. The spirit, enthusiasm, and 

commitment of this "group of 15" is often augmented by spouses, who 
offer both indirect and direct support, such as our newly donated 

public access computer. All together, they make it possible for the 
Lincoln Library to be a giant in its class. 

GIFTS 

The trustees gratefully acknowledge the many contributions made 
to the library during this year. Bequests, memorial gifts, and 
annual contributions have long played a significant role in 
maintaining the strength of our programs and the furnishings of our 
building. For the past two years, we have had a special appeal to 
augment our book fund monies, which were the specific targets of cuts 
due to reduced Town funding. It is our hope that FY94 will see a 
resurgence of the public funding of our library needs, and that this 
restoration of support may be directed toward adding to the base 
rather than just maintaining it. 



WEDNESDAY MORNING AT THE LIBRARY 1992 



January 8 
February 12 
March 11 
April 8 
October 14 
November 18 



'Full Circle" Jennifer Burckett-Picker 
'Art Therapy at the Peace Barn" Mary Brogna 
'...A Pungency of Herbs" Eliana DeNormandie 
'A New Kid on the Block" John Kerr 
'Vision Statement" Rebecca van der Bogert 
'Therapeutic Massage" Gladys Hillman 



Exhibits in the Gallery 199 2 

January Lynn Gargill 

February Andrea Harrington 

March Ruth Barbarow 

April Carroll School Artists 

May Lincoln and Hanscom Schools 

June Rachel Pax ton 

July Kathleen McDonough 

August Huckleberry Arts 

September Keith Johnson 

October Lincoln Arts Council 

November Ruta Smilskalns 

December Dilla Tingley 

Exhibits in the DeNormandie Room 1992 

January Michael Rumrill 

February Ron Wood 

March Dean Hanson 

April Anne Walker 



129 



May 


Pamela Perry 


June 


Eli Brookner 


July 


Dorothy Shearman 


August 


Laurie White 


September 


Laura Heijn 


October 


Lincoln Arts Council 


December 


Deborah Page 


STAFF 1991 





Kathy Glick-Weil 
Ellen Sisco 
Lisa Acker Rothenberg 
Amy Gavalis 
Jane Flanders 
Virginia Chang 
Sheila Williams 
Carolyn Birmingham 
Kathy Rushby 
Kathie Brobeck 
Ann Cheney 
Dana Weigent 
John Bottino 
Robert Bottino 
Ruth Dietmeier 



Librarian 

Assistant Librarian 

Technical Services Librarian 

Children's Librarian 

Children's Librarian 

Reference Librarian 

Assistant Children's Librarian 

Senior Library Technician 

Bookkeeper 

Circulation Assistant 

Circulation Assistant 

Children's Circulation Assistant 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Page 



HOURS 1992 
(Jan. - Aug. ) 
Tuesday, Friday 
Wednesday, Thursday 
Saturday 



9:00 am to 6:00 pm 

9:00 am to 8:30 pm 

10:00 am to 5:00 pm 



(Sept. - Dec. ) 

Monday 

Tuesday, Thursday 

Wednesday 

Friday 

Saturday 



1:00 pm to 8:30 pm 
9:00 am to 6:00 pm 
9:00 am to 8:30 pm 
9:00 am to 2:00 pm 
10:00 am to 5:00 pm 



Closed Saturdays, July through Labor Day 
Closed Sundays 



LIBRARY VOLUNTEERS 1992 



Patty Arena 
Marsha Bibring 
Martha DeNormandie 
B. Grim 

Charles Hersch 
Linda Holland 



Jane Langton 
Margaret Marsh 
Bill Poisson 
Elizabeth Snelling 
Susan Sugar 
Jane Telling 
Ed Williams 



130 



And Special Thanks to: 

Jane Telling and The Friends of the Lincoln Library 

All of the people who gave of their time for the outstanding programs 

the Library and the Town enjoyed all year long. 

The Library is grateful to those who gave books, CDs, tapes, and 
other items to support the collection during the year. They include: 



Azrack Family 

Banks Family 

Tracey Barron 

Carolyn Birmingham 

Susan Brooks 

Francesca Brown 

Susan Collins 

Thoraas Cone 

Cottage Press 

Peter Cutler 

Stuart Denholm 

Digital Equipement Corp, 

David Donald 

Sam Donnell 

Barbara Dunn 

Nancy Ellis 

Jim Faran 

Ellin Fuller 

Margot Green 

Annette Griggs 

B. Grim 

Mary Ann Hales 

Lisa Hamilton 

Ruth and Norman Hapgood 

Susan Harding 

Alynn Harvey 

Heckscher Family 

Charles Hersch 

Sarah Holden 

Hopkins Family 

Hubbard Family 

Huckleberry Artists 

Bruce Hunter 



Kahn Family 

Ellie King 

Ann Lesser 

Lincoln Land Conservation 

Trust 
Cynthia Lo 

Kate DeNormandie McCarey 
Jim McConchie 
Thor Maillet 
Deb Manegold 
Margaret Martin 
Joseph Masters 
May Family 
Henry Morgan 
Lennie Moss 
Marjorie Murphy 
Michael Palmiotto 
Roger Payne 
Ann Rote 
Henry Rugo 
Rudnicks 
Ann Satterfield 
Schmid Family 
Shapiro Family 
Ellen Sisco 
Cort St rat ton 
Joe Sussman 
Bella Wheeler 
Ed Williams 
Sheila Williams 
Walter Wood 
Mandy Young 



Magazine Gift Subscriptions were received from the following people: 



John Boyer 
Leslie Cowperthwaite 
Kits Culver 
Ruth Hapgood 
Robert Hicks 
Lockwood Famiily 
Ludwig Luft 
Alice McKennan 



People of Matadepera 

Ruth Ragan 

Roy Raja 

Kathy Rushby 

William Ryan 

Marina and Wilfried Schmid 

Sierra Club 

Irving Telling 



131 



Margaret Marsh Bella Wheeler 

Brad Meyer Sheila Williams 

Merv Moore Larry Zuelke 

Lennie Moss 

STATISTICS 199 2 

General ; 

Number of days open 258 
Fines Collected $4, 124.64 

Acquisitions : 

Books 

Inventory 1991 71,325 

Purchases 3,595 

Gifts 27 

Total Inventory 74,947 

Discarded or Lost -1,908 

Inventory 1992 73,039 

Books on Tape 

Inventory 1991 250 

Purchases 17 

Gifts 1 

Total Inventory 268 

Discardei or Lost -2 

Inventory 1992 266 

Records, Tapes, CD's, and A-V 

Inventory 1991 4,239 

Purchases 357 

Gifts 5 

Total Inventory 4,601 

Discarded or Lost -396 

Inventory 1992 * 4,205 

Circulation: 

Total Circulation 1991 114,096 

Adult Circulation 1992 63,273 

Juvenile Circulation 1992 59,368 

Total Circulation 1992 122,641 

Programs : 

Adult Programs 73 

Children's Programs 193 

Non-Library Groups 62 

Total Programs 328 



132 



Attendance 
Adult 
Children 

Non-Library Groups 
Total Attendance 

CONTRIBUTIONS 1992 



2,098 
4,216 
1,007 
7,321 



Mr. & Mrs. John Abbott 

Mr. & Mrs. Walter Abbott 

Diana Abrashkin 

Robert & Alison Adkins 

Judith Ahern-Wiercinski 

Judith & Rand Alexander 

Emily & Alexander Althausen 

Mr. & Mrs. J. B. Ames 

Carl Anderson 

Elaine & David Anderson 

Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence 
Anderson 

Mr. & Mrs. Francis Andrews 

Mr. & Mrs. Craig Angell 

Anonymous 

Jamie & John Atkins 

Patricia Bagley 

Mr. & Mrs. Balogh 

Jamie Banks 

Marie Baratta 

Bruce Bare 

Carolyn & Joel Bargmann 

Benjamin Barnes 

Barron Family 

Becky & Bill Bartovics 

Baybank Middlesex 

Beacon Communications 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Beal 

Thomas Beatty 

Carol Backer & Ben Wells 

Mart a Bennett 

Ann Benson 

Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth Bergen 

Susan & Roger Bergen 

Ann & Norman Bikalis 

Mr. & Mrs. Bockoven 

Roger Bond 

Nancy & Joseph Bower 

Margaret & John Boyer 

Nancy & John Braasch 
, Ylizabeth Bradshaw & 
Peter Conrad 

Esther Braun 
* Norman Brisson 



Myra Brodney 

Susan and Paul Brooks 

Lorian Brown & Jos. Urner 

Denis e Browne 

Barbara Buchan 

Mrs. Robert Burnham 

William. & Mary Butler 

Jane & Shel Buzney 

Mary Cabot 

Bruce Campbell 

Bradford & Ellen Cannon 

Charles Carl, Jr. 

Mrs. John Carman 

Jaime Caro 

Charles & Virginia Casale 

Anna Caskey 

Carol & John Caswell 

Marcia & Jan Chaiken 

Catherine Chan 

Sally Chandler 

Irving Chase 

Chung- Yao Chao 

Elizabeth & Jerry Cherniak 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Chin 

Chiotelis Family 

Deborah Choate 

Chauncy & Margaret Chu 

Tomoko & Nelson Chu 

Maria & Rich Churchill 

Mary Ciampi 

Marcia & Frederick 

Ciaramaglia 
Kathryn Corbia & 

Jeffrey Brown 
Susan & Donald Collins 
Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Cone 
Abigail Congdon & Joseph Azrack 
Mr. & Mrs. John Cook 
Paul Cook 
Jeanne Cousins 
Cowboy Marketing 
Pat & Stephen Crandall 
Kate Culver 



133 



Claire & Rob't. Cunningham 

A. Dallos 

Janet Daniels 

Barbara & Leo Darling 

Eugene Darlin3 

Mr. & Mrs. Morton Darman 

Mr.u Mrs. Chester d'Autremont 

Anita Davis 

Rosamond & Francois Delori 

Mrs. E. J. Denehy 

Eliana & Robt DeNormandie 

Martha DeNormandie 

Gwen & Archer desCognets 

Barbara Dexter 

Richard Dickey 

Kim & Robert Dieball 

Digital Equip. Corp. 

Phyllis & William Doherty 

Julie Dobrow & Larry Vale 

Astrid Donaldson 

Lynn & David Donaldson 

Malcolm & Eleanor Donaldson 

M. C. Donaldson 

Doris & Grace Downing 

Mrs. Leonard Dowse 

Mr.& Mrs. N. Drago 

Shirley Drew 

Marjorie Durand & 

Greg Stathis 
Jeff Eaton 
Martha Edes 

Mr. & Mrs. Howard Elkus 
Nan Ellis 

Judith Emmons & Brent Bullock 
Sarah & Frederic Eppling 
Laura & Allan Eschenroeder 
Fairhaven Farms 
Andrew Falender 
Palmer Fa ran 
Gabe Farrell 
James & Nancy Fleming 
Henry Flint 
Mary & David Ford 
Rahnhild Fredriksen 
Florence & Charles Freed 
E. Friedman & J. Cohen 
Sophie Freud 

Katherine & Enrico Funaro 
Mr.& Mrs. Paul Gardant 
Robert & Kathleen Garner 
Barbara Garrison 
Marylou & Greg Gauvin 



Molly Gayley 

Jerry & Anne Gechter 

Erica & William Gienapp 

Mary Glanz 

Wanda & Michael Goldbaum 

Reid Goodman 

Leslie Gray 

David Green 

Myrna Green & Jerry Heidt 

Pamela & Jerry Green 

Noreen Greethara 

Bill & B. Grim 

Stuart Grover 

Josephine Gump 

Glenn Gustavson 

Susan & Doug Harding 

Henry & Jessica Harolan 

Evelyn & Roger Harris 

Phyllis Hatfield 

Geo. & Daphne Hatsopoulos 

Sherry Haydock & 

Mason Freeman 
Jeanne Healey 
Jane & Frank Heart 
Mr.& Mrs. Stan Heck 
Ann & Thomas Heller 
Ruth Ann & Robert 

Hendrickson 
Phyllis & Charles Hersch 
Evelyn Her the 1 
Mr.& Mrs. Leon Hester 
Heather & Craig Hill 
Gloria & Joseph 

Hingston 
Walter Hollister 
Lois Jean Holmes & 

Victor Lachica 
Dr. & Mrs. Robert Hopkins 
Jean & Benjamine Horn 
Margaret & Eliot Hubbard 
Hunt Foundation 
Christopher Hurd 
Susan & Sven Ingard 
Polly Jackson 
Ann Jacobs 

Madeline & Ernest Jacquet 
Wendy Jamie son 
Ronnie & Stephen Kanarek 
Holly & John Kania 
John Kerr 

Bernice & Jack Kerrebrock 
Joan & Bert Kessel 



134 



Janet Keyes 
Elizabeth King 
Carolyn Kinney & 

Will Echardt 
Susan Klem 
Mary & Walter Klem 
Naj Nan Ko 
Dafna Krouk-Gordon 
Larry Kroin 

Mini Landis & Greg Harney 
Mr.& Mrs. Richard Lang 
John Langell 
Inez Laurence 
Thomas Leggat 

Elizabeth & Leonard Lerman 
Betty Levin 

Cynthia & Hugo Leipmann 
Nancy & Lao Tzu Li 
Lincoln Family 
Michaela & Steve Lipsey 
C.P. & Lucy Lo 
Cathy & Bruce Long 
Gwyn & Rob Loud 
Barbara & Stephen Low 
Susan & John Ludden 
Anne & Ludwig Luft 
Harriet Lutnicki 
William Lytle 

Mr.& Mrs. Stephen McCarthy 
Mr. & Mrs. William McCune 
Anna & John McGovern 
Robert Machaver 
Kathy & Jim McHugh 
Janis McKenney 
Alex MacLean 
Mary McNabb 
Barbara McNally 
Robert Mack 
Susan Macrae & 

Eric Broadbent 
Deb Mane gold & Win Quale 
James & Sarah Mansfield 
Barbara Marcks 

Gary Marple & Meredith Rutter 
Mary & Peter Mars den 
Margaret & Robert Martin 
Max Mason 
June Matthews 
Linda & James May 
Gale & Glover Mayfield 
Melissa & Brad Meyer 
Edith & Sumner Milender 



Carol & Norbett Mintz 

Florence & M. Montgomery 

Mr. & Mrs. Edgar Moor 

Mrs. Robert Moore 

Merna & Gerald Morse 

Meredyth & John Moses 

Frances & Leonard Moss 

Karen Moss 

Silke & Sidney Moss 

Jane & Robert Mueller 

Ruth Murphy 

Sam Mygatt 

Ramesh Naravan 

Jean & Ed Nardi 

Nancy Nardone 

Dorothy Nelson 

Katherine & Richard Nenneman 

Mary Newman 

Suzanne Newton 

Mr. & Mrs. Albert Nickerson 

Katherine O'Brien 

Judith Ogden 

Barbara & David O'Neil 

Marilyn & Paul O'Rourke 

Kathryn & Leo Palmer 

Rita & Sal Panetta 

Paramount Communications 

Mr. & Mrs. Jackson Parker 

Mr.& Mrs. H. Morse Payne 

William & Mary Payne 

Elizabeth Peavy 

Joan & Guido Perera 

Samuel Perlman 

Terry & Steven Perlmuttter 

Sarah & John Perry 

Elizabeth & Robert Phelps 

Mrs. H. B. Phillips 

Dennis & Jennifer Picker 

Martha Pickett 

Alice & Anthony Pickman 

Bette & Geoff Piece 

Polly Pike 

Diana & Martin Powers 

Peggy & Richard Puffer 

Ellen & Roy Raja 

Ruth Ragan 

Gene Rapperport 

Nancy Raws on 

Jackie & Charles Resnick 

Penny Restuccia 

Nathalie & John Rice 



135 



Ingeraarie & Frederick 

Richardson 
Martin Risch 
The Rissers 

Jerome Ritz & Sara Mattes 
John Robinson 
Scott Robinson & 

Jeanette Kazanjian 
Marcia Roehr 
Evelyn Rogers 
Louise Rogers 
Robert Ross 

Selina & Allen Rossiter 
Nancy Rote 
Jane & Ron Row 
Faith & Henry Rugo 
Maggie Russell 
William & Helen Ryan 
Luciana Sacerdote 
St. Joseph's Church 
Marjorie & Walt Salmon 
Mrs. Ward Sands 
Anne & Charles Satterfield 
Betty- Jane & Benson Scheff 
Ger truce & William Scheft 
Harry Scheuer 

Patricia & Robert Schneider 
Linelle & Robert Schudy 
Beth & Ned Schuller 
Ellen & Judah Schwartz 
Esther & David Shapiro 
Steve Shapse 
Mary Sheldon 

Laurie Silva & Mark Tinker 
Sara Silverstein & 

Duclan Murphy 
Karen Sinclair 
Mary Smallman 
Beverly Smith 
Diana & Colin Smith 
Elizabeth Snelling 
Sophia & John Spiliakos 
Barbara & Robert Stecher 
Kitty Stein 
Phillip Stevenson 
Helena & Roger Stoddard 
Henri-Ann & Joseph Sussman 
Robert Sutherland 
Linda Svetz 
Doug Swain 

Mr. & Mrs. William Swift 
Julia Taylor 



W. Royce & Dorothy Taylor 

Jane & Irving Telling 

Mary & John Terrell 

Dorothy & Lawrence Thompson 

Lester Thurow 

Jane Tierney 

Gloria & Glenn Tinder 

Jane Tod 

Harriet Todd 

Margie Topf & Stuart Rose 

Transfer Service Inc. 

Mr. & Mrs. Trippe 

Raymond Tunnell 

James Turner 

Wat Tyler 

Diane Umbro 

Evelyn Vallon 

Ruth Wale 8 

Ruth Walkey 

Patricia Walsh 

Charlton & Rosly Walter 

Mr.ci Mrs. Duncan Warren 

Joey & Joel Wechsler 

Dana Weigent & Toby Hayes 

Debra & Nathaniel Welch 

Mr. & Mrs. Vernon Westcott 

Gina & Jack White 

Mr. & Mrs. John White 

Mrs. Robert White 

Ross Whitman 

Agnes & Rick Wiggin 

Robin Wilkerson & 

Steve Atlas 
Blandyna Williams & 

Stephen Brand 
Mr.& Mrs. Werner Willmann 
Delsa Winer 
Joyce Winship 
Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Winship 
Mary Winston 
George Wood 
Orrin Wood 

Greta & Andrew Wright 
Joan & Joseph Yamron 
Ann Yos 
Sandra Young & 

Arthur Miller 

»• etc. Thank you one and all 



136 



BE Cordova and dana museum and park 

l Board of Trustees 



Ruth S cheer, President 
Robert Frank, 1st Vice President 
Laurie Dewey, 2nd Vice President 
John R. White, Treasurer 
Francis S. Moult on, Jr., Clerk 

Joseph Bower 
Robert Brannen 
Jonathan Cohen 
Susan Fargo 
James Foster 
John French 
Arthur Goldberg 
Gregory Harney 
Ronnie Kanarek 
Gus Kayafas 
Joyce Linde 
Melissa Meyer 
Geoffrey Nunes 
David Ogden 
Barbara Sisson 
Margaret Wengren 

PRESIDENT'S REPORT, December 30, 1992 

Ruth Scheer, President, Board of Trustees 

These are exciting times at DeCordova. After years of 
discussing the future direction of the Museum, we are now initiating 
the objectives outlined in our Long Range Plan. In 1992, the 
DeCordova Board of Trustees took important steps towards modernizing 
our campus facilities and preparing the Museum for the demands of the 
next century. 

Led by Co-Chairs Jonathan Cohen and Robert Brannen, a special 
sub-committee conducted a nine-month search before selecting 
Kallmann, McKinnell & Wood. This architectural firm will develop a 
Master Plan to establish priorities for renovation and expansion. 

Gerhard Kallmann and Michael McKinnell founded Kallraan, 
McKinnell & Wood after they won a national competition to design 
Boston's new City Hall in 1962. The firm enjoys an outstanding 
international reputation for design and technical excellence, and 
recently completed projects for the Peabody Museum, the Minnesota 
Museum of Art and Yale University's art facilities. Boston Globe 
architecture critic, Robert Campbell, calls the firm "the best 
architects in Boston." 



137 



uur aging pnysicai plant requires immediate attentions Julian 
deCordova's 80 year old residence now houses the Museum's main 
galleries and remains fundamentally unchanged since its 
transformation into an arts facility in the late 1940' s. DeCordova's 
newest buildings, the Museum School studios, were built in the early 
1960*8. 

The new Master Plan will provide a systematic approach to 
upgrade both facilities, so DeCordova can continue to comply with the 
standards mandated by the American Association of Museums. During 
this planning stage, the design team will examine a host of specific 
issues, such as climate control, security, requirements for art 
conservation and compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act. 

The Board and its fundraising counsel, The Wayland Group, are 
working closely to secure the financial resources we will need to 
coaplete our construction and renovation program. At the same time, 
the Board has appointed a steering committee to coordinate special 
planning for the Capital Campaign. Executive Committee members 
Marnie Wengren and Treasurer Jack White will serve as co-chairs. 

A long process awaits us. Yet, we are invigorated by this 
opportunity to build an enduring legacy, a guarantee that this 
remarkable institution of regional and national contemporary art will 
excite, inspire and educate its New England audiences for years to 
come. 



138 



■ director's report 

Paul Master-Karnik, PhD, Director 

I recently took a small group of the Museum's Trustees and 
Overseers up to the roof of DeCordova's main building. As we 
gingerly negotiated four flights of stairs through an ill-lit back 
stairwell, a few reservations crossed my mind about the sensibility 
of this outing. Those doubts were quickly erased by the magnificent 
view that greeted us. 

What a sight — and what a site! From this vantage point, a 
viewer could have looked over the expanse of Flint's Pond to the 
rising New Hampshire mountains on one side and turned to see the 
Boston skyline on the other. DeCordova's diversity - its Sculpture 
Park, its Museum School Studios, the Education Building and the 
Amphitheater - clearly lay all around us. 

In the twilight, we could still see visitors to our campus. 
Some had completed a tour of our museum galleries and were wandering 
among our outdoor sculptures. Others were entering studios to 
sharpen their artistic skills or to learn new ones. These were 
people of different backgrounds and talents who shared a common view 
that DeCordova plays an important role in their lives. 

Why? Certainly, not by accident. DeCordova's educational 
mission focuses on the creation of art - the people and the process. 
Contemporary art allows us to further emphasize this humanist 
approach by introducing the living artist/maker to our audiences 
through classes, lectures, and informal gatherings. In the pages 
ahead, you will read how our programming touches the lives of those 
around us. 

With financial support for the arts shrinking nationwide, many 
of my collegues may wonder if they are also stumbling through a dark 
staircase, uncertain of the final destination. When I stood on the 
roof, gazing down on our beautiful campus, my own concerns for 
tomorrow could not overshadow what I clearly saw that evening - 
DeCordova's strength and potential. With sound fiscal management, 
innovative programming, and the start of our largest capital campaign 
ever, DeCordova will continue to grow as a viable, contemporary arts 
resource for all of New England. 



139 



DE CORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 

Museum Staff 

Paul Master-Karnik, Ph.D., Director 
Joan Kennedy, Assistant to the Director 

Adninlstratlon 

Franco Riello, Accountant 

Susan Atwater, Administrative Assistant 

Michael Sockol, Public Relations Director 

George Vasquez , Photographer 

Anna Holland, Design Assistant 

Barbara Barry, Special Events Coordinator 

Cathy Burns, Maureen Connolly, 

and Sylvia Passley-Harris, Function Managers 
Barbara Stecher, Research Assistant 
Linda Anderson-Snow, Lise Dalton, Jeannette Greenstene, 

Receptionists 
June Ekstrom, Weekend Manager 

Curatorial 



Rachel Rosenfield Lafo, Senior Curator 
Nick Capasso, Assistant Curator 
Lynn Herrmann Traub, Registrar 
Bradford Gonyer, Preparator 

Education 

Eleanor Lazarus, Associate Director, Education 

Linda Foster, School Manager 

Carole Somol, Outreach Coordinator 

Jill Brown, Docent Instructor/ Coordinator 

Gail Stevens, Administrative Assistant 

Amy Terrell, School Store Manager 

Jeff Casto, Phyllis Fish, Gillian Titus, School Store Clerks 

Development 

Denise Trapani, Associate Director, Development 

Kathleen Callahan, Assistant Director, Development 

Ariana Fisher, Development Assistant 

Susan Diachisin, Membership Director 

Deborah Avant , Membership and PR Assistant 

Toni Cantlin, Membership Coordinator 

Jane Kennedy, Volunteer Coordinator 

Corporate Program 

Sandra Mongeon, Corporate Program Director 

Administrative Assistant 

Security Buildings and Grounds 

Ed Chisholm Robert Little, Manager 

Robert Bearchell, Assistant Manager 
Douglas Holstan, Grounds Assistant 



140 



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1A2 



THE LINCOLN CULTURAL COUNCIL 

Barbara Garrison 

Wale ska James 

Lanna Keller 

Robert Loud 

Lucy Sprayregen, Treasurer 

Sidney Walker, Secretary 

Sandra Grind lay, Co -Chairman 

Stephanie Rolfe, Co-Chairman 



THE ARTS LOTTERY FUNDS ALLOCATED TO LINCOLN 

At the request of the Massachusetts Cultural Council (MCC), the 
Lincoln Arts Council changed its title to THE LINCOLN CULTURAL 
COUNCIL. Funds allocated by the MCC annually may now be awarded to 
benefit the arts, humanities and interpretive sciences. 

The principal objectives of the MCC are (1) to promote and 
maintain the vitality of existing cultural resources, (2) to insure 
the continued contribution and value of these resources to the 
Commonwealth, the local communities and their residents, and (3) to 
involve as many citizens as possible in some aspect of cultural 
activity. The Lincoln Cultural Council (LCC) has adopted a policy of 
awarding grants from State funds to applications that directly benefit 
the community of Lincoln. 

For the Spring 1992 funding cycle of the MCC, Lincoln received 
$1,000 in Arts Lottery funding. In addition there was a holdover of 
$789 from previous cycles, making $1,789 available. 

For Spring 1992 the following Arts Lottery applications were 
approved: 

Words Move, "An Evening with Dylan Thomas" $ 300 
Wanda Paik, Piano Recital at DeCordova 

Museum for Lincoln residents 290 

DeCordova Museum & Park, Art in the Park 150 

Friends of the Lincoln Library, Jazz Concert 100 
Brooks School PASS tickets to enable 

students to attend theaters (2 grants) 775 

Total Arts Lottery Funds Approved $1,615 

Remaining Balance - to be carried forward 174 

During the Summer of 1992, MCC indicated that there now would 
only be one grant cycle per year. Applications are to be submitted to 
the LCC by October 15. The State will not consider and fund those 
recommended until some time in March the following year. We now await 
'funding for those applications we approved in Lincoln last October. 
The good news was that our 1993 allocation would increase to $2,000. 



143 



LINCOLN CULTURAL COUNCIL'S LOCAL FUNDS 

The LCC initiates fundraising events, and receives I 
contributions which may be used to support the arts in any way that 
the Council deems appropriate. 

During 1992 the LCC supported the following activities from its 
own funds: 

After-School Instrumental Music Program - 

2 concerts at Brooks School for all students $ 300 
Art Show at Library, featuring Lincoln Artists 

& Reception with guest speaker 393 

Video Workshop for Teens. Instructor & equipment 573 

Additional theater tickets for Brooks School 115 

WordsMove. "Under Milkwood" by Dylan Thomas 200 

DeCordova Museum, Art in Park (committed for 1993) 200 

Drumlin Farm Food Project's Arts component (1993) 350 

Total Program Costs from Local Funds $2,131 

The LCC pursues a policy of working to provide a revolving fund 
for the arts in Lincoln. The Council plans a major fundraising event 
for the Spring of 1993. It also has received donations and admission 
from events with which it has been associated. There was a tuition 
charge for the Video Workshop. 

The Council plans to hold an annual meeting to bring together 
all those persons in the Town who are interested in the Arts, 
Humanities or Interpretive Sciences to explore ways in which we can 
collaborate, support one another, and learn of cultural needs inf 
Lincoln. The Library has been asked to set up a town calendar for use 
by these individuals and organizations, so that we may gain an 
overview of the events planned and scheduled. This should help to 
prevent conflicts in scheduling and to suggest areas where new 
programs would be welcome. Mary Ann Hales, of the Cottage Press, has 
kindly consented to our use of her Lincoln Calendar for this purpose. 



144 



I RECREATION COMMITTEE 

Kathleen Coleman 

Anne Crosby 

Donna Johnson 

Janet Maloney 

Rick Wiggin 

John Adams, Chairman 

Debra Haiduven, Director 

Under the leadership of Debra Haiduven, the Recreation 
Department had an excellent year. The year was a very successful one 
for our major recreation programs. We had a very fine year at the 
pool. We sold 229 resident memberships, 188 were family, 32 were 
single, and 9 were senior. We also sold 25 out-of-town memberships 
of which 24 were family and one was single. We were fortunate in 
having an exceptional staff headed by Mike Feldstein. He was 
supported by two returning staff members, Susan Harding and Charlotte 
Green, and four new staff members, Julie Buxton, Laurie Boyce, 
Kris ten Clarke and John Stam. For the first time, we sold snacks and 
beverages at the pool. This was a significant source of revenue and 
was managed by Debra Haiduven. While there were no major maintenance 
problems, it is clear that the pool generated $47,583 which was 
slightly over the budgeted revenue of $45,000. 

The Lincoln Day Camp had another record year with 460 campers 
attending the three sessions. As usual, the last session was the 
least popular with 144 attending, up from 122 last year. The first 
session attracted 151, up from 147 last year; and the second session 
attracted 163, up from 150 last year. The camp generated $101,061 in 
revenue, significantly more than the $81,750 we had budgeted. There 
were 29 counselors under Camp Director Susan Callum and two Junior 
Counselors. Twenty-four staff members were returning from previous 
seasons so the staff was very experienced. While relatively few 
parent evaluation questionnaires were returned, they were generally 
positive and everyone said they would be back next year. 

We sold 260 tennis stickers this year for a revenue of $7,675 
as compared to 263 stickers the year before. We also generated 
$1,315 from field rentals, $4,885 from the basketball program and 
$1,281 from the youth dances. Overall, the recreation programs 
generated $167,800 which was significantly over the budgeted amount 
of $146,250. Because of this, the Town subsidy for recreation which 
had been projected to be $38,154 was actually only $697. Thus the 
bulk of the yearly recreation budget was covered by user fees and we 
currently anticipate that this will continue to be the case for the 
foreseeable future. 



145 



CELEBRATIONS COMMITTEE 

Neil Feinberg 
Clare Pinto 

The Committee's primary role is to coordinate all activities foi 
Lincoln's world famous July 4th Celebration, as well as other special, 
events, including Patriot's Day and Memorial Day. 

Saturday, July 4th, dawned drearily. For the first time I 
recent memory (at least ten years) rain forced postponement of 
Independence Day activities until July 5th. Early morning phone 
conferences between the Committee and Selectmen, as the rain began, 
led to the decision to delay festivities. A prudent decision, as it 
poured all day. 

The Committee scrambled to place signs around Town to inforn 
residents of the postponement and then kept their fingers crossed. 
Sunday, July 5th, turned out to be a marked improvement - partly 
sunny and seasonably mild. 

Events commenced with the 2nd Annual Old-Fashioned Firefighters' 
Pancake Breakfast, which served over 600. Road races were directed 
by Irene Rice and Meredith Slavin, while the Children's Parade 
Marshalls were Bob and Sally Hicks. The main parade then formed 
around the ballfield. The parade theme was the Spirit of 
Volunteerism, exemplified by Honorary Grand Marshalls Warren, Jr. and 
Margaret Flint. Parade Marshalls were Neil Feinberg and Kathy 
Madison. As in the past years, Connie Smith attracted numerous shiny 
antique cars, the Nays entertained, a flotilla of fire trucks from 
surrounding towns sounded their sirens and Town Boards and Committees 
strived to outdo themselves in originality, with Codman Farms winning 
the First Place votes of judges Pip Moss, Steve and Micki Lipsey, 
Eleanor Fitzgerald and Corkey Becker. 



After the award's ceremony at the school ballfield, there was a 
children's Magic Show and food supplied by the Boy Scouts and Codman 
Farms. As usual, Betty Smith's Tennis Tournament was a success as 
was the newly added Pick-up Softball Game. 

Evening events began with a Chicken/Rib Barbeque with Heatwave 
providing the entertainment; then came Diana Ryan's Model Rocketry 
Demonstration. The evening was capped off by the Spectacular 
Fireworks Display witnessed by a throng of thousands. In spite of 
the auspicious beginning, the Independence Day Celebration was a 
wonderful success. 



On Memorial Day, Father Lawrence Drennan of Lincoln's St 
Joseph's Church, presided at the solemn event. Lt. General Gordo 
Fornell from the Hanscom Air Force Base delivered an excellent 
speech; and a parade, led by members of the Lincoln Post of the 



. 



146 



American Legion, including Girl Scouts and Boy Scouts, marched from 
Bemis Hall to the Library. Refreshments were served on the Library 
terrace. 

No discussion of Celebrations Committee activities would be 
complete without acknowledging the work done over the past few years 
by member Jeffrey- Mudge. Jeff was an inspiration to his fellow 
Committee members with his tireless efforts to produce the single 
event that brought the most Lincolnites together. We note with 
sadness his passing away late last year. Jeff will be missed. 



147 



MATADEPERA EXCHANGE COMMITTEE 

Ann Parke 

Mickie Rice 

Susan Seeley 

Betty Smith, Acting Chairman 

In 1988, Lincoln agreed to become a sister city to Matadepera, 
Spain, a suburban town on the outskirts of Barcelona. The first 
exchange consisted of adults from the governments of each towr 
visiting each other. Next, in the summer of that year, two Lincolr 
students stayed in Matadepera and then hosted young people here. 
Since then teenagers from Spain and Lincoln have been participating 
in the program; however, the number of participants has beer- 
dwindling. The economy has been a factor plus the difficulty of 
finding homes for visiting students. 

The Committee sensed a need to re-form this year and is 
exploring new ways to develop the sister city relationships. We are 
now corresponding with the cultural office in Matadepera. Our 
Committee has talked at length with the Spanish teacher and the 
Principal of Brooks School. We are hoping to develop a small 
exchange between Brooks School and the public junior high school in 
Matadepera. Further, we have talked with the Council on Aging about 
an "Elder Hostel"-type program. We have also talked with the Lincoln 
Soccer League and they, too, are interested in finding out about an 
exchange. We do hope that the summer exchange program for "kids 
will continue and be strengthened. 

A thank you to all the families who have hosted students and to 
Suze Craig and Diana Smith who have helped with translations of mail, 
fax, and phone calls. 



148 



BEMIS LECTURE TRUSTEES 

Sara Mattes 
John Perry 
Irene Weigel 

During the calendar year 1992, the Bemls Trust Fund was used 
for a variety of purposes. 

On May 1, Mikhail P. Kazachkov, visiting fellow in the Human 
Rights Program at Harvard Law School, gave a talk entitled "Russia's 
Future: A View Out of the Gulag". 

In the fall of the year, the Bemis Trustees presented a cash 
gift to the Lincoln Public Schools to support an Artist in Residence 
Program. The 1992 artists were poets Victor Cockburn and Judith 
Steinberg who, through the scholastic year of 1992-3, worked with 
Hartwell and Brooks students and teachers on a collaboration of music, 
poetry and song. 

On November 13, the Bemis Trustees presented the first of a 
trio of programs celebrating the centennial year of the Bemis 
endowment. The Trustees chose to highlight Lincoln talent in this 
celebratory year. Accordingly, the first event was a screening of the 
feature film entitled: Mr. Johnson produced by Lincoln resident 
Michael Fitzgerald. After the film, Michael Fitzgerald spoke of the 
hazards and intricacies of film production, particularly in Nigeria 
where the film was shot. 

On December 13, the Bemis Trustees co-sponsored, with the 
Lincoln Historical Society, an "Architectural Tour of Bemis Hall" led 
by Earl R. Flansburgh, FAIA. 

The Bemis Trustees gratefully acknowledge the cooperation of 
the Lincoln Public Schools, and Michael and Kathy Fitzgerald. 

Town residents are welcomed and encouraged to submit ideas for 
events or feedback to any of the Trustees. 



149 



LINCOLN SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Maria Churchill 

Jim Coyne, Hanscom Representative 

Kharis McLaughlin, METCO Representative 

Henry Morgan 

Willard Mills, Hanscom Representative 

Patti Salem 

Agnes Wiggin 

Leslie Vagliano, Chair 

M. Rebecca van der Bogert , Superintendent 

1992 was marked by both positive change and relative calm for 
the Lincoln Elementary Schools. Together with the administrative 
team, Superintendent, parents and staff, the School Committee saw 
that the Lincoln Schools moved toward meeting our system wide goals. 
We maintained and increased the quality of school system governance, 
with parents and staff working closely together on the Hartwell and 
Brooks Advisory Councils. Work was all but completed on the system 
wide vision statement. The development of the statement included 
input from members of the Lincoln, Hanscom and Boston communities, 
parents, staff, and School Committee. Participants in the process 
engaged in many hours of thoughtful discussions about education and 
Lincoln's future schools. Some members of the group worked with 
Professor Roland Barth of the Harvard University School of Education 
and Dr. Benna Kallick in a series of workshops which explored the 
"visioning process". The creation of a system wide vision statement 
not only helped us focus our programmatic efforts on a more directed 
path but also provided an outstanding vehicle for creating a sense of 
unity and community in the schools. 

Another goal which has received attention this year was that of 
maintaining and increasing educational quality for all students in 
the system. To meet that goal, considerable work has been done on 
the curriculum review process. Although we eliminated the position 
of Director of Curriculum because of budget constraints, work was 
able to progress utilizing a more decentralized approach, with 
teachers working as team leaders guiding the process. We feel that 
this way of working on curriculum development will be a bit slower, 
but with teachers taking a more active leadership role, we are 
hopeful that the end product will be one that all participants buy 
into and implement. Substantial progress has been made by the 
Assessment Sub-Committee toward developing models for portfolio 
assessment. It is our intention to see the portfolio assessment 
model expanded for all core subject areas. In addition, a 
significant effort has been made at Hartwell in revamping the report 
card format. Teachers and parents have been actively working 
together on this task. 

Special Education continues to be an area on the cutting edge. 
Regular educators and special educators are teaming together to 
deliver services in the classroom. We have moved away from a 



150 



.Ipull-out model for the delivery of special education and remedial 
•services to an in-class service delivery model. The addition of a 
reading recovery specialist at Hartwell has already made a tremendous 
impact on our ability to detect reading difficulties early and offer 
intervention at the primary school level. The integrated preschool, 
tun in partnership with Magic Garden, the local day care provider, 
pas been working well. 

As part of our ongoing evaluation of policies, local 
conditions, and how they relate to current good practice, we reviewed 
jour class size and METCO policy. After a public and system wide 
process, the School Committee decided that it needed to update the 
jclass size policy. In recognition of our move toward more 
aggressively integrating special need students into regular education 
iclassrooms, the constraints of space in our classrooms, the discovery 
Imethod teaching style used in Lincoln, the use of heterogeneous 
(grouping, past practice in Lincoln and in surrounding communities, 
the class size policy was changed to a more flexible policy which 
ireflects current and past practice. The new policy for Lincoln calls 
for system wide targets of 22 with a maximum of 24 students in a 
class. Because of our belief that the early grades are most 
critical, smaller classes are to be found in kindergarten and first 
grade. The Hanscom Schools, because of the more transient nature of 
their population, has a class size policy which calls for a target of 
20 students per class system wide with a maximum of 22. Kindergarten 
has a target of 18 and first grade has a maximum of 20 students per 
class. It was the School Committee's belief that Lincoln's class 
size practice for the past decade is reflected in the new policy. We 
are now certain that pressure to reduce expenses will not mandate 
adherence to an outdated policy which did not reflect current or past 
educational judgments and practice. 

It was also the School Committee's belief that any discussion 
of class size necessarily included a review of the METCO policy. It 
was the Committee's feeling that given the current status of the 
building plans, budgets, enrollment projections and, most 
importantly, the vital nature of the METCO program, that it should 
revise the METCO policy in favor of a guaranteed seat policy which 
reserves two seats per classroom for METCO students while preserving 
a goal of four, to be realized depending on space availability and 
the Superintendent's discretion. The School Committee feels that 
this current policy reflects its belief in the importance of a strong 
METCO program for the future. The revised METCO policy and class 
size will work well together and help ensure the continuing quality 
of the Lincoln schools as we move toward the future. 

In order to meet the system wide goal of maintaining and 
increasing the efficiency of management service, the school system 
continued to work closely with the School Building Committee to 
develop a plan that will address the capital and programmatic needs 
of the Lincoln Campus. Considerable time and energy have been poured 
into providing support to the School Building Committee. The 
Listening Forum, held in the spring, provided the opportunity for 



151 



many members of the Town to provide input into the planning 
guidelines later adopted by the School Committee. Our Superintendent 
has worked tirelessly to meet the technical requirements that have 
been part of our emergency conversion to gas heat at the Smith 
School. Support from volunteers on the School Building Committee, 
Conservation Commission and from Town Offices helped shepherd the 
school through the conversion process. It is our hope that a 
comprehensive school renovation and building plan will be approved 
and initiated soon so that our administrators' time can once again be 
fully devoted to our kids and their schooling rather than dealing 
with time consuming processes generated by crises in a failing 
capital plant. 

We have moved toward our system wide goal of maintaining and 
increasing the effectiveness of school system communication in a 
variety of ways including focusing needed energies and ideas on 
dealing with transitions throughout the school system. Better 
communication with nursery schools and day care centers and increased 
contact with our high schools have furthered this goal. In 
particular, the Hartwell and Brooks staff and advisory councils have 
been meeting to increase communication between the two schools and to 
smooth the transition between them. Hanscom Primary and Middle 
Schools have continued to work closely together and a group trip is 
planned with Bedford for Hanscom Middle students moving to Bedford 
Jligh School. 

We have worked with the Finance Committee to improve and 
streamline the budgeting process. Many hours are consumed with 
developing budgeting strategies and negotiating operating budgets 
within the system and with other Town Boards. We would like to work 
toward finding a system for budgeting that did not consume such huge 
amounts of time and emotional capital. Every year we discuss making 
draconian cuts to the school budget and these discussions, even when 
theoretical, have a devastating effect on employee morale and divert 
energies from where they should be directed - programming for 
children. 

As always, tight budgets threatened the quality of our 
schools. Last year's override failure necessitated the reduction in 
teacher aides in the schools on the Lincoln Campus. We tried to keep 
the reductions as far away from the classroom as possible but the 
loss of the aides has been felt and has negatively affected the 
quality of school programming. Our budget cuts also resulted in the 
loss of one social worker position. Rebidding of the bus contract 
enabled us to maintain an almost comparable level of bus service this 
year. Increasing enrollments continue and are creating pressure on 
our budgets for the immediate future. As we prepare our budget for 
the next school year, we have tried to maintain the centrality of the 
classroom, keeping class sizes small and looking to other areas for 
cuts. 

The many volunteers we have in our schools have eased some of 
the pain caused by our limited budgets. Many thanks to an 



152 



outstanding PTA, METCO Coordinating Committee, Boston Parents Group, 
and Lincoln School Foundation for the time and money they have 
generously donated to our schools. Their support is critical and 
their continued presence contributes to the unique spirit that makes 
our school system so special. 

We were also fortunate to have an outstanding group of 
volunteers from the community and staff working on our Brooks School 
principal search. After seemingly endless hours sorting through a 
sea of qualified applicants, public interviews of the selected 
finalists were conducted and widely attended. The process ended last 
May and we are all delighted with our newest addition to the 
administrative team, Brenda Braithwaite. Brenda's skills as an 
educator and leader who believes in high standards and in a 
collaborative approach to running schools are an enormous asset to 
our system. 

The receipt of State monies at the end of last school year 
enabled us to invest in our technology plan. The combined Warrant 
Article funds and State monies represent an initial investment in 
upgrading the technology available to children in our schools. Our 
technology plan is still a long way from being a reality and we 
remain concerned that we are not incorporating technology into our 
school program as it is in most comparable communities. 

We have also devoted considerable time and energy to community 
related issues. Dialogues with our tenants, C.A. S.E., Magic Garden 
and L.E.A.P. are ongoing as we search for ways to plan for our 
increased enrollments with a shortage of school space. The School 
Committee and administration have also been involved in discussions 
with other Town Boards and volunteers dealing with the recreational 
needs of Lincoln's children. Skating rinks and ballfields have been 
the topic of much discussion as the schools articulate their support 
for children's activities while preserving the integrity of the 
school program and staff. 

The many proposals considered this year by legislators on 
Beacon Hill have been of great interest and concern. We have worked 
closely with members of the legislature to see that our school system 
is not hurt by any proposed change in State law. The School 
Committee sponsored an evening with our State Senator, Cile Hicks, 
which was attended by members of the Regional School Committee and 
members of the Board of Selectmen. All three Boards worked well 
together to articulate their shared concerns about the effects of 
mandates for consolidation of school districts into K-12 regions . 
Members of the School Committee made a positive impact on the reform 
package through their lobbying efforts at the annual MASC convention 
in Hyannis and through collaboration with other school committees 
from other towns who shared concerns with Lincoln. We feel that many 
of the reforms that will be mandated represent practice that we in 
Lincoln have been following already, such as school based management, 
a policy only school committee, and commitment to teacher training 
and professional development. We still await the final outcome of 



153 



the legislative process, but are hopeful that the end result will be| 
one that is beneficial to all Massachusetts children. 



This year we have been in negotiations with all four school 
unions, the secretarial union, teachers' union, custodians' union an 
the administrative team's union. Our negotiation with the 
secretaries has been resolved amicably with a contract that is fai 
and responds to the town's need for fiscal restraint. As of this 
writing, we are still involved in varying stages of negotiations with 
the other collective bargaining units. 



! 



This year has been a good one for the Lincoln schools, 
characterized by system wide calm, support from parents and continued 
forward movement. All this was made possible by the outstanding I 
leadership and wisdom of our Superintendent, Rebecca van der Bogert. 
Her never ending supply of energy, good humor, insight and belief 
that we need to always keep the best interests of kids in mind has] 
been the fuel that has kept our system running. We have also beeni 
fortunate to have an exceptional administrative team: Joanne 
McManus, Hartwell Principal; Brenda Braithwaite, Brooks Principal; 
Sally Weber, Hanscom Primary Principal; Ron Hadge, Hanscom Middle 
School Principal; Carroll Blake, METCO Director; Dot Olson, Director 
of Pupil Services; Bob Budds, Director of Plant Operations and 
Maintenance; and Julianna Phillips, Business Manager. We would like 
to recognize what an important contribution they all made to the 
lives of our children. 

We have also had to say goodbye to some members of our 
Committee. Jennifer Donaldson decided not to seek another term on 
the Board. Her contributions to the board and the Town were many, 
Patti Salem was elected to the seat left by her departure. Tony 
Sharon and Lino Mianni from Hanscom made significant contributions to 
the Board. They were replaced by Jim Coyne and Willard Mills. 
Kharis McLaughlin was elected to another one year term on the Board 
as the METCO Representative and we are pleased that she will continue 
to be an important member of the Committee. 

Our relationship with Hanscom continues to be an important one 
for the Lincoln Schools. Our Superintendent and School Committee 
enjoy a close working relationship with the Hanscom community. We 
are able to learn from each other and function well as a system 
together while recognizing the individuality of each community. Our 
work together on the vision statement has cemented the bond between 
the two communities. 

The Lincoln schools continue to be a source of pride for the \ 
Town. The challenge that remains for us is to meet the always rising 
community expectations for educational excellence and individualized 
education while coping with increasing enrollments and tight 
budgets. The collaborative spirit that has been fostered by the work i 
of our Superintendent will help us move forward together to meet 
these challenges in the future. 



154 



CLASS OF 1992 



turgis I. Adams 
Jacob Allen-Fahlander 
Jeremy Michael Brodney 
Benoite Cagnioncle 
Jennifer Lianna Capone 
/eoung C. Chau 
Christopher Crosby 
David Andrew Cotoni 
timberlee Rachel Dean 
Jacques David Delori 
Abigail Alcock Donaldson 
la chary Logan Driscoll 
Julia W. Feldman 
Liza Ann Feldman 
Carin Isabelle Gechter 
5raham Grindlay 
Caitlin Burns Haggerty 
Canesha De lores Hammond 
Jill M. Ireland 



Maya Jairam 

Bridgett Leora Jennings 
Robert Lee 

Benjamin Seth Lipsey 
Laura Beth Loewenstein 
Elizabeth Snow MacNeil 
Nicholas W. Miller 
Ja'net Mitchell 
Rasheed Allen Parham 
Margo Jeanne Rice 
Curtis A. Risley, Jr. 
Ivy M. Risser 
Shirin Sioshani 
Matthew Harry Solar 
Miriam Speert 
Mary Kathleen Stam 
Sean W. Terrio 
Marissa Lauren Tomasic 
Elizabeth Ellen White 



155 



LINCOLN PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 



M. Rebecca van der Bogert 
Juliana Phillips 
Dorothy Olson 
Robert Budds 
Carroll Blake 
Joanne McManus 
Brenda Brathwaite 
Sally Webber 
Ronald Hadge 



Superintendent of Schools 

Business Manager 

Director of Pupil Services 

Director of Plant Operations 

METCO Director 

Principal, Hartwell School 

Principal, Brooks School 

Principal, Hanscom Primary School 

Principal, Hanscom Middle School 



Hours: The Office of the Superintendent 
Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 



is open Monday through* 



156 



OCTOBER 1, 1992 ENROLLMENT 









STUDENTS 




SCHOOL 


GRADE 


SECTIONS 


() = 


BOSTON 


TOTALS 


Hartwell 


K 


3 


57 


( 6) 






K-l 


1 


19 


( 2) 






1 


3 


63 


( 6) 






2 


4 


77 


(11) 






3 


3 


64 


(11) 






4 


3 
17 


62 


(12) 


342 (48) 


Brooks 


5 


3 


55 


(10) 






6 


3 


55 


(11) 






7 


3 


52 


( 8) 






8 


2 
11 


35 


( 3) 


197 (32) 




LINCOLN 


CAMPUS TOTAL: 






539 (80) 


Hanscom Primary 


K 

1 


5 
5 


90 
95 








2 


5 


92 








3 


4 
19 


72 




349 


Hanscom Middle 


4 


5 


88 








5 


4 


80 








6 


3 


67 








7 


3 


60 








8 


3 
18 


59 




354 




HANSCOM CAMPUS TOTAL: 






703 



LINCOLN PUBLIC SCHOOLS TOTAL; 



1242 



CASE and outside placements - Lincoln: 8 
(for October 1, 1992) - Hanscom: 12 



157 



SCHOOL BUILDING COMMITTEE 

Doug Adams 

Ken Bergen 

Esther Braun, Vice Chair - June 1992 

Susyrati Bunanti, Appointed - June 1992 

Dan Cheever 

Crawley Cooper 

Priscilla Damon 

Mark Deck 

Rita DiGiovanni, Resigned - May 1992 

Lynn Donaldson, Resigned - May 1992 

Earl Flans burgh, Appointed - June 1992 

George Georges 

Priscilla Kern 

Bob Lemire 

Sara Mattes 

Kathy McHugh, Selectman 

Henry Morgan, School Committee Member 

Bill Stason 

Patti Salem, School Committee Member; Appointed Chair - June 1992 

Dr. Becky van der Bogert, Executive Director; Supt. of Schools 

The School Building Committee (SBC) has had a very busy, 
productive year. At the Annual Town Meeting in March 1992, th- 
citizens of Lincoln authorized $75,000 for the purpose of obtainiL 
architectural, engineering and other consultant or related service 
to assist the School Building Committee in developing three propose 
plans: a base line option, a fiscal constraints option, a School 
Building Committee recommendations option, to be held in ope 
meetings for necessary renovations to the Town of Lincoln's publi 
school buildings. 

However, these funds did not become available to the SBC unti. 
Town Meeting was dissolved in May. During this six week hiatus, t 
SBC experienced some changes in membership. 

Chairman Mary Helen Lorenz had tirelessly and expertly dir 
the Committee through the arduous initial tasks of the first l 
months (see Town Report 1992). Expecting to move temporarily t 
Europe in the summer, she resigned from her position and 
Committee. Her departure has left an irreplaceable void. 
Committee also lost other very valuable members: Rita DiGiovanni 
the vice chair, who, among other tasks, had spent innumerable hour 
addressing legal issues and negotiating contracts, and Lynn Donaldsn 
who spoke to the spirit of Lincoln. Their wisdom and insights C$ 
sorely missed. Harriet Todd, as representative for the Selectae 
did an able job explaining the financial implications of the Scho: 
Building Project. Maria Churchill and Leslie Vagliano spearhead | 
the School Facilities Study and represented the School Committee 
the School Building Committee. Their collective wisdom and visi 



158 



were the guiding light of this project and will have lasting impact. 
For all of their hard work, we are most grateful. 

In April, Henry Morgan and Patti Salem became the School 
Committee representatives and Kathy McHugh was the new representative 
of the Board of Selectmen. We also welcomed two new members, Earl 
Flans burgh and Susy Bunanti, who have proven to be valuable assets to 
the SBC. 

In June, the Committee began its assignment in earnest. The 
genesis of the School Building Project was a response to four 
distinct but interrelated needs of the Schools: 

. Need to protect our assets 

Need to upgrade program 

Need to accommodate increased enrollment 

Need to address handicapped accessibility 

Our first task was to determine the needs of the physical plant 
including handicap accessibility. A careful analysis by the SBC with 
the consulting architects revealed that the Town needs to spend 5.5 
million dollars on the School buildings if they wish to protect its 
assets. This is the baseline project. This option is ineligible for 
state funding, because it does not relieve overcrowding or improve 
program . 

After a "Listening Forum" in June, the School Committee revised 
the planning guidelines to the SBC. These guidelines form the 
backbone of the educational criteria which were subsequently 
developed . 

The integration of the planning guidelines, the most current 
enrollment projections and the asset protection plan resulted in 
options 2-5. The costs of options 2, 3 and 4 are estimated to be 
11 - 12 million dollars, while option 5 is estimated to be 15 - 16 
million dollars. Since plans 2 - 5 do relieve overcrowding and 
improve program, these plans are eligible for 54% reimbursement from 
the state. 

Educational benefits, cost and community benefits were the 
criteria which were then applied to each of the options. The 
educational benefits were determined by School Committee Planning 
Guidelines and input from staff and administrators. They encompassed 
the following categories: code compliance, time on task, quality of 
instruction and flexibility. The cost criteria included not only 
direct costs but indirect costs, such as operating expenses. 
Community benefits were defined as available space for LEAP, Magic 
Garden and the after school music program. 

During the month of October, the SBC had a series of public 
meetings which culminated in a Town Forum on October 27. The purpose 
of these meetings was twofold: 



159 



a progress report for citizens 

a forum for gathering citizen thoughts, ideas, 

reactions and responses 

The fall meetings were attended by more than 200 people. 

One recurring question raised during the public meetings was the 

practicality and cost of a new building. The SBC, working closely 
with the architects, designed option 6. The cost of that design is 

estimated to be 14 - 15 million dollars. 

As we studies the various options, it became apparent that the 
possibiility and probability of state funding is a key factor in any 
decision. A Town delegation met with the state funding agency (SFSB) 1 
in December. The meeting reconfirmed that it is in Lincoln's best 
interests to apply for SFSB eligibility by June 1, 1993. 

In response to our charge, the SBC is prepared to present three 
options to the Town at the Annual Town Meeting, one of which will be 
the preferred option of the Committee. 

The School Building Committee will recommend that the Town of 
Lincoln submit an application to SFSB on June 1, 1993. To do this,' 
the Committee will be requesting the Town to approve the spending of 
full design fees and to authorize bonding on the complete project. 



160 



LINCOLN- SUDBURY REGIONAL DISTRICT SCHOOL COMMITTEE REPORT 

William Hewins 

Sarah Cannon Ho Id en 

Geraldine Nogelo 

David Wilson 

Frederick Pryor, Vice- Chairman 

Phyllis Rappaport, Chairman 

Again the School Committee worked hard to support District 
goals of ensuring that curriculum experiences are appropriate to 
student needs, that faculty and staff meet high professional 
standards, and that resources are obtained and well managed for the 
benefit of our educational programs and physical plant. 

L-S 21, our strategic planning effort for curriculum review, 
became a school and community-wide effort to define educational 
visions that will serve us effectively into the next century. House 
masters Elizabeth Lewis and Charlie Roupp chaired a task force that 
met one day each month and for three days in June to summarize 
recommendations for further study. Committee members Sarah Cannon 
Holden, Gerry Nogelo, and Phyllis Rappaport participated with 
parents, community members, teachers, administrators, and 
Superintendent/Principal Matt King. The work has been expanded for 
Fiscal Year 1992-1993 and was the subject of an open forum in 
October, 1992. 

Our health curriculum became a year-long topic of conversation 
given the significant public health consequences of the deadly HIV 
virus. The Committee agreed to re-double the school's efforts in 
educating students to protect themselves from this and other sexually 
transmitted diseases. We convened a task force comprised of faculty, 
parents, and students to recommend appropriate actions and a 
curriculum promoting abstinance and good decision-making. 
Recommendations were received by May and implemented beginning 
September, 1992. 

As part of our efforts to maintain our physical plant, the 
Committee educated voters in both Lincoln and Sudbury and received 
authorization to borrow up to $2.1 million, exempt from Proposition 2 
1/2, for safety-related improvements including replacement of our 37 
year old boilers, which required 80% of the funds, plus renovation of 
some other critical items such as electrical service, wall systems, 
and an old synthetic gym floor. The towns will not feel any tax 
impact from this debt service until FY95. 

Another major focus for Committee efforts this year was our 
active pursuit of State legislators to hear our concerns regarding 
various reform bill initiatives. Members Fred Pryor and Dave Wilson 
represented us in conversations and hearings and we invited State 
Senator Robert Durand and State Representative Hasty Evans to a 
Committee meeting and other school visits. 



161 



Lincoln-Sudbury continues to enjoy strong support from parents 
and community members. We received $33,000 in funds raised by the 
Boosters Club to augment our athletic budget which already depends on 
student fees of $100 per sport. Our students were the beneficiaries 
of contributions raised through an active Scholarship Committee, 
Springthing, Black and White Night, and Friends of Music. The LSP0 
Newsletter remains an invaluable volunteer effort to keep parents and 
students well informed. We try to give something back to the towns 
through our concerts, theater events, exciting sports activities, aad 
our lectures and art shows offered through the L-S Community Program, 
an effort helped by Committee member Bill Hewins and several 
townspersons. 

We continued our sensitivity to budget concerns in both towns. 

In four years our budget has increased by a total of only 7%. This 

dramatic economizing was helped this year by an impressive 

administrator and faculty decision to reduce their annual salary 
increase by 50%. 

Dave Wilson, appointed in December, 1991, ran successfully in 
the March elections as did Gerry Nogelo, elected to her third term. 
Phyllis Rappaport and Fred Pryor were named Chair and Vice-Chair. 



162 



ANNUAL REGIONAL DISTRICT ELECTION 

The Regional District Election was held in conjunction with the 
elections in Lincoln and Sudbury on Monday, March 30, 1992, and 
certifications of the results were received from Nancy J. Zuelke, 
Town Clerk of Lincoln, and Jean M. MacKenzie, Town Clerk of Sudbury, 
as follows: 

For two 3-year terms: Lincoln Sudbury Total 

Geraldine C. Nogelo 691 1,760 2,451 
David P. Wilson 611 1,661 2,272 
Blanks 1,194 2,365 3,559 



Total 1,248 5,786 7,034 



163 



SUPERINTENDENT-PRINCIPAL'S REPORT 

Dr. Matthew King, Superintendent/Principal 

Returning to school this September we were surprised to find that 
our enrollment far exceeded that for which we had been planning. 
Whereas our enrollment projection showed a modest decrease, we began 
school with over sixty more students than we had been expecting. In 
analyzing this influx, we learned that new families were moving into 
our towns and that fourteen students were coming to us from \ 
independent schools. This shift in enrollment will cause additional 
pressures on us as we apparently no longer can count on fewer I 
students when we develop next year's budget. 

Life at Lincoln-Sudbury continues to be very full and f 
stimulating, both for students and adults. On any given week there 
is always something going on here. Our students are involved in 
music, drama, athletics, community service, and numerous clubs! 
organized around various interests. Our Community Program, which i 
seeks to get our students and faculty out in the communities, , 
performing and sharing their knowledge and experiences with community i 
groups, continues to be very well received. 

The central challenge facing Lincoln-Sudbury continues to be 
balancing our commitment to improve and strengthen the school with 
the limitations imposed by these difficult economic times. We] 
continue to look for ways to reduce our expenses and to elevate our 
services. One area where we have experienced dramatic results is in 
special education where, over the past three years, we have 
dramatically reduced the number of students we tuition out, saving us 
several hundred thousand dollars, by expanding our programs in the 
school. 

Among other improvement efforts are several that should be noted 
in this report. After a thorough review of the ways that we 
recognize academic achievement we instituted an "L-S Scholar" 
designation for students who receive all "A"s and "B"s for their 
semester grades. A great deal of work also was devoted to 
researching how we want to respond to the public health consequences 
of the HIV virus and AIDS. Though this is one of those issues about 
which there will always be differences of opinion, we listened openly 
and reached a conclusion that we believe will best protect our 
students. 

Another area where there has been considerable progress is in the 
integration of computers where there are two major developments to 
report. First, we formed a Computer Advisory Committee that includes; 
members from industry and universities to help us develop a strategic 
plan that we hope to implement over the next several years. Second, 
thanks to a generous sixty-two thousand dollar grant from the Sudbury j 



164 



Foundation, we now have a state-of-the-art computer laboratory for 
our Mathematics Department. In the three months that the lab has 
been in use we are already seeing exciting use of the facility and 
heightened enthusiam by members of the department. The support of 
the Sudbury Foundation during these difficult economic times has been 
a tremendous boost to the school. 

After completing formal curriculum assessments of the English, 
Mathematics and Science Departments we are now focusing our energies 
on the L-S 21 effort. The large study group that met last year has 
completed its mission and has reconvened into several smaller study 
groups around specific themes such as Civic Understanding, Fine Arts, 
and Scheduling. Though the issues are complex, we are energized by 
this unique opportunity of looking candidly and openly at how we can 
shape this school to meet the challenges of the next century. With 
the continued support of our Towns, I am confident that 
Lincoln-Sudbury will adapt and respond to these challenges. This is 
a school with a rich past and a bright future. 



165 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL 
GRADUATES— CLASS OF 1992 



Justin S. Albee 
Mark Douglas Arees 
Sara W. Ashenfelter 

Heather Elizabeth Baker 

Heather Anne Ball 

Samuel John Barrett 

Keith J. Beagan 

Ryan E. Beagin 

Jeffrey T. Becker 

Greg A. Bedard 

Jeffrey M. Bell 

Malin Chatrin Bengtsson # 

Ian Michael Bensman 

Jacqueline Bentick 

Jeffrey Malcolm Bentick 

Bert Hervey Berthole 

David Ephriam Bosnak 

Richard Brenner 

Daniel Brodney 

Aaron Daniel Brown 

Christopher Carroll Brownlee 

Robert M. Bryant 

Michelle Ann Buonopane * 

Timothy Charles Burke 

Lisa J. Burnham 

Rahsaan Alleyne Burroughs 

Sonya Rochelle Butler 

Christopher J. Byrd 

Brett Andrew Cala 
Deborah I. Cane 
Lisa J. Cavallerano 
Nicole Cavallerano 
Brian Cefola 
Lisa Reyes Champon 
Khing-San Chau 
Michael J. Colligan 
Brendon James Collins 
Christopher S. Costello 
Tyrone S. Croom 
Jeffrey Paul Cutler * 

Andrea D'Elia 

Jonathan Christopher Daniels 

Matthew E. Dash 

Monica L. Dean 

Barbara A. DeFranco 



Justine Francoise Delori * 
Eric James DeMille 
James DeNormandie * 
James David DePompei 
Mo ha Samir Desai 
Rebecca F. Devine 
Sadhana Dhruvakumar* 
Khary Imara Dickson 
Nicole Joanna Digenis* 
Kevin F. Do Ian 
Brendan J. Downey 

Joseph Alexander S. Elias 
Lauren Britt Elmore* 
Jonathan Harris Epstein 
Levence S. Eutsay 
Karen Marie Evans 

Christina Rose Fagone 
Elizabeth Connor Fallon 
Nadia Turan Faramarzpour 
Nathaniel White Farny* 
Zahra Farrokh-Pars 
Penny Alison Feldstein* 
Candice Saraantha Fink 
Scott Fitzgerald 
Lisa Flier* 
Gail Foster 
Lynn Catherine Fraser 
Rosalind Freeman*# 
Timothy Raymond Fryatt 

Mark R. Gainer 

LaKeisha Monique Gandy 

Sara G. Gardiner 

Nadeige S. Genece* 

Peter George 

Thomas R. Gilmore III* 

Aprel Goddard 

Adam John Goldsmith 

Jacqueline Michelle Goldstein 

Pamela D. Gordon 

Tamare L. Gordon 

Rebecca Lee Gorgone 

David I. Gorovitz 

Kya R. Graham 

Eric Andrew Gustafson 



166 



Jed Hammel 
Karen Ann Hammer 
Carolyn Anne Hansford 
Patrick Healy 
Paul Francis Healy III 
Rachelle Hecht* 
Brendon Hegarty 
Amy Meggan Heinecke 
Elizabeth A. Henshaw 
Daniel Hale He wins 
Stephen Matthew Hogan 
Marcus Holloway 
Charles Horowitz 
Annjanette Howard 
Scott Hull 
Andrew Hunter 
James Hwang* 

Dawn A. Jacob 
Sean Jenney 
E. Craig Jewell 
Todd Jewett 

Patricia Kao* 

Scott Kapin 

Damon Karys 

Utshudi John Kasongo 

Laura Lynn King 

Harrison Klein 

Car a Alexandra Knauer 

Jennifer L. Kopf* 

Nicole Emilie Kosersky 

Alison Kramer 



Heather L. Mayer* 
Talitha Fawn McAdams 
Lisa Anne McAndless 
John J. McEleney 
Christopher Anthony McLean 
Jacqueline Eldora McNeill 
Julie Macbeth Meier 
Karen A. Monaco 
Nancy Monahan 
Albert F. Montgomery, Jr. 
Michelle Moody 
Christopher R. Moore 
Scott Andrew Morrissey 
Paula M. Mullin 
Brendon Murphy 

Ira R. Nemeth 
Billy Njorge 
Elizabeth R. Novak 

Michael Robert Ogar 
Helene Omansky 
Michael Onigman 

Benjamin Davis Parker 
Katherine E. Patton 
Daniel R. Peppercorn* 
Todd A. Piken 
K. Jennifer Piatt 
Andrea Priest 
Heather Przybylinski 

Carrie Ann Quinn* 



Nicole Lahaise 

Michelle Landi 

Tracy Anne Langmaid 

Joel Lee 

Elizabeth A. Levine*// 

Aaron Lindenberg*// 

William Joseph Lindo 

Matthew M. Locsin 

Beth Ann Longo 

Robert Luke, Jr. 

David Christopher Lyndon 

Michael P. MacDonald 
Emily Mack 
Michael Maher 
Karam N. Maira 
Adrienne Aileen Marcus* 
Brian Stephen Marobella 



Thomas J. Racicot 
Jeremy Mark Rawlins 
Christopher William Reed 
David J. Reinherz 
Emily Elizabeth Reising 
Charles V. Rice 
Melissa Noelle Ritchie 
Timothy Ewan Forbes Robb 
Timothy Andrew Roberts 
Tyria Cammica Roebuck 
Steven Rose 
Steven Andrew Rosen 
Jeffrey Matthew Roth* 
James A. Roush 
Carrie A. Rovner 
Nancy Roys 
Paige Alison Ruddy 



167 



Rajni Samavedam 
Alexander J. Sanda 
La dawn L. Savage 
Benjamin R. Schaeffer 
Daniel Vincent Schirf 
Gretchen A. Schwamb 
Charles D. Scott 
Kimberly J. Segien 
Jason P. Seneca 1 
Gregory Shaw 
Sara Anne Sherman* 
Katryn Shineman 
Matthew C. Shulman 
Tahisha L. Skeen 
Amanda J. Smith 
Bevin Elizabeth Smith 
Megan Isabel Solo 
Sharon Louise Stadtfeld 
Yuri J. Stern 
Jeffrey Brian Stone 
Sarah Jane Stuart 
Stephen J. Sweeney* 



Kiersten Renee Tellis 
Douglas M. Thompson 
James A. Tomlin 
Matthew William Trail 
Maria Celeste Tucker 
Courtney Lauren Turner 
Mark Alden Valentine* 
Giannandrea Verri 

Jami L. Walker 
Brett C. Watson 
Valerie Weaver* 
Garth Wells 
Mark Allen Whipple* 
Karen E. White 
Nicole Winbourae 
Douglas Hamer Wood*// 
Keith Jonathan Wood*// 
Huiya Wu* 
Deborah L. Wyman 

Julie N. Zimmer 



* Cum Laude 

// Honors in History 



STUDENT EXCHANGE 



Anaia Camacho 
Frank Knippenber* 
Evan Noland 
Taras Potolov 



168 



DISTRIBUTION OF PUPILS ATTENDING REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL 
AS OF OCTOBER 1, 1992 



1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 



Lincoln 


123 


99 


98 


93 


99 


Sudbury 


887 


771 


749 


710 


710 


METCO 


92 


83 


75 


68 


73 


Other 


10 


13 


9 


17 


19 


TOTAL 1 


,112 


966 


931 


888 


901 


Boys 
Girls 


557 
555 


478 
488 


458 
473 


437 
451 


430 
471 


TOTAL 1 


,112 


966 


931 


888 


901 


9th Grade 
10th Grade 
11th Grade 
12th Grade 


267 
264 
255 
326 


226 
240 
261 
239 


224 
218 
237 
252 


212 
231 
220 
225 


230 
217 
235 
219 


TOTAL 1 


,112 


966 


931 


888 


901 


Tuition Pupils 
Attending 
Other Schools 


25 


32 


30 


28 


23 



169 



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170 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 

Treasurer's Report 

July 1, 1991 thru June 30, 1992 

Pauline M. Paste, Business Manager/ Treasurer 

Total Cash Balance, July 1, 1991 $ 



1,041,293.47 



District Fund 



Cash Balance, July 1, 1991 

Receipts : 

Operating Accounts 
Sudbury Assessment 
Lincoln Assessment 

Total Assessments 



6,367,490.01 
876,393.03 



Chapter 70 
Chapter 71 
Transportation Aid 
Total State Aid 

Anticipated Receipts 

Miscellaneous Income 
Petty Cash Refund 
Tailings 

Total Sundry Income 

Total Operating Receipts 

Deduction Accounts : 

Federal Withholding Tax $ 

Massachusetts Withholding Tax 

Federal Withholding Tax FICA 

Health Insurance 

Mass. Teachers' Retirement 

Middlesex County Retirement 

Disability Insurance 

Tax Sheltered Annuities 

Credit Union 

L-S Teachers' Association 

United Way 

Total Deduction Receipts 

Total District Fund Receipts 

TOTAL DISTRICT FUND INCOME 



679,463.00 
467,399.00 
224,437.00 



184,191.00 

118,302.14 
1,000.00 
(225.52) 



795,113.29 
320,812.46 

35,541.43 
143,867.59 
259,193.73 

99,063.40 

23,411.38 
239,288.56 
365,002.20 

22,670.34 
1,173.80 



$ 943,097.41 



7,243,883.04 

1,371,299.00 
184,191.00 

$ 119,076.62 
$ 8,918,449.66 



$ 2,305,138.18 
$ 11,223,587.84 
$ 12,166,685.25 



171 



Disbursements 



Operating Accounts 

Operating Budget $ 8,512,039.00 

Equipment Budget 72,766.23 

Capital Projects 0.00 

Debt Service - principal 150,000.00 

- interest 22,875.00 

Total Budget Disbursements 

Petty Cash Advance 1,000.00 

Excess & Deficiency Fund 91,106.42 

Deduction Accounts : 

Federal Withholding Tax 795,113.29 

Massachusetts Witholding Tax 320,812.46 

Federal Withholding Tax FICA 35,541.43 

Health Insurance 142,763.71 

Mass. Teachers 1 Retirement 259,193.73 

Middlesex County Retirement 99,073.29 

Disability Insurance 21,595.96 

Tax Sheltered Annuities 240,288.56 

Credit Union 365,002.20 

L-S Teachers 1 Association 22,670.34 

United Way 985.80 

Total Deduction Disbursements 

Total District Fund Disbursements 



$ 8,757,680.23 

1,000.00 
91,106.42 



2,303,040.77 
11,152,827.42 



Cash Balance District Fund June 30, 1992 1,013,857.83 

Cash Balance Revolving Accounts on June 30, 1992 269,594.34 

Total Cash Balance June 30, 1992 $1,283,452.17 



OUTSTANDING DEBT 

School Bonds, @ 6.1% $150,000 payable 8/15/92-93 

Total Debt 

EXCESS & DEFICIENCY FUND 



300,000.00 
300,000.00 



Cash Balance July 1, 1991 

Approved Transfer 

FY *92 Assessment Reduction 

Disbursements 

Cash Balance, June 30, 1992 



135,000.00 
127,000.00 
(16,604.16) 
(91,106.42) 

154,289.42 



172 



LINCOLN SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 



Balance Sheet 



June 30, 1992 
ASSETS 



Bank of Boston Bid 

Bank of Boston Checking 

Baybank Capitol 

MMDT 

Boston Safe Deposit & Trust Co. 

Boston Safe Deposit & Trust Co. 

TOTAL ASSETS 



$ 487,933.41 
65,210.47 
86,678.37 
515,110.45 
44,970.66 
83,548.81 

$1,283,452.17 



LIABILITIES AND RESERVES 

Surplus Revenue (Reserved for Assessments) 

Excess & Deficiency Fund 

Tailings 

Health Insurance 

Disability Insurance #1 

United Way 

Adult Education 

Athletics 

Booster Club 

Building Use 

Cafeteria 

Capital Outlay 

Computer Contract 

Damage to School Property 

Donations 

GAAD Grant FY 92 

Library Copy Machine 

Lost Books 

Medical Claims Trust Fund 

Nursery School 

PL 89-313 

PL 94-142 

Tuitition 

TOTAL LIABILITIES 



823,065.93 

154,289.42 

700.78 

26,708.67 

8,905.03 

188.00 

9,496.00 

17,832.14 

17,310.66 

21,166.47 

565.69 

7,769.92 

34,186.40 

(629.88) 

17,360.24 

155.87 

6,129.23 

7,385.01 

83,548.81 

10,039.63 

1,350.00 

5,260.48 

30,667.67 



$1,283,452.17 



173 



Scholarship Fund 
June 30, 1990 

Cash Balance, July 1, 1989 $ 207,583.16 

Receipts - principal 0.00 

- interest 10,389.70 

Disbursements - awards 18,000.00 

$ 199,972.86 
Funds Transfer to Lincoln- 
Sudbury Scholarship Foundation (199,972.86) 

Cash Balance, June 30, 1990 $ 0.00 



174 



LINCOLN SCHOLARSHIP COMMITTEE 

Mikki Lipsey 

Eugene Taylor 

Mary Spindler, Moderator 

The Lincoln Scholarship Committee is charged with providing 
financial assistance to high school seniors who are residents of 
Lincoln. Each June the Committee meets with Lincoln seniors who need 
financial aid for future education. In addition to interviewing with 
them, we review each student* s application to compare projected 
college costs and the student* s resources. 

In 1992 we were able to award $18,500 to six students. This 
amount was raised from the generous donations of Town residents and 
businesses. We are most appreciative of these gifts. We are 
especially grateful to the Codman Trustees, who doubled the funds 
that had been raised prior to August 31. We also thank the 
Commissioners of Trust Funds, who manage our portfolio. 

Based on applications and essays sent to the Committee, special 
awards were made in June at graduation to two Lincoln-Sudbury 
students. Aprel Goddard received the Sumner Smith Community Service 
Award, and Rachelle Hecht received the Fannie S. Campbell Award for 
her fine academic record and community service. The Committee gave 
each of them a book and $500. 

After years of service to the Committee, two members resigned 
this year. The Committee thanks Sherry Adams and Andy Hall, and 
welcomes two new appointees, Mikki Lipsey (Selectmen) and Eugene 
Taylor (School Committee). 

We hope the Town will continue to support the Scholarship Fund, 
as each year the costs of higher education continue to rise. There 
has been great need in this recessionary economy. The Committee is 
very grateful to the Town for making possible this needed assistance 
to our students. 



175 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL SCHOLARSHIP FUND COMMITTEE 
OFFICERS 

Patrick J. Mullen, Jr., President 
Emil Ragones , Treasurer 
Marilyn Thurman, Secretary 

DIRECTORS 

Sherry Dakss 
John Dolan 
Rosalind S. Spiller 
David Wilson 
Rita M. Zarella 

MEMBERS 

Maureen A. Dolan 

Wendy Kameny 

Ann Kramer 

Eileen McEleny 

Clare Mullen 

Marc Onigman 

Giselle Sampson 

Barbara Wolf 

Mathew Hyotte, Student Rep. 

Meridth Mattison, Student Rep. 

Mary Jane Sanders, Coordinator 

The Lincoln-Sudbury Scholarship Fund, through the generous 
contributions of the citizens and business organizations of Lincoln 
and Sudbury and the staff of Lincoln- Sudbury High School, in 1992, 
increased the endowment 19% to $674,010. This increase is a direct 
result of the phonathon and mail campaign held in November which is 
moving the capital campaign towards its goal of a $1,000,000 
endowment . 

The Sudbury Foundation has established a matching gift program 
where it will match the first $1,000 of each personal gift up to 
$50,000 per year for each year of the campaign. Additional direct 
scholarship money, $7,000, was raised by Springthing which is held 
the second Saturday in May. The success of Springthing is directly 
attributable to that large group of friends who so generously donate 
their time and talents. 

A faculty committee selects the recipients based on criteria 
established by the Fund Committee. The fund is available to any 
Lincoln-Sudbury senior class member with definite college plans and 
financial need. 



176 



The recipients of the 1992 scholarship awards were: 
Lincoln-Sudbury Scholarships 



Sonya Butler Scott Fitzgerald 

Christina Fagone Anjanette Howard 

Amy Heineke Giannandrea Verri 

Tyria Roebuck Lauren Elmore 

Jeffery Cutler Kya Graham 

Michael Maher 

Memorial Scholarship Awards: 

Sudbury Foundation Scholarship Robert Bryant 

Frank Heys Memorial Scholarship Michelle Moody 

John K. Wirzburger Memorial Scholarship Alexander Sanda 

John R. Kirshner Memorial History Award Keith Wood 

Bramwell B. Arnold Physics Award Adrienne Marcus 

Lily T. Spooner Memorial Scholarship Christopher Reed 
Malcolm L. and Eleanor L. Donaldson 

Scholarship Jennifer Piatt 

Edward J. McCarthy Memorial Scholarship Katherine Patton 



177 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY SCHOLARSHIP FUND COMMITTEE 
STATEMENT OF REVENUE, EXPENDITURES & FUND BALANCE 

Revenue : 1992 1991 1990 

Matching Funds Rec'd $ 54,308 $ 56,075 $ 56,065 

Contributions 45,549 47,942 56,043 

Investment Income 41,558 32,219 23*405 

Springthing 7,000 10,000 6,*500 

Total Revenue $148,415 $146,236 $142,013 

Expenditures : 

1992 1991 1990 

Total Scholarships Awarded $ 32,000 $ 38,000 $ 29,000 

(These are Two year grants of $1,000 per year) 

Operating Expense $ 8,508 $ 7,207 $ 13,972 

Total Expenditures 40,508 45,207 42,972 

Net excess of Revenue over 

Expenditures $107,907 $101,029 $ 99,041 

Fund Balance Ending $674,010 $566,103 $459,824 



For information concerning the Lincoln- Sudbury Scholarship Fund, 
Inc., call the Regional High School at 443-9961 or Pat Mullen at 
443-3168. 



178 



MINUTEMAN REGIONAL VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 







Term 






Expires 


Acton 


Robert Wiltse 


1994 


Arlington 


John P. Donahue 


1994 


Belmont 


Herbert M. Yood 


1995 


Bolton 


Position vacant 


1993 


Boxborough 


Kenneth Whitcomb 


1994 


Carlisle 


William Churchill, Secretary 


1994 


Concord 


Lawrence D. Lorah 


1995 


Dover 


Thomas E. Giblin 


1993 


Lancaster 


Fred A. Reed 


1994 


Lexington 


Nyles N. Barnert, Vice-Chairperson 


1993 


Lincoln 


Harold A. Levey, Jr. 


1995 


Needham 


Kenneth D. Mullen, Jr. 


1995 


Stow 


Mary E. Cutler 


1993 


Sudbury 


Glenn L. No land 


1995 


Wayland 


Elaine Sweeney, Chairperson 


1993 


Weston 


John M. Tucker 


1993 



Our world is very different than it was 20 years ago, so during 
1992 Minuteman Tech began a project involving the entire staff, the 
students and their parents in far-reaching changes that could 
eventually alter the entire structure of the school. Entitled 
"Project WIN", the project's goal is to provide all students with the 
academic, technical and personal skills that will be required by the 
work places of the 21st Century where: 

* a world economy has replaced our national economy as the 
context for competition among businesses, 

* technology (the ability to use or apply science) is a basic 
skill in the world of work, 

* 70% of the jobs will not necessarily require a college 
degree, but more and more of the better jobs will require 
skill training beyond that provided in both traditional high 
school and college programs, and 

* recent research on how the brain works and how different 
individuals learn best is revolutionizing the teaching 
process. 

Basic elements of Project WIN include: 

* the use of researched principles of brain-compatible teaching 
and accelerated learning as a foundation for all 
instructional programs, with teachers being provided with 
special training in these principles and teaching methods, 

* use of a Total Quality Management (TQM) approach to education 
that identifies and addresses the many factors affecting 
student learning success and the use of staff task forces to 
improve the quality contribution from any factor area, 

* placing a major emphasis on promoting a real-life orientation 



179 



to instruction through academic-vocational integration and 
the use of more complex, real-life outcomes and graduation 
standards to promote the higher order thinking skills 
required of 21st century workers. 

Volunteer staff members have been organized into three groups to 
work on the three elements described above, with a fourth group of 
staff members serving as a Board of Directors for Project WIN. We 
intend to operate a school in which every student "WIN" the highest 
levels of career success with our help. Our staff members have been 
placed in charge of providing constant improvement in service to 
students with a commitment to a "no fail" environment. 

Another event of 1992, which would have a profound effect on the 
future of Minuteman Tech, is the School Committee's decision to open 
the school to "choice" students. In the fall of 1992, the choice 
numbers were limited to 46 high school students. In future years, 
this number could be increased or decreased depending on a number of 
factors, including state funding of the program. 

Minuteman Tech continued its tradition of excellence during the 
1991-92 school year with a number of faculty, students and programs 
receiving national and state recognition. At the national level, 
Minuteman Tech swept the Vocational Clubs of America (VICA) national 
competition in baking with senior Barbara Craddock of Lincoln winning 
the high school division and Jeff Cohen of Lexington winning the 
post-graduate division. This is the second year in a row that a 
Minuteman post-graduate has won the national baking championship. 

Electromechanical Technology senior Alex Taliadouros of Dracut 
placed second in the national VICA Robotics Programming competition. 
During the past four years, competing against engineering students in 
junior colleges and 4-year universities, Minuteman Tech 
Electromechanical Technology students have earned one first place, 
two second places, one third place and one honorable mention at the 
Society for Mechanical Engineers robotics competition in Detroit, 
Michigan. 

At the 1992 state VICA competition, Minuteman Tech students won 
14 gold medals: Janet Poulon of Acton in Data Processing; 
post-graduate Judith Snell of Acton in Desktop Publishing; Eric 
Anderson, Frank Balurdi, and Stephen Moschella of Arlington in Auto 
Body, Welding and Carpentry respectively; post-graduate John Luca of 
Dedham in Automotive Service; Jeff Boire of Lancaster in Precision 
Machining; post-graduate Jeff Cohen of Lexington and Barbara Craddock 
of Lincoln in Baking; Ted Brown of Needham in Electrical Wiring, 
William Manosh of Stow in Automotive Service; Wayland post-graduates 
Rob Alger in Advertising Design, Gus Harting in Cabinetmaking and 
John Murray in Heating/Ventilation and Air Conditioning. 

The Massachusetts Department of Education named Minuteman Tech's 
Electromechanical Manufacturing Program and Biotechnology 



180 



Manufacturing Program as the state's outstanding secondary and 
post-secondary vocational technical education programs and nominated 
them for the U.S. Secretary of Education's Award for Outstanding 
Vocational Technical Education Programs in the U.S. We have been 
informed that both programs are finalists for the national award. 

Science/ Technology Department head James Amara was one of three 
Massachusetts recipients of the Presidential Award for Excellence in 
Science Teaching. Assistant Superintendent Beverly Lydiard was one 
of the five recipients of the Outstanding Achievement in Vocational 
Education Award given by the Massachusetts Department of Education. 

Baking Instructor Norman Myerow was elected president of the 
Massachusetts Chefs de Cuisine, the Massachusetts Chapter of the 
American Culinary Federation. 

Graphic Arts co-senior teacher Michael Ciccarelli has been asked 
to represent education on the Printing and Publishing Council of New 
England, Inc. He is also a board member of the Boston Litho Club and 
has just completed a term on the board of the Boston Club of Printing 
House Craftsmen. 

Child Care Center Director Karen Folk serves on the Educational 
Leadership and Accreditation Committees of the Boston Association for 
the Education of Young Children. She is also Chairperson of the 
Charles River AEYC and the Massachusetts Child Care Administrators of 
Secondary Schools. 

For the second year in a row a Minuteman Tech student was named 
one of the five Outstanding Vocational Technical students in 
Massachusetts. William Manosh of Stow received the 1992 award. 

Stephen Pierce of Townsend, a 1990 graduate of Minuteman 's Tech 
Prep program, earned the highest score in the state on the Navy's 
Nuclear Powered Operator test (composed of math and science problems) 
and was made an assistant instructor in the program. 

In athletics, Minuteman Tech students were selected for the 
Colonial Conference All Star teams in Field Hockey (Lisa Baia of 
Billerica, Sue Gentile of Watertown and Jody Demers of Belmont), 
Football (Chad Legay of Lancaster), Soccer (Ken Lania of Belmont and 
Ryan Whitcomb of Boxboro), Baseball (Dan Corey of Arlington), 
Softball (Lisa Baia of Billerica and Kristen Daley of Arlington), 
Girls Basketball (Barbara Craddock of Lincoln) and Boys Basketball 
(Dan Corey of Arlington) plus Commonwealth Conference All Star teams 
in Swimming (Amy Baker of Ayer), Wrestling (Jon Mills of Arlington) 
and Tennis (Hanna Scheichenost of Belmont and Christina Gentilucci of 
Watertown). Hanna and Christina won the Commonwealth Conference 
Womens Doubles Championship. 

During 1992 Minuteman Tech continued its outreach programs 
designed to help middle school students and teachers in district 



181 



towns become better acquainted with technology. Minuteman 's 
Technology Learning Center located in the Lancaster Middle School 
provided middle school students from Bolton, Lancaster and Stow with 
technology training and career awareness in the areas of electronics, 
robotics, computers, math/science integration and laser technology. 
In addition, middle school students from Arlington, Belmont, 
Lancaster, Lexington, Needham, Sudbury, Stow and Wayland came to 
Minuteman to spend a day in the school's technology labs building 
robots and learning about careers in technology. 

Funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation, during 
the summer middle school and high school students and faculty from 
Acton, Arlington, Belmont, Bolton, Boxborough, Carlisle, Lancaster, 
Lexington, Lincoln, Needham, Stow, Sudbury and Wayland spent a week 
at Minuteman Tech participating in a technology manufacturing 
seminar. They received hands-on experience in robotics and 
electronics manufacturing technology and learned about career 
opportunities in technology. 

During the past year there were a number of changes on the 
Minuteman Tech School Committee. Nine-year member and former 
Chairperson Linda Frizzell of Belmont was succeeded by Herbert M. 
Yood. Prior to becoming a member of the School Committee, Mrs. 
Frizzell was instrumental in establishing the annual Crafts Fair 
which continues to be a major fund-raiser for the Booster's Club and 
other school activities. Her dedication and tireless efforts on 
behalf of Minuteman will be greatly missed. 

Another long-time and dedicated member, Lawrence Ovian of 
Sudbury, was succeeded by Glenn Roland. Needham' s Mark Tobin, a 
hard-working member of the Committee for two years, was succeeded by 
Kenneth D. Mullen, Jr. Peter Stalker, who served effectively as 
Bolton's member on the Committee for four years, has also left. A 
replacement has not yet been appointed. 



182 



ENROLLMENT OCTOBER 1, 1992 



TOWN 


96 


95 


94 


93 


PG 


TOTAL 


j Acton 


13 


10 


9 


13 


6 


51 


Arlington 


35 


39 


56 


29 


28 


187 


\ Belmont 


9 


8 


6 


6 


7 


36 


j Bolton 


1 


1 


-6 


1 





9 


| Boxborough 


4 


3 


2 


2 


4 


15 


Carlisle 





3 





2 


1 


6 


Concord 


6 


7 


1 


4 


3 


21 


Dover 








1 


2 





3 


Lancaster 


2 


5 


3 


3 


1 


14 


Lexington 


12 


9 


6 


11 


9 


47 


Lincoln 








1 


3 


1 


5 


Needham 


9 


5 


10 


8 


7 


39 


Stow 


3 


4 


4 


15 


1 


27 


Sudbury 


4 


4 


4 


8 


6 


26 


Wayland 


3 


2 


6 


4 


3 


18 


Weston 








3 


1 





4 


Tuition 


56 


34 


38 


33 


22 


183 


TOTAL 


157 


134 


156 


145 


99 


691 


NOTE: Above 


enrollment figures 


do not 


include 


part time 


and/or 


short term program 


students such 


as SEP, 


Info Pro 


, Aesthetics, etc. 



183 



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186 



COMMISSIONERS OF TRUST FUNDS 

Virginia M. Niles 

Conrad H. Todd 

William B. Russell, Chairman 

For the fiscal year ended June 30, 1992, the principal, income, 
and bequests available for future investment were invested in U.S. 
Treasury securities. Various maturity dates were selected to provide 
flexibility with respect to the investment needs of each trust fund. 

In December 1992, the Commissioners forwarded to the 
administrators of each trust fund the financial statements for the 
previous fiscal year ended June 30, 1992, together with a cover 
letter highlighting the Fund's purposes and operating activity for 
the year. 

Again we recognize the valuable assistance of Cynthia Bouchard, 
Assistant Treasurer, whose efforts and commitment account for the 
timely and accurate financial reporting. 

Individual statements of each trust fund for the year ending June 
30, 1992 are submitted with this report. 



187 



BEMIS LECTURE FUND 
Administered by three elected Trustees 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1991 

Receipts: 
Interest Income 

Transfer from John Todd - FY 92 
Securities Matured 
Interest Applied to Amortize 
Capital Gain 



£29,426.30 



3,424.59 

3,628.11 , 

8,970.00 ' 

151.88 

30.00 

$45,630.88 



Payments: 
Honoraria per order of Trustees 

Julie Taymor 1,500.00 

Dr. Frank Newman 1,500.00 

Mikhail P. Kagachkoo 500.00 

Lecture Expenses 1,359.64 

Printing and Postage 900.59 

Purchase of Securities 23,856.88 

Ace. Interest 200.74 

Tran. Fee 92.86 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1992 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1992 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund 

$3,000 U.S. Treasury 7.25% 8/15/92 

$3,000 U.S. Treasury 10.875% 2/15/93 

$4,000 U.S. Treasury 9.00% 2/15/94 

$3,000 U.S. Treasury 5.50% 02/15/95 

$14,000 U.S. Treasury 7.75% 02/15/95 

$3,000 Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe 4.00% 10/1/95 

$2,000 U.S. Treasury 8.875% 2/15/96 

$1,000 U.S. Treasury 8.00% 10/15/96 

$3,000 U.S. Treasury 8.50% 5/15/97 

$6,000 U.S. Treasury 7.125% 10/15/98 

$2,000 Commonwealth Edison 8.00% 8/1/01 



Accumulated Income 
Principal 



29,910.71 
$15,720.17 



15,720.17 
3,000.00 
2,958.75 
4,000.00 
3,022.50 

14,682.50. 
3,000.00 
2,000.00 
977.82 
2,965.31 
6,000.00! 
1,947.50 
$60,274.55 

28,147.48 

32,127.07 : 

$60,274.55' 



188 



CEMETERY PERPETUAL CARE FUND 
Administered by the Cemetery Commissioners 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1991 $19,672.54 

Receipts: 

Interest Income 3,410.18 

Sale of Lots 3,507.00 

$26,589.72 

Payments: 

None 0.00 

fash Balance at June 30, 1992 $26,589.72 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1992 

jMDT Composite Trust Fund $26,589.72 

B3,000 U.S. Treasury 9.00% 11/15/93 2,995.32 

fl0,000 U.S. Treasury 8.625% 8/15/94 10,000.00 

15,000 U.S. Treasury 8.875% 7/15/95 4,978.13 

1)10,000 U.S. Treasury 8.00% 10/15/96 9,778.10 

$54,341.27 

Accumulated Income 22,968.00 

Principal 31,373.27 

$54,341.27 



189 



ABBIE J. STEARNS FUND FOR THE SILENT POOR 
Administered by the Board of Selectmen 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1991 t 281.36 
Receipts: 

Interest Income 100.78 

$ 382.14 

Payments: 0.00 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1992 $382. 14 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1992 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund 382.14 

$1,000 U.S. Treasury 8.625% 10/15/95 1,000.00 

$1,382.14 

Accumulated Income 157.09 

Principal 1,225.05 

$1,382.14 

JOHN TODD TRUST FUND 

Administered by the Board of Selectmen and 

the Bemis Lecture Trustees 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1991 $1,175.00 
Receipts: 

Interest Income 4,473.15 

Capital Gain 175.00 

Securities Matured 23,825.00 

Interest Applied to Amortize 431.25 

35,079.40 

Payments: 

Purchase Securities 29,536.25 

Accrued Interest 795.04 

Coram. 50.00 

Transfer to Bemis FY92 3,628.11 

$34,009.40 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1992 $1,070.00 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1992 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund 1,070.00 

$15,000 U.S. .Treasury 7.00% 01/31/93 15,000.00 

$14,000 U.S. Treasury 5.50% 02/15/95 14,105.00 

$30,175.00 

Accumulated Income 0.00 

Principal 30,175.00 

$30,175.00 



190 



TRICENTENNIAL TRUST FUND 
Administere-i by the Board of Selectmen 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1991 $ 170.62 

Receipts: 

Interest Income 270.95 

$ 441.57 

Payments : 

None 0.00 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1992 $ 441.57 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1992 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund $ 441.57 

£3,000 U.S. Treasury 8.525% 10/15/95 3,000.00 



Accumulated Income 2,441.57 

Principal 1,000.00 






$3,441.57 

2,441.57 

1,000.00 

$3,441.57 



DONALD GORDON RECREATION FUND 
Administered by the Board of Selectmen 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1991 $4, 217. 52 
Receipts: 

Interest Income 629.26 

Securities Matured 990.00 

Capital Gain 10.00 

$5,846.78 

Payments : 

Purchase of Securities 1,027.19 

Accrued Interest 16.34 

Transaction Fee 2.94 1,046.47 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1992 $4,800.31 

Cash and Securities at Cost - June 30, 1992 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund 4,800.31 

$1,000 U.S. Treasury 10.875% 2/15/93 986.25 

$1,000 U.S. Treasury 8.625% 10/15/95 1,000.00 

$2,000 U.S. Treasury 8.00% 10/15/96 1,955.64 

$1,000 U.S. Treasury 6.875% 03/31/97 1,027.19 

$9,769.39 

Accumulated Income 4,527.07 

Principal 5,242.32 

$9,769.39 



191 



LINCOLN CONSERVATION FUND 
Administered by the Board of Selectmen 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1991 $1,162.90 

Receipts: 

Interest Income 54.17 

$1,217.07 
Payments: 

None 0.00 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1992 $1,217.07 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1992 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund $1,217.07 

Accumulated Income $1,217.07 

JANE HAMILTON POOR SCHOLARSHIP 
Administered by the Board of Selectmen 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1991 $109.17 

Receipts: 

Interest Income 281.62 

$390.79 
Payments : 

Transfer to Scholarship FY 92 281.62 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1992 $109.17 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1992 

MMDT-Composite Trust Fund 109.17 

$3,000 U.S. Treasury 9.00% 2/15/94 3,000.00 

$3,109.17 

Accumulated Income 1,874.17 

Principal 1,235.00 

$3,109.17 



192 



JOSEPH BROOKS GRAMMAR SCHOOL FUND 
Administered by the Board of Selectmen 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1991 £235.71 

Receipts: 

Interest Income 98.68 

$334.39 

Payments: 

Transfer to Town FY 92 98.68 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1992 $235.71 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1991 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund 235.71 

$1,000 U.S. Treasury 8.625% 10/15/95 981.56 

Principal $1,217.27 

LAWRENCE H. GREEN FUND 



Administered by the President of the Lincoln PTA, the Chairman of 
the Lincoln Elementary School Committee and the Superintendent of the 
Lincoln Elementary Schools. 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1991 $1,233.52 

Receipts: 

Interest Income 142.82 

$1,376.34 

Payments : 

Brooks School Book Award 1991 56.00 

Lawrence Green Memorial Award 1992 204.00 

$ 260.00 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1992 $1,116.34 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1992 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund 1,116.34 

$1,000 U.S. Treasury 8.625% 10/15/95 981.56 



Accumulated Income 790.25 

Principal 1,307.65 



$2,097.90 

790.25 
1,307.65 
$2,097.90 



193 



CHRISTINE PATTERSON FUND 

Administered by the Principal of the Brooks or Hartwell School, al 
staff member of the Brooks or Hartwell School, and a parent selected 
by the Board of Directors of the Lincoln PTA. 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1991 $3,045.57 

Receipts: 

Interest Income 1,109.41 

$3,670.57 

Payments : 

"Artist in Residency" Troubadour's Prog. 2,496.59 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1992 $1,658.39 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1992 



MMDT Composite Trust Fund 1,658.39 

$10,000 U.S. Treasury 8.625% 10/15/95 9,815.65 

$1,000 U.S. Treasury 8.875% 2/15/96 1,000.00 



Accumulated Income 1,048.99 

Principal 11,425.05 



LINCOLN STABILIZATION FUND 
Administered by the Board of Selectmen 



$12,474.04 

1,048.99 
11,425.05 
$12,474.04 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1991 $3,161.76 
Receipts: 

Interest Income 514.16 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1992 $3,675.92 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1992 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund $3,675.92 

Accumulated Income $3,675.92 



194 



DE CORDOVA SCHOOL EQUIPMENT FUND 
Administered by the Board of Selectmen 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1991 

Receipts: 

Interest Applied to Amortize 
Interest Income 
Securities Matured 
Capital Gain 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1992 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1992 



$1,345.92 



151.88 

1,982.47 

4,938.75 

93.15 







$8,512.17 


Tiients : 

Transfer to Town - FY 92 


2,057.22 




Purchase of Securities 


4,108.75 




Accrued Interest 


65.37 




Transaction Fee 


11.76 


6,243.10 



$2,269.07 



MMDT Composite Trust Fund 
$2,000 U.S. Treasury 9.00% 2/15/94 
$1,000 U.S. Treasury 7.00% 4/15/94 
$2,000 U.S. Treasury 8.625% 8/15/94 
$2,000 U.S. Treasury 12.625% 5/15/95 
Treasury 8.625% 10/15/95 
Treasury 8.875% 2/15/96 
$2,000 Southern N.E. Telephone 5.75% 11/1/96 
$4,000 U.S. Treasury 6.875% 3/31/97 
$1,000 U.S. Treasury 8.50% 5/15/97 
$1,000 Commonwealth Edison 8.00% 8/1/01 
$3,000 U.S. Treasury 8.75% 11/15/08 

Principal 



$3,000 U.S. 
$2,000 U.S, 



2,269.07 

2,000.00 

972.81 

2,000.00 

1,962.50 

3,000.00 

2,000.00 

2,000.00 

4,108.75 

988.44 

973.75 

2,925.00 

$25,200.32 



195 



LINCOLN SCHOLARSHIP FUND 



Administered by three Trustees, one each appointed by 
Selectmen, the Lincoln School Committee and the Town Moderator 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1991 
Receipts: 

Interest Income 

General Appeal 

Securities Matured 

Transfer from Jane Poor Fund 

Capital Gain 



Payments : 

Grants per order of Trustees 

Awards 

Printing and Postage 

Purchase of Securities 

Accrued Interest 

Transaction Fee 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1992 



21,450.00 

62.91 

470.55 

16,139.69 

308.73 

2.94 



$21,936.23 

11,095.09 

14,576.00 

15,981.25 

281.62 

18.75 

£63,888.94 



38,434.82 
£25,454.12 



Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1992 



MMDT Composite Trust Fund 
$11,000 U.S. Treasury 10.875% 2/15/93 
$10,000 U.S. Treasury 7.00% 1/15/94 
$6,000 U.S. Treasury 7.00% 4/15/94 
$1,000 U.S. Treasury 8.625% 8/15/94 
$10,000 U.S. Treasury 10.125% 11/15/94 
$15,000 U.S. Treasury 5.50% 02/15/95 
$10,000 U.S. Treasury 8.875% 7/15/95 
$4,000 U.S. Treasury 8.625% 10/15/95 
$5,000 Ohio Power Co. 5.00% 1/1/96 
$9,000 U.S. Treasury 8.875% 2/15/96 
$6,000 So. N.E. Telephone 5.75% 11/1/96 
$1,000 U.S. Treasury 6.875% 03/31/97 
$10,000 U.S. Treasury 8.50% 5/15/97 
$6,000 U.S. Treasury 7.875% 1/15/98 
$5,000 Commonwealth Edison 8.00% 8/1/01 
320 Shares Exxon Corporation 
100 Shares NIPSCO Industries, Inc. 

Principal 

Robert L. DeNormandie Funi 
Lincoln 4-H Horse Club Fund 
Ernest P. Neumann Memorial Fund 
Eleanor Tead Fund 
Ogden Codman Endowment Fund 

Accumulated Income 



1,000.00 
1,770.00 
6,005.00 
1,120.00 
9,645.00 



25,454.12 

10,181.88 

9,946.88 

5,836.88 

1,000.00 

10,000.00 

15,112.50 

9,956.24 

3,926.24 

4,987.50 

9,000.00 

6,000.00 

1,027.19 

9,943.75 

5,934.38 

4,868.75 

3,016.85 

2,973.63 

$139,166.79 



19,540.00 

119,626.79 

$139,166.79 



196 



JOHN H. PIERCE LEGACY 



Administered by the Board of Selectmen and managed by the 
Pierce Property Committee 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1991 
Receipts: 

Interest Income 

Use of Pierce House - Fees and Deposits 

Elsie Pierce Trust 

Securities Matured 

Capital Gain 



$46,351.77 

11,874.99 

52,827.95 

3,454.51 

11,880.00 

120.00 

$126,509.22 



Payments: 

Grants per order of the Selectmen 

COA - Podiatry Clinic 1,875.00 

60+ Health Clinic 1,645.00 

Pierce Park Drainage 154.20 

Pierce House Expenses 

Supplies and Furnishings 5,944.05 

Repairs and Maintenance 2,931.34 

Manager Compensation 12,269.50 

Gas for Heating 4,137.98 

Other Utilities 4,345.20 

Mowing Pierce Park 4,104.33 

Carpentry & Roof Repairs 30,162.10 

Rubbish Removal 2,764.50 

Return of Deposits 13,040.00 

Purchase of Securities 12,129.38 

Ace. Int. 227.59 

Tran. Fee 5.88 



95,736.05 
Cash Balance at June 30, 1992 $30,773.17 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1992 



Unrestricted as to Principal and Income 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund 

$3,000 U.S. Treas. 7.25% 8/15/92 

$5,000 U.S. Treas. 10.875% 2/15/93 

$3,000 U.S. Treas. 9.00% 2/15/94 

$1,000 U.S. Treas. 

$2,000 U.S. Treas. 

$5,000 U.S. Treas. 

$5,000 U.S. Treas. 



8.875% 2/15/96 
6.875% 3/31/97 
8.50% 5/15/97 
8.75% 11/15/08 



30,760.87 
3,000.00 
4,931.25 
3,000.00 
1,000.00 
2,054.38 
4,942.19 
4,875.00 



54,563.69 



197 



JOHN H. PIERCE LEGACY 

Restricted as to Principal 

MMDT - Cash 12.30 

$10,000 U.S. Treas. 7.25% 8/15/92 9,937.50 

$10,000 So. Cal. Ed. Co. 7.125% 1/15/94 10,000.00 

$1,000 U.S. Treas. 9.00% 2/15/94 1,000.00 

$1,000 U.S. Treas. 8.625% 8/15/94 1,000.00 

$10,000 U.S. Treas. 5.50% 2/15/95 10,075.00 

$20,000 U.S. Treas. 9.50% 11/15/95 20,000.00 

$10,000 Ohio Power Co. 5.00% l/l/96 9,975.00 

$5,000 So. N.E. Tel. Co. 5.75% 11/1/96 5,000.00 

$10,000 Fla. P &.L Co. 6.00% 12/1/96 10,000.00 

$10,000 Pac. Gs & Ele. Co. 4.625% 6/1/97 10,000.00 

$10,000 Am. T & T Co. 4.75% 6/1/98 10,000.00 

$10,000 Duke Power Co. 7.00% 2/1/99 10,000.00 

$10,000 S.W. Bell Tel. Co. 8.25% 3/1/14 9,503.50 $116,503.30 

$171,066.99 

Accumulated Income 54,563.69 

Principal 116,503.30 

$171,066.99 



198 



LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS 

Administered by the Library Trustees 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1991 £22,465.44 

Receipts : 

Interest Income by Fund 

Codman Library Trust Fund 59.36 

Mary Jane Murray Farnsworth, 

& Murray P. Farnsworth Fund 117.22 
Alice Downing Hart & 



Olive Beatrice Floyd Fund 


70.67 




John H. Pierce Library Fund 


58.87 




George Russell Library Fund 


50.19 




Abbie J. Stearns Library Fund 


120.32 




George G. Tarbell Fund 


329.91 




Interest applied to amortize 


25.31 




C. Edgar Wheeler & 






Elizabeth S. wheeler Fund 


95.73 




George C. Tarbell & 






Eleanor F. Tarbell Fund 


723.32 




Lincoln Library Fund 


72.29 




Katherine S. Bolt Fund 


44.62 




John W. Carman & 






Eleanor Tarbell Carman Fund 


3,121.09 




Lucretia J. Hoover Fund 


209.10 




Herschbach Library Fund 


334.18 




Virginia S. Dillman Fund 


466.74 




Funds to Establish 






West Abrashkin Fund 


500.00 


6,398.92 


Securities Matured 




10,000.00 
$38,864.36 


ayments : 

To Librarian from J.H. Pierce - 






Library Fund 


59.73 




Purchase of Books and Tapes 


1,339.56 




Purchase Furniture 


6,081.43 




Purchase Securities 


10,269.99 




Accrued Interest 


158.38 




Transaction Fees 


33.62 


17,942.71 


Balance at June 30, 1992 




$20,921.65 



199 



LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1992 

Accumulated 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund Income Principal Total 

Codman Library Trust Fund 334.19 1,000.00 1,334.19 
Mary Jane Murray Farnsworth & 

Murray F. Farnsworth Fund 1,634.60 1,000.00 2,634.60 
Alice Downing Hart & 

Olive Beatrice Floyd Fund 489.66 1,000.00 1,489.66 

John H. Pierce Library Fund 58.87 0.00 58.87 

George Russell Library Fund 128.68 1,000.00 1,128.68 

Abbie J. Steams Library Fund 224.89 500.00 724.89 

George G. Tarbell Library Fund 693.87 2,000.00 2,693.87 
C. Edgar Wheeler & 

Elizabeth S. wheeler Fund 171.83 0.00 171.83 
George G. Tarbell & 

Eleanor F. Tarbell Fund 724.86 75.00 799.86 

*Lincoln Library Fund 373.85 0.00 373.85 

*Katherine S. Bolt Fund 734.37 0.00 734.37 
John W. Carman & 

Eleanor Tarbell Carman Fund 3,502.88 381.57 3,884.45 

Lucretia Jones Hoover Fund 221.69 203.13 424.82 

*Herschbach Library Fund 716.17 3,000.00 3,716.17 

Virginia S. Dillman Fund 229.67 21.87 251.54 

West Abrashkin Fund 500.00 

$10,240.08 $10,681.57 $20,921.65 



200 



LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS 

Securities Principal 

John H. Pierce Library Fund 
$1,000 So. NE Tel. Co. 5.75% 11/1/96 1,000.00 

Abbie J. Stearns Library Fund 
$1,000 U.S. Treasury 9.00% 2/15/94 1,000.00 

George G. Tarbell Library Fund 
$1,000 U.S. Treasury 8.625% 10/15/95 1,000.00 
$1,000 So. NE Tel. Co. 5.75% 11/1/96 1,000.00 
$1,000 U.S. Treasury 7.125% 10/15/98 1,000.00 

George G. & Eleanor F. Tarbell Fund 
$10,000 DuQuesne Light 7.00% l/l/99 9,925.00 

C. Edgar & Elizabeth S. Wheeler Fund 
$1,000 U.S. Treasury 9.00% 2/15/94 1,000.00 

*Lincoln Library Fund 
$1,000 So. NE Tel. Co. 5.75% 11/1/96 1,000.00 

John W. & Eleanor Tarbell Carman Fund 
$12,000 U.S. Treasury 7.00% 4/15/94 11,673.75 
$6,000 U.S. Treasury 10.125% 11/15/94 6,000.00 
$3,000 U.S. Treasury 8.625% 10/15/95 2,944.68 
$9,000 U.S. Treasury 6.875% 3/31/97 9,244.68 

*Herschbach Library Fund 
$2,000 U.S. Treasury 8.625% 8/15/94 2,000.00 

Lucretia J. Hoover Fund 
$2,000 U.S. Treasury 9.00% 11/15/93 1,996.87 

Virginia S. Dillman Fund 
$5,000 U.S. Treasury 8.875% 7/15/95 4,978.13 55,763.11 

$76,684.76 

Accumulated Income 10,484.76 

Principal 66,200.00 



* Un-restricted 



$76,684.76 



201 



NORMAN HAPGOOD FUND 
Administered by Roy Raja 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1991 62.59 

Receipts: 

Contributions 20.90 

Interest Income 3.77 

$87.26 

Payments: 

None 0.00 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1992 $87.26 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1992 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund $87.26 

Accumulated Income $87.26 

ALFRED CALLAHAN FUND 

Administered by the principal of Brooks School and the Brook 
School Eighth Grade Teaching Team 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1991 0.00 

Receipts: 

Funds to Establish * 3,015.93 

Payments : 

Purchase of Securities 3,022.50 

Ace. Interest 58.47 

3,080.97 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1992 -$65.04 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1992 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund -$65.04 

$3,000 U.S. Treasury 5.50% 02/15/95 3,022.50 

$2,957.46 

Accumulated Income -$58.47 

Principal 3,015.93 



202 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1992 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Abbott, John & Diana 
Abbott, Margaret & Walter 
Abedian, Behrouz & Nasrin 
Abele, Bradford & Rosemary 
Abrams, George S, Tr 
Abrams, Nancy 
Abrashkin , Diana 
Ackley, Wallace & Ethel 
Adams Family Trust 
Adams, F. Douglas & Patricia 
Adams, Frederick 0. 
Adams, George & Velda 
Adams, John/ Pat /Peter /Sharon 
Adams, Ramelle & Thomas 
Adams, Thomas B. 
Adelstein, Mary & James 
Adkins, Robert & Alison 
Adler, Harold & Ivy 
Adler, Ivy Ruth 
Agrawal, Subhash 
Alam, Umme Salma Momtaz 
Alexander, Rand & Cheryl 
Alfieris, Michael 
Allen, Robert & Carol 
Allen, Rosamond 
Allen, Ruth 
Allen, Stephen 
Allison, Caroline 
Allison, Geoffrey & Lesley 
Allison, John & Marion 
Althausen, Alex & Emily 
Altraan, R. & Nefussy, D. 
Ames III, Adelbert & Mary 
Ames, James & Suzannah 
Ammen, David & Judith 
Amoruso, Renee 
Anderson, Bruce & Dodie 
Anderson, Carl 
Anderson, David & Elaine 
Anderson, Lawrence & Rosina 
Anderson, Mildred 
Andley, Kaushal & Usha 
Andrews, Francis & Dorothy 
Angell, Craig & Carolyn 
Appleyard, Norman & Lillian 
Aprille, Thomas & Amelia 



413,200 


$ 5,239.38 


251,400 


3,187.75 


331,600 


4,204.69 


532,100 


6,747.03 


1,430,400 


18,137.47 


228,900 


2,902.45 


201,700 


2,557.56 


1,500 


19.02 


69,400 


879.99 


454,500 


5,763.06 


188,800 


2,393.98 


484,300 


6,140.92 


960,300 


12,176.60 


901,700 


11,433.54 


245,700 


3,115.48 


227,100 


2,879.63 


732,500 


9,288.10 


675,600 


8,566.61 


23,200 


294.18 


232,000 


2,941.76 


791,900 


10,041.29 


647,700 


8,212.84 


211,400 


2,680.55 


364,800 


4,625.66 


301,500 


3,823.02 


720,700 


9,138.48 


239,000 


3,030.52 


316,300 


4,010.68 


412,600 


5,231.77 


221,500 


2,808.62 


566,300 


7,180.68 


113,000 


1,432.84 


505,900 


6,414.81 


584,200 


7,407.66 


691,500 


8,768.22 


196,500 


2,491.62 


180,300 


2,286.20 


364,400 


4,620.59 


268,000 


3,398.24 


412,100 


5,225.43 


282,400 


3,580.83 


272,500 


3,455.30 


777,600 


9,859.97 


508,500 


6,447.78 


268,500 


3,404.58 


141,100 


1,789.15 



203 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1992 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Apsler, Robert & Jacquelin $ 431,900 $ 5,476.49 

Arcand, Eugene & Rita 919,800 11,663.06 

Arista, Miguel 264,000 3,347.52 

Armstrong Family 446,000 5,655.28 

Armstrong, Elayne 260,400 3,301.87 

Armstrong, John & Joanne 764,800 9,697.66 

Arnold, John & Lucy 316,600 4,014.49 

Arnold, Warren & Barbara 415,600 5,269.81 

Aronson, Richard & Jane 604,900 7,670.13 

Arshad, Gulrez & Sara 690,300 8,753.00 

Art, Robert & Suzanne 274,400 3,479.39 

Arthur, J & Young, Colin 673,300 8,537.44 

Asadorian, Alan & Melanie 396,600 5,028.89 

Asaff, Est. of Patricia 474,000 6,010.32 

Atchley Jr, Dana W. 624,800 7,922.47 

Atchley, Barbara P. 169,900 2,154.33 

Atkins, John & Jamie 289,000 3,664.52 

Atlas, S. & Wilkerson , R. 396,200 5,023.82 

Attanasio, Frank A. 267,800 3,395.70 

Austin, Richard & Marcia 443,300 5,621.04 

Avery, Abigail 401,100 5,085.95 

Avery, Albert & Barbara 174,300 2,210.12 

Ayer, Marilyn C. 211,200 2,678.02 

Azrack, Joseph & Abigail 974,600 12,357.93 



B H N Realty Trust 1,500 19.02 

Bachrach Jr, Alan 487,500 6,181.50 

Bagley, Patricia 770,500 9,769.94 

Baird, Gordon & Sarah 263,100 3,336.11 

Baldwin, Jacqueline 213,400 2,705.91 

Baldwin, Roger & Mary 414,900 5,260.93 

Balogh, Karoly & Judith 546,400 6,928.35 

Banerji, Julian & Laura 0. 363,800 4,612.98 

Banks, Jamie & Mark 362,500 4,596.50 

Bannon, Michael 105,700 1,340.28 

Barbarow, Ruth 162,900 2,065.57 

Barbiasz, Mary Ellen 114,200 1,448.06 

Bardsley, Theodore & Doris 292,300 3,706.36 

Bare, Bruce & Helen 406,100 5,149.35 

Bargmann, Joel & Carolyn 546,600 6,930.89 

Barkas, Christopher & Mary 299,600 3,798.93 

Barmakian, Frank & Norma 542,100 6,873.83 

Barnaby, John & Charlotte 221,400 2,807.35 

Barnes, Benjamin 456,600 5,789.69 

Barnet, James 496,900 6,300.69 



204 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1992 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Barrett, Beatrice $ 564,400 $ 7,156.59 

Barry, Jon & Barbara 518,800 6,578.38 

Barth, Jeffrey & Mary 1,189,100 15,077.79 

Bartovics, William & Susan 364,200 4,618.06 

Basile Family Trust 557,300 7,066.56 

Basile, Patrick & Judith 407,300 5,164.56 

Bassett, Kenneth 361,800 4,587.62 

Baybank Asset Management 268,200 3,400.78 

Beal Jr., Thomas & Barbara 768,300 9,742.04 

Beatty, Thomas & Sylvie 467,100 5,922.83 

Beenhouwer, Owen & Lillemor 463,100 5,872.11 

Behnke, James W. & Connie 440,900 5,590.61 

Belanger, Michael & Gisa 204,700 2,595.60 

Belitsky, Lee J. 232,000 2,941.76 

Bell, Roger & Barbara W. 308,400 3,910.51 

Belle, Gene 392,600 4,978.17 

Bemis Ann 252,200 3,197.90 

Benedetti, Maryann 167,400 2,122.63 

Bennett, Doris 300,800 3,814.14 

Benson, John & Kathryn A. 297,700 3,774.84 

Benson, Peter & Ann 198,400 2,515.71 

Bent ley Barbara 104,100 1,319.99 

Bentley, Joyce 474,700 6,019.20 

Bentley, Robert 246,800 3,129.42 

Benton, Stephen & Jeanne 349,000 4,425.32 

Berardino, Richard 130,800 1,658.54 

Bergen, Kenneth & Emily 772,900 9,800.37 

Bergen, Roger & Susan 599,500 7,601.66 

Berger, Ralph & Carol 395,700 5,017.48 

Berman, Diane & Cohen, Donald 383,300 4,860.24 

Bernard, Clark & Susana 687,300 8,714.96 

Bibring, George & Marcia 268,400 3,403.31 

Bickford, Helen & Scott 541,300 6,863.68 

Bienfang, Don & Denise 423,900 5,375.05 

Bikales, Norman & Ann 782,700 9,924.64 

Billings, Bruce & Fannie 97,100 1,231.23 

Billings, Despena & Thomas 395,600 5,016.21 

Billings, S. & Kennison, W. 75,900 962.41 

Birmingham, James & Carolyn 433,400 5,495.51 

Bishop, Robert & Sarah 472,500 5,991.30 

Bjork, Elizabeth 397,500 5,040.30 

Black, Stanley 183,600 2,328.05 

Black, Thomas 186,000 2,358.48 

Blackler, Peter & Lindsay 223,800 2,837.78 

Blanchard, Eileen 233,200 2,956.98 

Blatt, Thomas & Ann W. 307,400 3,897.83 



205 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1992 



Aggregate Value Real Estates 
Real Estate Tax 



Blood, Bernard & Diana 

Blood, David & Iva Dane 

Bloom, Laurence & Elaine 

Blumenthal, Arthur & Ina 

Bobbitt, Lake & Sarah 

Boccadoro, Joseph & Ida 

Bockoven, Dorothy, Tr 

Bogner, Walter 

Bolt, Richard & Katherine 

Bolton, Warren & Doris 

Bombara, Joseph J. Jr. 

Bond, Roger & Elizabeth 

Booth, Alice 

Booth, Robert 

Booth, Robert & William 

Boquist, Wallace 

Boruvka, John 

Boston Edison Co. 

Boudris, Edward & Mary M. 

Bower, Joseph & Nancy 

Bowers, Spotswood 

Bowles, Clifford 

Boyce, Manley 

Boyce, Manley & Karen 

Boyer, John & Margaret 

Boyer, Markley 

Boyle, Donald & Judith 

Boynton, Daniel & Janet 

Braasch, John & Nancy 

Braden, John & Dianne 

Bradford, Muriel 

Bradlee III, Henry & Sandra 

Bradley, Clifford & Jeannette 

Brain, J. Walter & Patricia 

Brand, Stephen & Blandyna W. 

Brandt, John & Marilyn 

Brannen, Barbara 

Braude, Stephen 

Braun, Esther 

Bray, Thomas & Linda Micu 

Brennan, Michael & Dorothy 

Brennan, William & Eleanor 

Brenninkmeyer , Maximiliaan 

Briggs, David & Elaine 

Briggs, Randall & Mary 

Brisson, Evelyn & Norman 



322,300 


$ 4,086.76 


264,300 


3,351.32 


295,300 


3,744.40 


705,200 


8,941.94 


298,700 


3,787.52 


49,800 


631.46 


304,000 


3,854.72 


419,900 


5,324.33 


624,800 


7,922.46 


35,100 


445.07 


189,500 


2,402.86 


293,700 


3,724.12 


48,400 


613.72 


657,000 


8,330.76 


38,700 


490.72 


898,100 


11,387.91 


100,400 


1,273.07 


172,900 


2,192.37 


546,100 


6,924.55 


609,800 


7,732.26 


279,400 


3,542.79 


473,600 


6,005.25 


195,000 


2,472.60 


427,000 


5,414.36 


429,900 


5,451.13 


853,600 


10,823.65 


197,900 


2,509.37 


209,500 


2,656.46 


627,300 


7,954.16 


565,700 


7,173.08 


259,600 


3,291.73 


543,100 


6,886.51 


205,900 


2,610.81 


199,700 


2,532.20 


264,500 


3,353.86 


474,900 


6,021.73 


624,400 


7,917.39 


610,000 


7,734.80 


464,500 


5,889.86 


646,500 


8,197.62 


278,400 


3,530.11 


285,500 


3,620.14 


519,300 


6,584.72 


517,600 


6,563.17 


411,200 


5,214.02 


324,500 


4,114.66 



206 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1992 





Aggregate Value 


Real Estate 




Real Estate 


Tax 


Brobeck, William 


$ 289,500 


$ 3,670.86 


Broderick, Ronald & Elizabeth 


14,400 


182.59 


Brodney, Myra 


536,000 


6,796.48 


Brogna, Mary 


638,200 


8,092.38 


Bronson, Franklin & Catherine 


300,900 


3,815.41 


Brooks Road Realty Trust 


440,100 


5,580.47 


3rooks , Paul 


543,700 


6,894.12 


Brooks, Rodney & Phanwadee 


353,400 


4,481.11 


Brower Tr., Howard 


680,100 


8,623.67 


Brown, Herbert & Theresa 


413,000 


5,236.84 


Brown, Jeffrey & Kathryn C 


719,700 


9,125.80 


Brown, Robert G & Donna 


230,400 


2,921.47 


Brown, Robert W & Lee 


203,500 


2,580.38 


Brown, Stephen & Susan 


571,200 


7,242.81 


Browne, Giles & Lorraine 


442,000 


5,604.56 


Brumme, Peter & Marie 


594,100 


7,533.19 


Bucci, Frank & Arlene 


423,300 


5,367.44 


Buchan, Barbara 


271,400 


3,441.35 


Bucholtz, Melvyn 


429,400 


5,444.79 


Buckler, Marilyn 


376,300 


4,771.48 


Buell, Lawrence & Phyllis 


411,600 


5,219.09 


Bunsai Gakuen Institute 


159,400 


2,021.19 


Buonopane, Paul & Mary 


307,400 


3,897.83 


Burckett, Douglas M. 


408,200 


5,175.98 


Burk, Prescott & Lucinda 


281,800 


3,573.22 


Burke Jr, Walter J., Tr. 


306,200 


3,882.62 


Burke, Roger 


544,000 


6,897.92 


Burke, Thomas & Kathleen 


674,000 


8,546.32 


Burnes, Jeannette 


278,200 


3,527.58 


Burnham, Robert & Elaine 


294,300 


3,731.72 


Burns, Christopher & Patricia 


942,100 


11,945.83 


Burns, Robert & E. Deborah 


219,700 


2,785.80 


Burt, William & Donna 


441,800 


5,602.02 


Butler, William & Nancy 


289,200 


3,667.06 


Buzney, Sheldon & Jane 


1,028,700 


13,043.92 


Bye, Willis & Angela 


617,000 


7,823.56 


Byrne, Brian & Julie 


1,321,300 


16,754.08 


Byrnes, Margaret 


587,100 


7,444.43 


Byron, Alan & Kathryn 


256,800 


3,256.22 


CTT Associates 


157,200 


1,993.30 


Cabot, Mary D G 


229,600 


2,911.33 


Cadete, Antonia 


188,300 


2,387.64 


Caldwell, Sarah 


557,100 


7,064.03 


Calitri, Leon & Mary 


226,600 


2,873.29 



207 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1992 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Campbell, Bruce $ 477,700 $ 6,057.24 

Campobasso, Richard & Lou Ann 308,400 3,910.51 

Campos-Garcia, German/ Judith 1,500 19.02 

Cancian, David & Mary 478,100 6,062.31 

Cannon, Bradford & Ellen 282,700 3,584.63 

Cannon, Robert & Betty 816,100 10,348.13 

Cannon, Walter B. & Irene 19,300 244.72 

Cantlin, Antoinette 490,400 6,218.28 

Cantlin, John 562,600 7,133.77 

Cantu, Robert 665,100 8,433.47 

Capizzi, Catherine 883,000 11,196.44 

Capone, Albert &Mary 273,200 3,464.18 

Cappucci, Thomas & Barbara 352,500 4,469.70 

Carano, Donald & Michael 561,200 7,116.02 

Caras, Byron & Anastasia 374,500 4,748.66 

Caras, Ophair & Florence 266,200 3,375.42 

Carbone, Dawn M. 103,900 1,317.45 

Carl Jr, Charles 304,800 3,864.86 

Carley, John & Joan 426,800 5,411.82 

Carlo, Peter & Cheryl 365,600 4,635.81 

Carman, Eleanor 211,400 2,680.55 

Carmen Development Corp. 3,413,300 43,280.64 

Carmen, William & Louise 357,800 4,536.90 

Caro, Jaime & Heidi H. 552,500 7,005.70 

Carr, Frederick & Susan 570,400 7,232.68 

Carroll, Richard & Elaine 219,500 2,783.26 

Carter, John 557,000 7,062.76 

Carter, Lewis & Beverly 643,900 8,164.65 

Caruso, Robert & Abbie 237,600 3,012.77 

Caskey, Anna 268,000 3,398.24 

Caskey, Walter 459,600 5,827.73 

Cassidy, Brian P, Tr. 158,500 2,009.78 

Caswell, Frederick & Pamela 481,900 6,110.49 

Caswell, John R. 494,900 6,275.33 

Cavallaro, Peter & Elizabeth 687,700 8,720.04 

Cechony, Gerald 265,700 3,369.08 

Cellucci, Daniel & Yolanda 714,600 9,061.12 

Cellucci, Elizabeth & Stephen 317,100 4,020.83 

Chaet, Robert & Joyce 211,200 2,678.02 

Chaiken, Jan & Marcia 352,500 4,469.70 

Chalilpoyil, Purush & Kerstin 265,300 3,364.00 

Champeny, John 156,400 1,983.16 

Champeny, John/ Lisa H. 358,400 4,544.51 

Champeny, Leona 690,500 8,755.54 

Champion, Craig & Teresa 603,200 7,648.58 

Chan, Catherine 386,900 4,905.89 



208 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1992 



Chan, Vincent & Agnes 

Chang, Chia Yung & Mei Lin 

Chao, Chung- Yao & Lifun Lin 

Chap in, Est. of Bertha 

Chapin, Margaret 

Charles I Real Estate Tr. 

Charrette, Edmond & Ann 

Chase, Irving H. , Tr. 

Chase, Rebecca, Est. of 

Cheek, Jack T. 

Cheever, Daniel & Abigail 

Chen , Eunice 

Chen, Sow-Hsin & Ching-Chih 

Cherniack, Jerome & Elizabeth 

Chin, Barbara J. 

Chiotelis, Charles & Iasme 

Chipman, Mary 

Chisholm, Edward & Margaret 

Chmielinski , Tsun Ming/Robert 

Cholawsky, E. & Dutt, J. 

Chopra, Deepak & Rita 

Chou, Harry & Lily 

Christensen, Ronald 

Chu, Chauncy & Margaret 

Chu, Ge Yao & Wei Ying 

Chu, Irene H. 

Chu, Nelson & Tomoko 

Chucker, Susan 

Church, Robert & Priscilla 

Churchill, Richard & Maria 

Ciampa, V. /Sullivan, J. 

Ciampi, Mary 

Ciaramaglia , Frederick/Marcia 

Ciraso, Anne, Jennie & John 

Clark, David & Phyllis H. 

Clark, Sandra B 

Clarke, James 

Coan, Thomas & Catherine 

Coane, Amolia, Est. of 

Coffin, Stewart 

Cohen, Jacques 

Cole, Addison & Ann B 

Cole, Edwin & Lucy 

Coleman, George & Kathleen 

Collins, Donald & Susan 

Collins, Laurence & Janet 



Aggregate Value 


Real Estate 


Real Estate 


Tax 


$ 516,300 


$ 6,546.68 


168,100 


2,131.51 


308,600 


3,913.05 


944,200 


11,972.45 


300,200 


3,806.54 


7,300 


92.56 


452,800 


5,741.50 


595,200 


7,547.14 


184,700 


2,342.00 


200,600 


2,543.61 


381,700 


4,839.96 


329,500 


4,178.06 


99,100 


1,256.59 


294,600 


3,735.53 


212,100 


2,689.43 


443,000 


5,617.24 


240,500 


3,049.54 


272,500 


3,455.30 


302,200 


3,831.90 


245,300 


3,110.40 


769,800 


9,761.06 


458,100 


5,808.71 


487,900 


6,186.57 


438,900 


5,565.25 


521,300 


6,610.08 


377,800 


4,790.50 


376,600 


4,775.29 


130,800 


1,658.54 


493,700 


6,260.12 


1,308,700 


16,594.32 


176,200 


2,234.22 


310,300 


3,934.60 


443,600 


5,624.85 


401,500 


5,091.02 


266,300 


3,376.68 


332,200 


4,212.30 


270,600 


3,431.21 


211,300 


2,679.28 


220,400 


2,794.67 


292,600 


3,710.17 


295,600 


3,748.21 


269,800 


3,421.06 


410,000 


5,198.80 


416,400 


5,279.95 


504,600 


6,398.33 


381,100 


4,832.35 



209 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1992 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Com jean, Marc & Judith $ 412,800 $ 5,234.30 

Comjean, Marlies 577,200 7,318.90 

Como, Florence 265,100 3,361.47 

Comstock, Charles 239,000 3,030.52 

Corns tock, Joan 443,700 5,626.12 

Cone Jr, Thomas & Barbara 405,200 5,137.94 

Connolly, Joseph & Catherine 294,500 3,734.26 

Conrad, Peter & Ylisabyth 438,800 5,563.98 

Constable, William 282,100 3,577.03 

Constant ine, Katherine 285,300 3,617.60 

Cook, John & Caroline 383,300 4,860.24 

Cook, Jr, Paul & Marion 450,500 5,712.34 

Coolidge, Henry & Alice 592,600 7,514.17 

Coombs, Dana & Malene 390,000 4,945.20 

Coons, Nancy & Thomas, Peter 462,300 5,861.96 

Cooper, E Crawley & Jane 397,200 5,036.50 

Cooper, Lorna 464,500 5,889.86 

Cooper, T. /Guilford Const. 314,000 3,981.52 

Cope, Ruth S. 311,100 3,944.75 

Copeland, Charles & Muriel 295,800 3,750.74 

Corcoran, Robert & Elizabeth 424,700 5,385.20 

Corio, Carol 188,300 2,387.64 

Cormack, Barbara 161,600 2,049.09 

Cort, Clifford & Carey 646,600 8,196.89 

Cotoia, Anthony & Lucy 427,200 5,416.90 

Cotoia, Anthony & Lucy, Trs 255,100 3,234.66 

Cotoia, Lucy 422,500 5,357.30 

Cotoni, Arthur & Penelope 335,900 4,259.21 

Cotoni, Joseph 305,100 3,868.67 

Cotton, Michael & Diane 668,500 8,476.58 

Cousins, Est. Lawrence/ Jeanne 297,900 3,777.37 

Cowles, Alexandra C. 287,400 3,644.23 

Cowperthwaite , Jacqueline A. 503,800 6,388.18 

Crafts, Frederic A, Tr. 225,500 2,859.34 

Craig Jr, Stanley & Susan 537,700 6,818.04 

Craig, Robert & Amy 330,500 4,190.74 

Cranberry Hill Associates 7,099,700 90,024.19 

Crandall, Stephen & Patricia 532,000 6,745.76 

Crawford, Hugh 208,800 2,647.58 

Crawford, John & Joanna 491,300 6,229.68 

Creighton, Alexander/ Elizabeth 301 ,400 3 , 821 . 75 

Cretella, Henry & Ruth 571,300 7,244.08 

Critch, William & Dorina L. 497,100 6,303.23 

Crockett, Katherine 1,200 15.22 

Crosby, Douglas & Laura 447,200 5,670.49 

Crosby, Gregory & Anne 568,800 7,212.38 



210 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1992 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Crowe, Mary 

Crowther, William & Nancy 
Csimma, Zoltan & Cristina 
Cucchinotta, N. & Ribeiro, J. 
Culver, Perry & Kate 
Cummings, William & Palma 
Cunningham, J Lewis & Ruth 
Cunningham, James 
Cunningham, Jonathan C. 
Cunningham, Robert M & Claire 
Curren, Thomas & Susan 
Curtiss, Robert & Dorothy 



DJR Nomine Trust 

Dallos, Andras & Zsuzsanna 

Damico Jr, Ralph & Edwina 

Damico, Ralph & Elvira 

Damon, J Gilbert & Priscilla 

Damon, Nancy 

Dane ona , I lana 

Daniels, Bruce & Janet 

Daniels, Grover & Starr 

Danna, Mario 

Darling Jr, Eugene 

Darling, Leonard & Barbara 

Darman, Richard 

Darrigo Brothers Co. 

Dautremont, Chester & Ruth 

Dautremont, Ruth 

Davies, Claire Nelson 

Davis, Ronald & Barbara 

Davis, Sherman 

Davis, Sherman & Phyllis 

Da vol i, Robert E & Eileen 

Dawes, Donald & Ruth 

De La Pena, Miguel & Irma 

Dean, Maybelle L. 

Dean, Robert & Denise 

Dean, William & Lorraine 

Debaryshe, Paul & Louise 

Decisneros, Maria 

Deck, Mark & Patricia 

Deguglielmo, Florence 

Dejesus, Paul & Eileen 

Delia, John & Maria 



1 539,300 


$ 6,838.32 


485,300 


6,153.60 


755,900 


9,584.81 


218,600 


2,771.85 


781,500 


9,909.42 


292,900 


3,713.97 


347,600 


4,407.57 


311,500 


3,949.82 


425,800 


5,399.14 


232,000 


2,941.76 


258,500 


3,277.78 


265,400 


3,365.27 


1,041,800 


13,210.02 


270,000 


3,423.60 


270,700 


3,432.48 


860,800 


10,914.95 


322,400 


4,088.03 


599,400 


7,600.39 


126,900 


1,609.09 


658,000 


8,343.44 


566,500 


7,183.22 


155,400 


1,970.47 


377,600 


4,787.97 


578,600 


7,336.65 


271,300 


3,440.08 


162,200 


2,056.69 


764,800 


9,697.66 


376,000 


4,767.68 


303,300 


3,845.84 


360,100 


4,566.07 


607,200 


7,699.30 


874,200 


11,084.87 


193,600 


2,454.85 


383,200 


4,858.98 


369,200 


4,681.46 


5,300 


67.20 


205,300 


2,603.20 


295,500 


3,746.94 


294,200 


3,730.46 


268,000 


3,398.24 


532,100 


6,747.03 


1,500 


19.02 


416,400 


5,279.95 


445,600 


5,650.21 



211 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1992 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



DellaCamera-MacClary, Debra $ 578,700 $ 7,337.92 

Delori, Francois & Rosamond 625,300 7,928.80 

Denehy, Bernadetta 446,900 5,666.69 

Denehy, Edward 357,800 4,536.90 

Denholm Family Nomine Trust 606,000 7,684.08 

Denormandie Farms Trust 597*000 7,569.96 

Denormandie, Alice 719,100 9,118.19 

Denormandie, Eliana 521,800 6,616.43 

Denormandie, Philip/ Ernestine 24,500 310.66 

Denormandie, Thomas, K & V 1,344,400 17,047.00 

Dermenjian, Charles 180,900 2,293.81 

Desai, Samir & Nilima 734,900 9,318.53 

Desantis, Joseph & Sheryl S. 285,200 3,616.34 

Descognets, Gwendolyn 552,600 7,006.97 

Deterling Jr, Ralph & Mary 532,600 6,753.37 

Detwiler, Phyllis 394,200 4,998.46 

Dewey, E.S. 573,000 7,265.64 

Dewey, Edward & Zella 405,000 5,135.40 

Dewey, Laurie T. 612,400 7,765.23 

Dexter, Barbara 486,800 6,172.62 

Diab, Thomas 826,400 10,478.75 

Diadiuk, Vicky 317,400 4,024.63 

Diarbakerly, Mark & Regina 371,700 4,713.16 

Dickie, Richard & Julia 267,800 3,395.70 

Diebboll, Robert & Kim 171,600 2,175.89 

Dieterich, Richard & Beverly 400,200 5,074.54 

Digiovanni, Guy & Teresa 391,600 4,965.49 

Dilg, Giles & Maureen 347,100 4,401.23 

Dillman, Douglas & Virginia 224,300 2,844.12 

Dimancescu, Dan & Katherine 529,800 6,717.86 

Dinerstein, Gordon 284,100 3,602.39 

Dixon, George & Christine 480,500 6,092.74 

Dixon, Russell & Theresa 304,800 3,864.86 

Doherty, William & Phyllis 592,100 7,507.83 

Dohertys Garage Inc 558,600 7,083.05 

Dolan, Charles & Joanne 865,800 10,978.34 

Dolbec, Richard & Elaine 185,900 2,357.21 

Dolinsky, Larry & Joan 203,600 2,581.65 

Domenichella, Domenic 152,700 1,936.24 

Domenichella, Frank Jr. 62,100 787.43 

Donald, Aida 522,700 6,627.84 

Donald, David & Aida 484,500 6,143.46 

Donaldson, Alan 266,900 3,384.29 

Donaldson, Astrid 436,100 5,529.75 

Donaldson, David & Lynn 1,047,700 13,284.84 

Donaldson, Donald 1,100 13.95 



212 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1992 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Donaldson, Elizabeth $ 457,000 $ 5,794.76 

Donaldson, Jonathan & Nancy 686,800 8,708.62 

Donaldson, Magruder/ Jennifer 460,900 5,844.21 

Donaldson, Malcolm 785,600 9,961.41 

Donnell, Marion, Tr. 441,800 5,602.02 

Donovan, Andrew 530,100 6,721.67 

Donovan, Donna 290,300 3,681.00 

Dooley, Thomas & Helen 734,900 9,318.54 

Dougherty, Allen & Helen 225,200 2,855.54 

Doughty, Joseph 218,800 2,774.38 

Douglas, Linda 228,600 2,898.65 

Downey Jr, Edward /Elizabeth 283,600 3,596.05 

Downing, Daniel & Linda L 277,200 3,514.90 

Downs, Gerald & Elaine 321,200 4,199.62 

Dowse, Amy 498,900 6,326.05 

Drago, Nicholas & Sara 457,100 5,796.03 

Drane, Douglas 892,900 11,321.97 

Drew, Frederic & Shirley 188,300 2,387.64 

Drew, John R. 100,400 1,273.07 

Driscoll, Daniel & Constance 514,100 6,518.79 

Dubin, Steven & Merrie L 415,600 5,269.81 

Dubois, Olive 237,200 3,007.70 

Duborg, George 430,700 5,461.28 

Dumaine, Deborah E. 376,200 4,770.22 

Dunlap, Arthur 160,000 2,028.80 

Dunn, Barbara & Thomas 269,200 3,413.46 

Dupont, Emile 757,700 9,607.64 

Durso, Nicholas 223,500 2,833.98 

Dust in, Rachel 322,200 4,085.50 



Eaton, Jefferson 248,500 3,150.98 

Eckhardt, Homer 342,100 4,337.83 

Eckhardt, William & Carolyn 313,500 3,975.18 

Edes, Francis & Martha 271,600 3,443.89 

Edlund, Campbell 316,600 4,014.49 

Egendorf , Andrew & Linda 1,128,100 14,304.31 

Elias, Daniel & Karen K 315,200 3,996.74 

Elkus, Howard & Lorna 462,100 5,859.43 

Elliott, Melody 319,000 4,044.92 

Elliott, Peggy 561,700 7,122.36 

Ellis, Est. Alexander & Nancy 810,000 10,270.80 

Ellison, George & Clare 766,300 9,716.68 

Ells, Stephen 164,400 2,084.59 

Elwood, David & Carol 320,000 4,057.60 

Emery, Alice 377,800 4,790.50 



213 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1992 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Emmons, Judith 
England, Albert & Priscilla 
England, Daniel & Joann 
Eppling, Frederic & Sarah 
Epstein, Arnold & Patricia 
Eschenroeder, Alan & Laura 
Eshleman , Dean 
Etcheverry, Nicholas 
Evangelista, Florenzo/Dorothy 
Explorer Development Corp. 



F D I C 

Faddoul, George & Natalie 

Fairbanks, Alan & Diane 

Falender, Andrew 

Faneuil Hall Flower Mkt. 

Faran, James 

Fargo, Susan C. 

Farny, Michael 

Farny, Michael & Ethel 

Farrell, Philip & Ruth 

Farrokh-Pars , Homayoon 

Fehr, David & Karen M. 

Feinberg, Neil 

Felegian, Peter & Marion 

Felix, James 

Feni jn , Yvonne 

Fenton, Terence & Cynthia 

Fernald Jr, George & Eleanor 

Ferri, Edward & Eleanor 

Ferro, Armand & Jacqueline 

Fink, James & Anny 

Finkelstein, Stan & Jill B. 

Finnegan, Lawrence 

Finnerty, James & Anna 

Finnerty, Richard & Wendy 

Finucane, Ann 

First Atlantic Properties 

Fiscale, Joseph & Rosanna 

Fisher, Madge K. 

Fitts (Todd), Gertrude 

Fitzgerald, Derek & Eleanor 

Fitzgerald, John & Thelma 

Fitzgerald, Michael/Kathleen 

Flannery, Constance 



477,600 


$ 6,055.97 


591,900 


7,505.30 


653,200 


8,282.58 


261,700 


3,318.36 


437,100 


5,542.43 


498,500 


6,320.98 


210,700 


2,671.68 


511,500 


6,485.82 


242,000 


3,068.56 


314,000 


3,981.52 


,568,500 


32,568.58 


318,500 


4,038.58 


1,500 


19.02 


439,900 


5,577.93 


424,700 


5,385.20 


546,400 


6,928.35 


525,400 


6,662.07 


420,300 


5,329.40 


296,100 


3,754.55 


342,900 


4,347.97 


262,300 


3,325.96 


535,100 


6,785.07 


371,000 


4,704.28 


311,900 


3,954.89 


310,200 


3,933.34 


373,800 


4,739.78 


222,200 


2,817.50 


712,200 


9,030.70 


337,700 


4,282.04 


268,700 


3,407.12 


574,200 


7,280.86 


372,300 


4,720.76 


117,400 


1,488.63 


292,500 


3,708.90 


441,400 


5,596.95 


690,800 


8,759.34 


445,600 


5,650.21 


339,000 


4,298.52 


403,300 


5,113.84 


539,900 


6,845.93 


242,000 


3,068.56 


339,200 


4,301.06 


956,700 


12,130.96 


424,600 


5,383.93 



214 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1992 





Aggregate Value 


Real Estate 




Real Estate 


Tax 


Flannery, Donald Jr & Mi t tie 


$ 228,200 


$ 2,893.58 


Flans burgh, Earl & Louise 


504,900 


6,402.13 


Flint Jr., Warren & Margaret 


520,200 


6,596.14 


Flint Realty Trust 


207,000 


2,624.76 


Flint, Edward & Henry 


419,900 


5,324.33 


Flint, Ephraim 


16,200 


205.42 


Flint, Eugenia 


272,100 


3,450.23 


Flint, George & Lucie 


310,800 


3,940.94 


Flint, Jonathan & Alice 


436,100 


5,529.75 


Flint, Margaret S. 


357,400 


4,531.83 


Flint, Peter & Janet 


303,600 


3,849.65 


Flory, Elizabeth A. 


213,300 


2,704.64 


Flummerfelt, J Kent & Jane 


645,500 


8,184.94 


Flynn, William & Therese 


380,300 


4,822.20 


Fogg, Stephen, Tr 


280,100 


3,551.67 


Foley, John & Lori 


297,900 


3,777.37 


Forbes, John 


176,100 


2,232.95 


Ford II, David & Mary 


696,800 


8,835.42 


Fortunato, Frank & Joan 


197,900 


2,509.37 


Foster, Gerald & Candace 


361,300 


4,581.28 


Foster, J Edward & Sara 


395,500 


5,014.94 


Francis, Henry & Phoebe 


285,000 


3,613.80 


Frank, Robert & Velma 


616,900 


7,822.29 


Franks ton, Michael & Meredith 


433,200 


5,492.98 


Fraser, Donald & Joanne 


488,600 


6,195.45 


Fraser, Robert & Donna 


280,400 


3,555.47 


Frazier, Michael & Janet 


203,800 


2,584.18 


Freed, Charles & Florence 


494,200 


6,266.46 


French, John & Deborah 


647,200 


8,206.50 


Freud, Sophie 


459,900 


5,831.53 


Friedman E. & Cohen J. 


886,700 


11,243.36 


Frost, Rainer & Martha 


407,300 


5,164.56 


Frost, Wesley & October 


351,600 


4,458.29 


Fulford, Marion 


166,600 


2,112.49 


Funaro, Katherine J. 


573,500 


7,271.98 


Fusillo, Concetta 


530,000 


6,720.40 


Gable, Bruce & Dawn 


295,800 


3,750.74 


Gabovitch, Annette 


298,800 


3,788.78 


Gailey, Timothy & Mary 


365,800 


4,638.34 


Gallup, William & Pamela R. 


237,600 


3,012.77 


Gannett, Ann 


636,900 


8,075.89 


Ganz, Susan & Bryan 


714,500 


9,059.86 


Gardent Jr, Paul & Harriet 


271,400 


3,441.35 


Gargill, Lynn 


262,100 


3,323.43 



215 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1992 





Aggregate Value 


Real Estate* 




Real Estate 


Tax 


Gargill, Robert 


$1,174,000 


$14,886.32 


Garmory,G. & Drake, G. 


228,400 


2,896.11 


Garner, Robert & Kathleen 


233,400 


2,959.51 


Garrison, David & Alice 


367,200 


4,656.10 


Garrison, John 


504,600 


6,398.33 


Garth, John & Nancy 


297,600 


3,773.57 


Gary, Maida 


308,700 


3,914.32 


Gatchell Jr, G Gordon/Esther 


275,900 


3,498.41 I 


Gauvin, Gregory & Mary 


349,400 


4,430.39 


Gay ley, Mary 


422,100 


5,352.23 


Gechijian, Ara & Nancy 


5,400 


68.47 ] 


Gechter, Jerry & Anne 


178,400 


2,262.11 1 


Geer, Charles 


937,500 


11,887.50 


Gefter, Malcolm L. 


708,100 


8,978.71 j 


Gentile, Kathleen P. 


241,000 


3,055.88 ; 


Georges, George & Kim C. 


342,700 


4,345.44 


Gergacz, David & Teresa 


978,800 


12,411.18 


Gerson, Nathaniel & Sareen 


368,100 


4,667.51 


Gerstein, Deborah A. 


259,400 


3,289.19 ! 


Gertz, Dwight & Virginia W. 


365,100 


4,629.47 i 
3,012.77 j 
3,438.82 J 


Gervais, Maurice & Francoise 


237,600 


Gheith, Dorothy 


271,200 


Gienapp, William & Erica 


483,300 


6,128.24 


Giese, Paul & Lucretia 


371,700 


4,713.16 


Gilford Construction, Inc. 


266,100 


3,374.15 


Gillis, John & Marsha 


528,400 


6,700.11 


Gimbel, Katherine 


275,200 


3,489.53 S 


Giurleo, James & Mary 


33,200 


420.98 ! 


Glanz, Marcy 


560,500 


7,107.14 


Glass, John & Florence 


333,800 


4,232.58 


Glendon, Richard & Diana 


220,500 


2,795.94 


Goddard, Richard & Karen 


230,300 


2,920.20 


Goldbaum, Michael & Wanda 


351,200 


4,453.22 


Golden, Sylvia 


426,600 


5,409.29 j 


Goldstein, Joel 


197,900 


2,509.37 


Goodrich, John & Susan 


450,500 


5,712.34 


Goodspeed, Jacqueline 


286,000 


3,626.48 


Goodwin, Margaret M. 


96,800 


1,227.42 


Goodwin, Susan M. 


105,700 


1,340.28 


Gordon, Allen/Gilman, Terri 


263,100 


3,336.11 i 


Gordon, Doris 


659,400 


8,361.19 


Gordon, Lester & Dafna 


384,700 


4,878.00 


Grabill, Martha 


246,600 


3,126.89 | 


Graddis , Richard 


12,200 


154.70 


Graf, Jeannette 


253,000 


3,208.04 i 


Graham, Cynthia 


119,900 


1,520.33 ! 



216 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1992 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



(Graham, Jack & Norma 

JGrason, Edna 

(Gray, George & Ellen 

jGray, Leslie & Jessie 

Gray, Patricia & Stephen 

Greaves, Allan & Theresa 

JGreco, C. & Young, K. 

iGreeley, James & Bernice 

jGreen, David H. 

Green, Jerry & Pamela 

iGreen, Laurence & Margot 

J Green, Myra 

jGreen, Robert T. & Catherine 

Green, Robert V. & Therese 

JGreenberg, Sandra 

|Greenberger, Joel & Catherine 

| Greene, Catherine R. 

iGreeson, Joseph & Jennie 

iGreetham, Douglas & Noreen 

jGrieman, Eric & Brenda 

> Griggs, Annette & Thomas 

Grim Jr. , William & Barbara 

Grimanis, Michael & Mary 

[Grindlay, Jonathan & Sandra 

Grinnell, Virginia _ 

Grinnen, Lewis 

Gross, Gerald & Cindy 

Gross, Thomas & Judith 

Grossman, Randy & Mary Scott 

Grover C. Stuart & Gunilda 

Groves, Allan & Camille 

Guarino, Guy & Frances 

Guldberg, Peter & Alexandra 

Gummere, John 

Gundy, Jennifer & Walter 

Gundy, William & Malora 

Gus, Wendy E. 

Gustafson, J Kenneth & Janet 

Gustavson, Glenn & Patricia M 

Guthke, Karl & Dagmar 

Guy, Cynthia 

Gyftopoulos, Elias & Artemis 



H. B. Knowles, Inc. 
Haartz, Beatrice(Mrs. Page) 



542,100 


$ 6,873.83 


378,200 


4,795.58 


520,200 


6,596.14 


551,300 


6,990.48 


592,800 


7,516.70 


265,200 


3,362.74 


593,400 


7,524.31 


352,800 


4,473.50 


551,000 


6,986.68 


614,600 


7,793.13 


331,600 


4,204.69 


766,800 


9,723.02 


651,400 


8,259.75 


511,600 


6,487.09 


310,000 


3,930.80 


689,900 


8,747.93 


230,800 


2,926.54 


641,800 


8,138.02 


308,200 


3,907.98 


105,700 


1,340.28 


456,200 


5,784.62 


294,800 


3,738.06 


1,500 


19.02 


607,700 


7,705.64 


385,100 


4,883.07 


597,200 


7,572.50 


188,900 


2,395.25 


376,200 


4,770.22 


232,600 


2,949.37 


368,300 


4,670.04 


360,500 


4,571.14 


549,000 


6,961.32 


702,800 


8,911.50 


537,800 


6,819.30 


268,600 


3,405.85 


690,000 


8,749.20 


107,200 


1,359.30 


301,300 


3,820.48 


508,000 


6,441.44 


418,200 


5,302.78 


499,300 


6,331.12 


791,100 


10,031.15 


420,300 


5,329.40 


449,400 


5,698.39 



217 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1992 



Susan 
Betsey 

& Esther 
& Barbara 
Nancy 



Haber, Stuart & Ellen M. 

Hachiklan, Kenneth & Gloria 

Hadley, Henry & Janna 

Hadlock, Charles & Joanne 

Haessler, Diane 

Haggerty, John & Mary Jo 

Haggerty, Nancy 

Hagmann, Otto & Katherine 

Hales, Charles & Mary Ann 

Hall III, Andrew 

Halls tein, Harold & 

Halpern, Nicholas & 

Halpin, Patricia 

Hamilton, William H 

Hamilton, William L 

Hammond III, John & 

Hanania, Barbara 

Hani on, Mary G. 

Hansen, C Russel & Pamela 

Hansen, Kent 

Hanson, Adler & Madeline 

Hapgood Jr, Norman & Ruth 

Harding, David & Jan N. 

Harding, Douglas & Susan 

Harding , Sheila 

Hargreaves-Heald, Geoffrey & Brooke 

Haroian, Henry & Jessie 

Harrington Jr, Cliff ord/et al 

Harrington, Nancy (Ms.Forg) 

Harrington, Winthrop & Andrea 

Harris, Eric & Susan B. 

Harris, Melvyn & Nancy 

Harris, Roger & Evelyn 

Harrison, E. /Phillips, D. 

Harrison, Henry & Elizabeth 

Harvey, Frank & Adele 

Hatsopoulos Realty Trust 

Hatsopoulos, George & Daphne 

Hatsopoulos, John & Patricia 

Hawes, Donald & Lillian 

Hawkes, Gregory & Elaine 

Hay, Pamela & Richard 

Haydock, Gale/Freeman, Mason 

Hayes, Oliver & Paula 

Hayes, Wilson & Dana W. 

Hays, Timothy & Pamela 



Aggregate Value 


Real Estate 


Real Estate 


Tax 


$ 460,300 


$ 5,836.60 


517,900 


6,566.97 


491,800 


6,236.02 


496,300 


6,293.08 


505,900 


6,414.81 


452,500 


5,737.70 


230,100 


2,917.67 


495,700 


6,285.49 


542,500 


6,878.90 


522,900 


6,630.37 


199,700 


2,532.20 


430,600 


5,460.01 


115,600 


1,465.81 


400,900 


5,083.41 


359,400 


4,554.66 


604,100 


7,659.99 


206,600 


2,619.69 


269,300 


3,414.72 


511,000 


6,479.48 


692,900 


8,785.97 


365,200 


4,630.74 


375,000 


4,755.00 


543,200 


6,887.78 


366,100 


4,642.15 


166,500 


2,111.22 


508,500 


6,447.78 


312,800 


3,966.30 


51,700 


655.56 


16,200 


205.42 


1,002,100 


12,706.62 


489,700 


6,209.40 


508,500 


6,447.78 


298,400 


3,783.71 


423,600 


5,371.25 


888,400 


11,264.91 


592,700 


7,515.44 


516,600 


6,550.48 


880,400 


11,163.47 


1,013,800 


12,854.98 


364,500 


4,621.86 


554,200 


7,027.26 


415,900 


5,273.61 


519,200 


6,583.46 


317,300 


4,023.36 


489,300 


6,204.32 


395,300 


5,012.40 



218 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1992 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Healey, Jeanne C. 
Healthcare Property Investor 
Healy, Edward & Helen 
Heart, Frank & Jane 
Hecht, Norman & Mary 
Heck, Stanley & Mary 
Heckscher, Charles & Lavinla 
Heijn Jr, Cornelius & Marion 
Heinrich, Paul 
Heller, Thomas & Ann Cz 
Hellmuth, Joseph & Regina 
Henderson, James 
Henderson, Robert 
Hendrickson, Robert & Ruth 
Hensley, Kevin & Melissa 
Herlacher, Larry & Jane 
Herman, Peter & Mary 
Hersch, Charles & Phyllis 
Herschbach, Dudley & Georgene 
Herthel, Evelyn 
Hester, Leon 

Hewitt, Elizabeth & George 
Hibben, George 
Hickok, Jonathan & Debra 
Hicks, Robert & Sarah 
Hieronymus, William & Ramelle 
Hill, Craig & Heather 
Hill, John, Tr 
Himawan, Jeff & Susyrati B. 
Hinds, Edward & Edith 
Hingston, Joseph & Gloria 
Hoar, Norman & Shirley 
Hoben, Allan & Susan 
Hoch, Alfred 
Hoch, Reimar 

Hodgson, Nicholas & Melissa 
Hoff , Charles & Josephine 
Hoffman, Steven & Jeanine 
Hogan, James & Mary Jane 
Holberton, Philip & Anne 
Holbrook, George & Sarah 
Holden, Lawrence T & Sarah 
Holden, Sarah C. 
Holland, Peter & Marjorie 
Holland, Taffy 
Hollingsworth, Florence 



211,200 


$ 2,678.02 


1,500 


19.02 


341,100 


4,325.15 


401,700 


5,093.56 


405,800 


5,145.54 


1,094,100 


13,873.19 


306,200 


3,882.62 


268,300 


3,402.04 


319,200 


4,047.46 


428,100 


5,428.31 


353,900 


4,487.45 


338,300 


4,289.64 


226,700 


2,874.56 


253,300 


3,211.84 


193,800 


2,457.38 


552,200 


7,001.90 


210,000 


2,662.80 


356,600 


4,521.69 


390,400 


4,950.27 


568,500 


7,208.58 


491,000 


6,225.88 


433,600 


5,498.05 


584,100 


7,406.39 


343,900 


4,360.65 


249,900 


3,168.73 


517,100 


6,556.83 


576,300 


7,307.48 


170,600 


2,163.21 


295,300 


3,744.40 


702,500 


8,907.70 


257,300 


3,262.56 


357,900 


,4,538.17 


307,900 


3,904.17 


222,500 


2,821.30 


238,400 


3,022.91 


775,500 


9,833.34 


623,300 


7,903.44 


734,800 


9,317.26 


113,000 


1,432.84 


527,100 


6,683.63 


116,100 


1,472.15 


233,400 


2,959.51 


993,900 


12,602.65 


296,500 


3,759.62 


453,100 


5,745.31 


533,400 


6,763.51 



219 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1992 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Holllster, Walter & Sally $ 361,700 $ 4,586.36 

Hoover, H./Giese L. /Norman E. 402,200 5,099.90 

Hopengarten, Fredric & Betty 352,900 4,474.77 

Hopkins, Mark & Margaret Y. 407,900 5,172.17 

Hopkins, Robert & Mary 371,600 4,711.89 

Hopland, Jan & Barbara 665,800 8,442.34 

Home, Benjamin & Jean 461,000 5,845.48 

Horwitz, Patricia F. 478,200 6,063.58 

Houghton, Lillian 120,000 1,521.60 

Houtzeel, Stephanie 282,800 3,585.90 

Hoversten, Barbara 323,500 4,101.98 

Howard, Joseph & Sally 478,400 6,066.11 

Howland, Weston & Susanah 1,038,100 13,163.10 

Hsiao, Chia-Chuan & Hwa-Ying 291,700 3,698.76 

Hsu, Cheng-Pei & Maggie 253,500 3,214.38 

Hsu, Michael & Dora 616,600 7,818.49 

Huang, Tai-San & Fu-Mei 397,000 5,033.96 

Hubbard, Eliot 561,700 7,122.36 

Hubbard, Jason & Frederique 587,000 7,443.16 

Hubbard, Jonathan & Ann 327,400 4,151.43 

Huff, William C. & Ann 737,600 9,352.77 

Hull, Kenneth & Sandra W. 311,200 3,946.02 

Humez, Alice D 260,400 3,301.87 

Hunsaker Land Corp. Inc 30,000 380.40 

Hunsaker, Jerome 796,100 10,094.55 

Hunt, Daniel & Joan 941,400 11,936.95 

Hunter, David/Trucksis, M. 188,300 2,387.64 

Hunter, William & Suzanne 345,300 4,378.40 

Hunter, William, Tr. 690,100 8,750.47 

Hurd, Kenneth 186,000 2,358.48 

Hurd, Kenneth a Pamela 356,500 4,520.42 

Hurff, Joseph & Elizabeth 329,900 4,183.13 



Ide, Kenton & Christel 295,800 3,750.74 

Iliescu, Nicholas & Esther 357,900 4,538.17 

Immel, Stephen & Peggy 363,200 4,605.38 

Ingard, Sven Erik 428,900 5,438.45 

Ireland, David & Diana 591,500 7,500.22 

Irwin, Mary 604,400 7,663.79 

Ives, Katherine C. 546,000 6,923.28 

Ivy Realty Trust 1,210,100 15,344.07 



Jackson Jr, Gardner & Sallie 356,600 4,521.69 

Jackson, Huson & Polly 590,500 7,487.54 



220 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1992 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Jacobs, David & Louise $ 506,200 $ 6,418.62 

Jacobs, Richard & Ilene 819,000 10,384.92 

Jacquet, Ernest & Madeline 642,900 8,151.97 

Jahrling, Robert & Catherine 406,000 5,148.08 

James, Hamilton & Waleska 677,700 8,593.24 

Janes, G. Sargent & Ann 368,200 4,668.78 

Jarvis, John & Elaine 502,400 6,370.43 

Jenal, Robert & Irene 553,800 7,022.18 

Jerodel Realty Trust 1,127,200 14,292.90 

Jevon, Robert & Virginia 392,600 4,978.17 

Jewett, Julie Davis 541,200 6,862.42 

Joannopoulos, Sandra 558,100 7,076.71 

Johnson, Ernest 344,400 4,366.99 

Johnson, Ernest & Grace 451,600 5,726.29 

Johnson, H.W. & Jeannine 567,500 7,195.90 

Johnson, Kenneth & Gladys 377,600 4,787.97 

Johnson, Kimmond & Anne 799,200 10,133.86 

Johnson, Kimmond, Tr. 45,000 570.60 

Johnson, Richard & Donna 769,000 9,750.92 

Johnson, Rollin & Hilary 311,100 3,944.75 

Johnson, Stephen & Paula 850,600 10,785.61 

Johnston, Carolyn 293,400 3,720.31 

Joshuas Way Realty Trust 889,400 11,277.59 

Juliano, Paul 117,900 1,494.97 



Kahn, Martin & Susan 480,600 6,094.01 

Kalajian, Michael & Seta 485,800 6,159.94 

Kalams, Spyros & Lisa Mendes 167,400 2,122.63 

Kalba, Konrad & Patricia 392,300 4,974.36 

Kameny, Stuart & Wendy 471,000 5,972.28 

Kanarek, Stephen & Roberta 439,400 5,571.59 

Kania, John & Holly 264,600 3,355.13 

Kao, Peter & Mei-Lin 577,000 7,316.36 

Kasperian, Karl & Carol 633,800 8,036.58 

Kass, Edward & Amalie 886,100 11,235.75 

Kassner, Michael 394,400 5,000.99 

Katz, Saul & Dorothy 293,100 3,716.51 

Kaufman, Marcia(Josephson) 394,800 5,006.06 

Kaye, Harold & Alice 290,300 3,681.00 

Keay, Donald & Mary Ann 404,000 5,122.72 

Keevil, Charles & Hannah 415,200 5,264.74 

Keiley, Philip & Evelyn 130,800 1,658.54 

Kelleher, Robert & Katherine 417,700 5,296.44 

Keller, John & Lanna 188,400 2,388.91 

Kellett, Ann Marie 167,400 2,122.63 



221 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1992 



Kelley, Andrew & Irene 
Kelley, Peter, Tr. 
Kellner-Lundberg, Joan 
Kelman, Jonathan & Pamela B. 
Kendrick, Marvin & Kathleen 
Kennedy Land Corp. 
Kennedy, Albert & Carolyn 
Kennedy, Albert E. 
Kennedy, John P & Sylvia 
Kennedy, John T. 
Kern, Edward & Priscilla 
Kerrebrock, Jack & Bernice 
Kessel, Joseph & Lesley 
Ketteringham, Susan 
Keyes, Janet 
Kiley, Christopher 
Kilgore, Benjamin & Leslie 
Kim, Sungwoon & Sungsil 
Kimball, Joan & John 
Kimnach, Elizabeth 
Kindleberger, Sarah 
King, Eleanor 
King, Pay-Shin & Tong-I 
King, William & Elizabeth 
Kirkpatrick, Margaret 
Kistiakowsky, Irma 
Kitses, Steven & Mary 
Kjellander, Mary C. 
Klem, Christopher & Susan 
Klem, Walter & Mary 
Kling, John & Louise 
Klobuchar, John & N Maribeth 
Knowlton, Anne 
Knox, Wendell & Lucile 
Ko, Nai Nan & Julia 
Koehler, Edward & Margaret 
Kolbin, Lawrence & Rebecca 
Koller, Laura F. 
Kolligian, Zoe 
Konstandakis, Nicholas 
Korhonen, Miriam 
Kornfeld, George & Hulen 
Koumantzelis, Arthur & Vaia 
Koupas, William & Jeanne 
Kraft, Alfred/Meany, Madalon 
Kreidler, Anne II . 



Aggregate Value 


Real Estate 


Real Estate 


Tax 


$ 304,000 


$ 3,854.72 


153,800 


1,950.18 


258,500 


3,277.78 


282,800 


3,585.90 


1,500 


19.02 


53,400 


677.11 


292,100 


3,703.83 


18,000 


228.24 


532,700 


6,754.64 


511,400 


6,484.55 


393,300 


4,987.04 


450,900 


5,717.41 


328,800 


4,169.18 


450,300 


5,709.80 


266,500 


3,379.22 


169,700 


2,151.80 


265,600 


3,367.81 


493,500 


6,257.58 


406,200 


5,150.62 


266,000 


3,372.88 


188,900 


2,395.25 


357,300 


4,530.56 


327,300 


4,150.16 


281,200 


3,565.62 


424,100 


5,377.59 


587,100 


7,444.43 


423,600 


5,371.25 


317,400 


4,024.63 


384,300 


4,872.92 


309,200 


3,920.66 


287,100 


3,640.43 


325,000 


4,121.00 


555,900 


7,048.81 


615,800 


7,808.34 


745,000 


9,446.60 


305,800 


3,877.54 


348,700 


4,421.52 


103,400 


1,311.11 


676,300 


8,575.46 


316,400 


4,011.95 


274,200 


3,476.86 


267,700 


3,394.44 


566,300 


7,180.68 


565,500 


7,170.54 


292,400 


3,707.63 


265,400 


3,365.27 



222 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1992 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Kroin, Lawrence 

Kublk, James & Elizabeth 

Kuhn, Frank & Sally 

Kuhns, Roger & Roberta 

Kulka, J Peter 

Kumar, Anil 

Kumler, Kipton & Katherine 

Kurtz, Arthur 

Kurzina, Peter & Stephanie 

Kusik, Charles & Wendy Palu 



L & J Builders, Inc. 

Lachica, Victor & Lois 

Lackner-Graybiel , James & Ann 

Ladjevardi, Ha bib & Golnaz 

Lafauci, Nicholas A. 

Lahnstein, Richard 

Landis, Mimi 

Landry, Christopher & Barrie 

Lane, J Frank & Kathleen 

Lang, Richard & Betty 

Langton, William & Jane 

Lankhorst, Beverly 

Lathrop, Scott & Beatrice H. 

Lattimore, Geraldinel* David 

Laukien, Frank & Robyn 

Lawrence, Adele 

Lawrence, Inez B. 

Laws on, John 

Lay, Kenneth & Virginia 

Lazaridis, Lazarus & Suzanne 

Leach, Priscilla 

Leaning, J. & Barron, R. 

Leape, Martha 

Lechtenberg , Edward 

Lee, Alan & Deborah Peebles 

Lee, David 

Lee, John & Bo Yeon 

Lee, Kenneth & Marcia 

Lee, Richard & Josephine Gump 

Lee, Shih Ying & Lena 

Lee, Thomas & Barbara 

Lee, Wook & Helen 

Legates, John 

Leger, Mary, Tr. 



400,900 


$ 5,083.41 


423,300 


5,367.44 


232,200 


2,944.30 


519,600 


6,588.52 


548,200 


6,951.17 


710,100 


9,004.07 


698,800 


8,860.78 


365,000 


4,628.20 


305,300 


3,871.20 


317,800 


4,029.70 


230,800 


2,926.54 


119,900 


1,520.33 


475,900 


6,034.41 


934,600 


11,850.73 


420,000 


5,325.60 


208,400 


2,642.51 


575,200 


7,293.54 


779,100 


9,878.99 


556,700 


7,058.96 


453,500 


5,750.38 


537,900 


6,820.57 


314,100 


3,982.79 


415,800 


5,272.34 


368,200 


4,668.78 


624,500 


7,918.66 


274,100 


3,475.59 


434,200 


5,505.66 


128,400 


1,628.11 


526,200 


6,672.22 


395,800 


5,013.74 


119,900 


1,520.33 


448,400 


5,685.71 


439,200 


5,569.06 


469,100 


5,948.19 


448,600 


5,688.25 


201,600 


2,556.29 


313,000 


3,968.84 


449,100 


5,694.59 


618,000 


7,836.24 


502,700 


6,374.24 


533,100 


6,759.71 


116,100 


1,472.15 


589,000 


7,468.52 


187,400 


2,376.23 



223 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1992 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Leggat, Barbara $ 579,400 $ 7,346.79 

Lemander, William & Emily 382,800 4,853.90 

Lemire, Robert & Virginia 388,900 4,931.25 

Lenick, Barry 100,900 1,279.41 

Lenington, Robert & Carolyn 415,700 5,271.08 

Lennon, James & Kathy Rushby 277,200 3,514.90 

Lennon, Stephen & Grace 353,800 4,486.18 

Leong, Joseph & Suzanna Szeto 259,400 3,289.19 

Lerman, Elizabeth 435,800 5,525.94 

Leslie, Paul & Elizabeth 146,500 1,857.62 

Levey Jr, Harold & Ruth 295,000 3,740.60 

Levi, Thomas & Joyce King 334,600 4,242.73 

Levin, Betty, Tr. 393,100 4,984.51 

Levy, Morris & Wendy 363,500 4,609.18 

Levy, Raymond & Nonny 362,400 4,595.23 

Lewis, William 199,300 2,527.12 

Li, Mingche & June 601,900 7,632.09 

Li, Yao T & Nancy 557,100 7,064.03 

Libman, Marcia R. 182,700 2,316.64 

Lie, Henry & Lucy B. 442,400 5,609.63 

Liepins, Atis & Diana 461,100 5,846.75 

Liepmann, W. Hugo & Cynthia 423,400 5,368.71 

Light Jr, Galen & Lois 267,100 3,386.83 

Lin, Augustine & Susan 283,500 3,594.78 

Lincoln Automotive 541,500 6,866.22 

Lincoln Homes Corp. 7,950,300 100,809.80 

Lincoln House Associates 1,617,200 20,506.10 

Lincoln Old Town Hall Corp 143,200 1,815.78 

Lincoln, Robert & Mary G 527,700 6,691.24 

Linstrom, Peter & Maybelle 236,700 3,001.36 

Lippman, Anne & Joan, Trs. 281,000 3,563.08 

Lipsey, Steven & Michaela 681,100 8,636.35 

Liss, Sia & Stovall, John 668,200 8,472.78 

Litte, Rudolph & Irene 367,700 4,662.44 

Little, John & Elizabeth 386,100 4,895.75 

Little, Susan L. 694,400 8,804.99 

Livermore Jr, Robert & Isabel 483,000 6,124.44 

Lo, Chien-Pen & Lucy 211,300 2,679.28 

Lo, Steven & Yi-Chao 273,000 3,461.64 

Lobelson, Jeffrey & Anne 563,200 7,141.38 

Locashio, Philip & Constance 574,500 7,284.66 

Lockwood Jr, Dunbar & Irene 519,400 6,585.99 

Loewenstein, Davida 407,200 5,163.30 

Long, Cathryn 540,200 6,849.74 

Loof , Martin & Melinda W. 223,500 2,833.98 

Loud, Robert & Gwyneth 258,500 3,277.78 



224 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1992 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Lovering, Talbot & Emily $ 325,100 $ 4,122.27 

Low, Stephen & Barbara 472,100 5,986.23 

Ludden, John & Susan 358,900 4,550.85 

Luft, Anne Dore 359,300 4,555.92 

Luijben, Monique 331,300 4,200.88 

Lupo, Robert, Tr. 265,800 3,370.34 

Lustwerk, Ferdinand/ Ingeborg 406,500 5,154.42 

Lutnicki, Harriet 69,100 876.19 

Lutnicki, Victor & Harriet 584,400 7,410.19 

Lyons, Richard 221,200 2,678.02 

Lytle Jr, William 399,600 5,066.93 

Ma, Kee Maggie 106,400 1,349.15 

MacBride, Mary B. 172,100 2,182.23 

Maclnnis, Hazel 198,200 2,513.18 

MacKenzie, Ethel 464,400 5,888.59 

MacKenzie, Murdock & Adeline 342,400 4,341.63 

MacKenzie, Paula/ Vellante, Wm 130,800 1,658.54 

MacKinnon, John & Kristine 116,100 1,472.15 

MacLaurin, Ellen(Mrs. Pierce) 493,100 6,252.51 

MacLean, H Arnold & Corinne 363,100 4,604.11 

MacMahon, D'Arcy & Kathryn 21,600 273.89 

MacMahon, H Edward & Marian 289,500 3,670.86 

MacMahon, Lucia Todd 267,600 3,393.17 

MacNeil, Bruce 423,600 5,371.25 

MacNeil, John & Madge 1,002,800 12,715.50 

MacNeil, Ronald & Wendy 252,500 3,201.70 

MacRae, S. & Broadbent, E. 383,700 4,865.32 

Mahan, Anastasia, Tr. 448,000 5,680.64 

Mahoney, Anne 226,200 2,868.22 

Mahoney, John & Eleanor 407,300 5,164.56 

Maier, Emanuel & Sylvia 458,000 5,807.44 

Maki, Mark & Margaret 100,200 1,270.54 

Mallows, Minette, Tr. 227,600 2,885.97 

Malloy, David 174,700 2,215.20 

Malloy, Robert & David 101,700 1,289.56 

Maloney Jr, Bernard & Janet 503,000 6,378.04 

Mannarino, Joseph & Florence 176,000 2,231.68 

Manning, Catherine 239,100 3,031.79 

Mansfield, Frederick & Joan 526,600 6,677.29 

Mansfield, James & Sarah 359,600 4,559.73 

Manuel, John 101,800 1,290.82 

Manzelli, Janet G. 670,900 8,507.01 

Manzelli, John & Dorothy 253,800 3,218.18 

Maranian, Arthur & Helen 536,100 6,797.75 



225 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1992 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Marc, Kathleen M. $ 396,500 $ 5,027.62 

Marcks, Ronald & Barbara 424,300 5,380.12 

Marcus, Fred & Patricia Wong 422,100 5,352.23 

Marcuvitz, Andrew & Eileen 842,200 10,679.10 

Marier, Bruce & Suzanne 411,800 5,221.62 

Marino, Kenneth & Kelley 302,100 3,830.63 

Maroni, Kevin J., Tr. 691,300 8,765.68 

Maroni, Marilyn P., Tr. 25,800 327.14 

Marple, Gary & Meredith R 483,300 6,128.24 

Marsden, Peter & Mary 276,400 3,504.75 

Marsh, Paul 619,100 7,850.19 

Marstall, Jerry & Nancy 383,700 4,865.32 

Martin, Robert & Margaret 272,900 3,460.37 

Martin, Wins low & Anne 225,400 2,856.07 

Martinez, Norberto 240,400 3,048.27 

Mascari, Rita & Luciano 495,000 6,276.60 

Mason, Elizabeth & Max 294,700 3,736.80 

Mason, Virginia 436,400 5,533.55 

Massachusetts Port Authority 1,001,900 12,704.09 

Masters, Joseph 542,200 6,875.10 

Masters, Joseph, Tr. 469,200 5,949.46 

Mastrobattista, John 116,900 1,482.29 

Mattes, Sara & Ritz, Jerome 436,200 5,531.02 

Maurer, David 216,600 2,746.49 

Maxwell, Patricia/Walker, Win. 312,400 4,961.23 

May Jr, James & Linda 831,800 10,547.22 

May, Doris 260,700 3,305.68 

Mayfield, Glover & Gale 433,000 5,490.44 

McAleer, Harold & Shirley 516,700 6,551.76 

McCann, Sylvia & John 439,600 5,574.13 

McCart, Robert & Rose, Trs 537,500 6,815.50 

McCarthy, Paul & Wladyslawa 620,100 7,862.86 

McCarthy, Stephen & Phoebe 575,800 7,301.14 

McColl, Archibald & Delight 266,700 3,381.76 

McConchie, James & Linda 481,400 6,104.15 

McCune, William & Elizabeth 1,514,400 19,202.58 

McDermott, Thomas & Gloria 1,096,800 13,907.42 

McDougald, Ronald & Kathleen 612,600 7,767.77 

McDougald, etc. c/o Caswell 15,500 196.54 

McGinty, Robert & Kerry 377,500 4,786.70 

McGovern, John & Anna 344,500 4,368.26 

McHale, Kevin 1,007,900 12,780.17 

McHugh, James & Katherine 464,600 5,891.13 

Mclnnes, Richard & Barbara 651,100 8,255.95 

Mclnnis, Donald & Joan 354,300 4,492.52 

McKelvy, Douglas 338,100 4,287.11 



226 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1992 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



McKenney, James & Janis $ 435,800 $ 5,525.94 

McKnight, Eleanor J. 390,500 4,951.54 

McKnight, Ernest Ex. 262,900 3,333.57 

McLaughlin, James 7,800 98.90 

McMorrow, Maureen & Richard 625,500 8,931.34 

Meade, Edmund & Eleanor 457,600 5,802.37 

Mecsas, Michael & Mary 448,400 5,685.71 

Meeks, M Littleton & Louise 431,000 5,465.08 

Melanson, Leonard & Mary 206,700 2,620.96 

Menkis, Jonathan & Linda 364,100 4,616.79 

Meretzky, Steven & Elizabeth 415,900 5,273.61 

Meriam, Ellin 289,600 3,672.13 

Merrill, Vincent & Anne 321,600 4,077.89 

Merullo, Anthony & Donna 300,200 3,806.54 

Meshulam, Deborah, Tr. 194,600 2,467.53 

Messina, Elena 532,500 6,752.10 

Meyer, Eugene & Melissa 1,037,200 13,151.70 

Meyers, Richard & Gail 232,600 2,949.37 

Michener, Susanah 203,500 2,580.38 

Mikropoulos, Harilaos Tr. 483,500 6,130.78 

Milender, Sumner & Edith 487,400 6,180.23 

Millard Jr, Dona Id /Catherine 679,800 8,619.86 

Millard, Donald & Jeannette 804,800 10,204.86 

Millard, Susan & David 702,200 8,903.90 

Miller, Arthur R. 990,400 12,558.27 

Miller, David & Karen 204,300 2,590.52 

Miller, Harold & Marcheta 541,900 6,871.29 

Miller, Keith & Janet 567,100 7,190.83 

Miller, Stephen & Natalie 441,900 5,603.29 

Minnick, Martha 253,300 3,211.84 

Mintz, Norbett & Carol 437,800 5,551.30 

Minuteman Tech Voc. H.S. 562,500 7,132.50 

Mitchell, W Randle & Kay 362,600 4,597.77 

Mix, Thomas/ Flannery, S & S 404,600 5,130.33 

Mixon, Scott 336,100 4,261.75 

Mohn, Susan W. 171,300 2,172.08 

Mohr, John & Jean 759,300 9,627.92 

Moller, Cynthia 237,600 3,012.77 

Montgomery, Maurice/ Florence 309,900 3,929.53 

Moor, Edgar & Joan 617,600 7,831.17 

Moore, Dorothy 248,100 3,145.91 

Moore, Murvale & Negarre, Trs 392,200 4,973.10 

Moran, David & Mary B. 412,200 5,226.70 

Morey, Kenneth & Ruth 199,000 2,523.32 

Morgan, Edward & Terri 280,800 3,560.54 

Morgan, Henry M. Tr. 564,300 7,155.32 



227 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1992 



Morgan, Robert & Marcia 

Morganti, Victor & Helga 

Moritz, Ka thy /Michael & Chong 

Morris, Beatrice 

Morris, Lloyd & Katherine 

Morrissey, J Neil & Mary 

Morse, Gerald & Merna 

Morse, Thomas 

Morse, William & Patricia 

Morss Jr, Charles 

Morton, Peter 

Mosch, Karl & Joan 

Moses, Meredyth & John 

Mosher, David & Claire 

Mosher/Schliemann, Trs. 

Moss, Elizabeth 

Moss, Karen 

Moss, Leonard & Frances 

Moss , Philip & Jane 

Moss, Sidney 

Moss, Sidney & Silke 

Mount, Wayne & Claire 

Mozzi, Robert & Ruth 

Mrakovich, David & Gertrude 

Mrugala, Anthony 

Mucchetti, Stephen & Rebecca 

Mueller, Robert & Jane 

Mulcahy, Douglas & Beverly F 

Mulligan, Richard & Marilyn 

Mundt, Kevin & Jayne 

Munroe Jr, William & Mary 

Murphy Jr, William & Louise 

Murphy, Bartholomew & Sara S 

Murphy, Patrick & Charlene 

Murphy, Ruth 

Mutschler, Louis & Phyllis 

Myers , Lucy 

Mygatt, Samuel & Susan H 

Myles, Theresa & J Richard 



Nabih, Ismail 

Nadolski, Thomas & Rosemary 

Nagy, John 

Naiman, Mark & Adeline 

Najarian, K George & Carolann 



Aggregate Value 


Real Estate 


Real Estate 


Tax 


$ 526,500 


$ 6,676.02 


522,300 


6,622.76 


830,800 


10,534.54 


194,600 


2,467.53 


254,200 


3,223.26 


230,600 


2,924.01 


328,600 


4,166.65 


525,500 


6,663.34 


652,200 


8,269.90 


305,200 


3,869.94 


290,000 


3,677.20 


623,300 


7,903.44 


512,800 


6,502.30 


824,900 


10,459.73 


58,300 


739.24 


777,300 


9,856.16 


267,400 


3,390.63 


354,500 


4,495.06 


450,500 


5,712.34 


19,900 


252.33 


414,400 


5,254.59 


393,600 


4,990.85 


416,100 


5,276.15 


392,600 


4,978.17 


247,000 


3,131.96 


961,800 


12,195.62 


602,100 


7,634.63 


227,500 


2,884.70 


527,800 


6,692.50 


772,600 


9,796.57 


396,300 


5,025.08 


1,500 


19.02 


282,000 


3,575.76 


245,600 


3,114.21 


443,200 


5,619.78 


479,500 


6,080.06 


290,800 


3,687.34 


501,300 


6,356.48 


383,300 


4,860.24 


522,200 


6,621.50 


442,300 


5,608.36 


314,800 


3,991.66 


283,900 


3,599.85 


627,400 


7,955.43 



228 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1992 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Najjar, Edward & Gail 
Nalezienski, John & Kimberly 
Napier, S. & Fitts, Chas Jr 
Narayan, Ramesh & Vani 
Nardi, Edward & Jean 
Nardone, Nancy 
Nawoichik, Elsie 
Neiley, Alexander & Diana 
Neister, John 

Nelson, Albert/Mar jorie/Robt 
Nenneman, Richard & Katherine 
Neri, John & Ingrid 
Nessen, E. Richard 
Nesto, Bruno 
Neumann, Sylvia 
Newbold Trust No. 1 
Newbold, Thomas & Noreen 
Newburger, Babette, Tr. 
Newcombe, Charles & Lawrence 
Newcombe, Lawrence 
Newell , Lena 
Newman, Robert & Mary S 
Newton Jr, George & Suzanne 
Nichols, Anthony/Mary Sallee 
Nichols, Richard & Heidi 
Nicholson, Kathryn 
Nickerson, Bruce 
Nickerson, Elizabeth P 
Nicolaides, Paris Tr. 
Niedermeyer, Bernard & Joanne 
Nielson, David & Linda 
Niles, Robert & Virginia 
Nisbet, Ian & Shirley 
Nockles, William & Diane 
Nopakun, Suvitya & Apilaj 
Norris, Est. of Mary 
Norris, Lindsay 
Noss, George & Millicent 
Notkin, Leonard & Ann 



Oak, Ingul & Setsuko 
O'Brien, Daniel & Mary 
O'Brien, John H. 
O'Brien, John J. 
O'Brien, Joseph & Virginia 



$1,020,300 


$12,937.40 


402,300 


5,101.16 


229,100 


2,904.99 


541,700 


6,868.76 


380,200 


4,820.94 


554,200 


7,027.26 


531,800 


6,743.22 


406,300 


5,151.88 


450,500 


5,712.34 


296,000 


3,753.28 


497,300 


6,305.76 


195,200 


2,475.14 


448,900 


5,692.05 


21,500 


272.62 


846,800 


10,737.43 


184,700 


2,342.00 


239,900 


3,041.93 


350,000 


4,438.00 


481,400 


6,104.15 


200,100 


2,537.27 


279,800 


3,547.86 


1,275,600 


16,174.61 


427,800 


5,424.50 


130,800 


1,658.54 


176,500 


2,238.02 


556,400 


7,055.15 


235,300 


2,983.60 


531,100 


6,734.35 


825,300 


10,464.80 


708,600 


8,985.05 


414,200 


5,252.06 


368,000 


4,666.24 


405,100 


5,136.67 


344,000 


4,361.92 


503,100 


6,379.31 


246,600 


3,126.89 


172,700 


2,189.84 


211,100 


2,676.75 


289,500 


3,670.86 


388,400 


4,924.91 


310,400 


3,935.87 


196,200 


2,487.82 


292,100 


3,703.83 


324,800 


4,118.46 



229 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1992 



O'Connor, Daniel 
' Connor , John 
Ogden, David & Judith 
Ohl, Irina 
Ohl, John & Katrina 
Olivieri, James & Dorothy 
O'Loughlin, John & Joanne 
01s en, Kenneth & Elva-Liisa 
Olshansky, Kenneth & Hope G 
O'Neil, David 
O'Neill, Philip & Lisa A. 
Ong, Robin & Hsiao-Mei 
Onigman, Marc & Maureen 
O'Rourke, Paul & Marilyn 
Osborne , Gordon 
Outten, Henry & Nancy 
Owen R Calvin & Ellen 
Owen, C & MacAloney, P. 
Owen, Donald 



Paboojian-Hagopian, Helen 
Paddock, Ann & Kelley, Penny 
Paddock, James & Ilga 
Page Jr, Walter & Susan 
Page, Lot & Patricia 
Page, Stanley & Elisabeth 
Paglierani, Lawrence & Pamela 
Paik, Sungik & Wanda 
Paine, Robert & Mary 
Palmer, Attelio & Kathryne 
Palmer, Gerald & Jean 
Pampel, Roland & Carol 
Panetta, Frank & James 
Panetta, Frank Jr Tr. 
Panetta, Frank, Tr. 
Panetta, James & Rosemary 
Panetta, Rita 
Panetta, Theresa, Tr. 
Pantazelos, Peter & Hytho 
Paoletti, George & Adeline K 
Parke IV, Nathan & Ann 
Parker, Jackson & Jacqueline 
Parla, John 
Parsons, David & Mary 
Pasieka, John 



Aggregate Value 


R.eal Estate 


Real Estate 


Tax 


$ 185,300 


$ 2,349.60 


465,400 


5,901.27 


301,000 


3,816.68 


124,900 


1,583.73 


377,400 


4,785.43 


215,100 


2,727.47 


403,700 


5,118.92 


813,100 


10,310.11 


364,300 


4,619.32 


395,900 


5,020.01 


623,400 


7,904.71 


637,400 


8,082.23 


247,100 


3,133.23 


956,800 


12,132.22 


698,100 


8,851.90 


351,600 


4,458.29 


320,800 


4,067.74 


319,400 


4,049.99 


365,200 


4,630.74 


303,800 


3,852.18 


124,900 


1,583.73 


526,200 


6,672.22 


575,900 


7,302.41 


437,000 


5,541.16 


252,200 


3,197.90 


362,900 


4,601.57 


541,300 


6,863.68 


219,500 


2,783.26 


268,200 


3,400.78 


500,900 


6,351.41 


596,900 


7,568.69 


31,000 


393.08 


517,400 


6,560.63 


189,100 


2,397.79 


187,100 


2,372.43 


181,100 


2,296.35 


344,600 


4,369.53 


855,100 


10,842.67 


182,600 


2,315.37 


630,400 


7,993.47 


385,400 


4,886.87 


572,900 


7,264.37 


330,900 


4,195.81 


197,900 


2,509.37 



230 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1992 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Pastoriza, James & Ruth $ 507,700 $ 6,437.64 

Patalano, Vincent & Sandra 1,088,600 13,803.45 

Payne, H Morse & Helen 214,200 2,716.06 

Payne, Roger 470,300 5,963.41 

Payne, William & Mary 569,400 7,219.99 

Pearlman, Robert 315,400 3,999.27 

Pearmain, W Robert & Claire 554,400 7,029.79 

Peavy Jr, Leopold & Elizabeth 739,800 9,380.66 

Pejchar, Jan & Linda 364,000 4,615.52 

Peloquin, Roy 190,800 2,419.34 

Perera Jr, Guido & Joan 684,400 8,678.19 

Perkins, Simon & Marianne 119,900 1,520.33 

Perlman, Samuel & Marjorie 903,800 11,460.18 

Perlmutter, Steven & Terry 469,700 5,955.80 

Perry, A.W. & Judith 426,800 5,411.82 

Perry, David & Deborah 482,300 6,115.56 

Perry, John C & Sarah 482,700 6,120.64 

Perry, John R & Marilyn 238,300 3,021.64 

Peterson, Mary 593,200 7,521.78 

Pettigrew, Valerie & Brian 644,600 8,173.53 

Phalon, Susan 167,000 2,117.56 

Phelps, Robert & Elizabeth 405,000 5,135.40 

Phelps-Braun, Diane 537,100 6,810.43 

Phillipps, Patrick & Janice 536,300 6,800.29 

Phillips, Charlotte 728,400 9,236.12 

Phinney, Jean 210,600 2,670.41 

Pho, Johnny & Ada 393,900 4,994.65 

Pianka, Walter & Ann 437,300 5,544.96 

Picker, Dennis & Jenifer B. 340,600 4,318.81 

Pickett, Robert & Andrew 491,600 6,233.49 

Pickett, Robert C. & Martha 303,800 3,852.18 

Pickman, Anthony & Alice 1,260,200 15,979.34 

Pier son, Marie & Mark 277,300 3,516.16 

Pike, John & Mary 710,700 9,011.68 

Pine Loch Realty Trust 804,200 10,197.25 

Pingeon, James 217,700 2,760.44 

Pino, Frank 234,200 2,969.65 

Pinto, Robert 198,800 2,520.78 

Pinto, Robert & Clare 272,800 3,459.10 

Pippen, Wesley 165,500 2,098.54 

Pique, Gonzalo & Janet 303,800 3,852.18 

Piscataway Realty Trust 31,000 393.08 

Pitkin, Bonny 100,200 1,270.54 

Plouffe, Francis & Gerene 339,900 4,309.93 

Plukas, John & Anne 753,900 9,559.45 

Polaroid Corporation 26,500 336.02 



231 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1992 



Aggregate Value Real Estate; 
Real Estate Tax 



Polino, Rosa/Bombara, Mark 
Ponn, Richard & Nancy 
Potter, Ruth/DiLuzlo, Rudolph 
Poulos, Charles 
Poulos, Charles & Sophie 
Powers Jr, Francis & Helen 
Powers, Martin & Diana 
Preston, Katharine 
Preston, William M 
Preston, William M 
Privitera, Salvatore, Tr. 
Protopapa, Sejfi 
Pruitt, Stephen & Denise 
Prussing, Carl & Karen 
Puffer Jr, Richard & Margaret 
Pugh III, Alexander & Julia 



Quadri, Michael & Lida A. 
Quan , Mary 

Quart on, Gardner & Frances 
Quayle, Dwight & Deborah 
Quelch, John & Joyce 



Raag, Valvo & Kaija 
Rabinowitz , Samuel/Stanislawa 
Ragan, Ralph & Ruth 
Raggio, Gabriel & Alejandra 
Raghavan, Lakshminarasimhan 
Raja, Roy & Ellen 
Rando, Thomas J 
Rappaport, Jerome & Phyllis 
Rapperport, Eugene & Lucy 
Rappoli, Arthur & Dorothy 
Rasco, Austin & Suzanne 
Raws on, Edward & Nancy 
Ray, Kenneth & Marjorie 
Ray, Ruth V. 
Ream, William & Barbara 
Redden, Hugh & Linda 
Redmond , Ros emary 
Reece, Richard & Susan 
Reed, Patricia R. 
Reid, Cynthia 
Reid, Watson 



119,900 


$ 1,520.33 


843,100 


10,690.51 


398,000 


5,046.64 


238,700 


3,026.72 


351,500 


4,457.02 


230,900 


2,927.81 


265,700 


3,369.08 


447,300 


5,671.76 


628,700 


7,971.92 


25,600 


324.61 


616,800 


7,821.02 


527,800 


6,692.50 


241,000 


3,055.88 


10,900 


138.21 


440,200 


5,581.74 


399,600 


5,066.93 


265,500 


3,366.54 


103,700 


1,314.92 


397,700 


5,042.84 


477,300 


6,052.16 


989,400 


12,545.59 


703,200 


8,916.58 


414,800 


5,259.66 


308,900 


3,916.85 


222,000 


2,814.96 


648,400 


8,221.71 


363,800 


4,612.98 


431,300 


5,468.88 


803,800 


10,192.18 


323,700 


4,104.52 


317,200 


4,022.10 


491,200 


6,228.42 


372,300 


4,720.76 


285,500 


3,620.14 


443,700 


5,626.12 


433,700 


5,499.32 


264,400 


3,352.59 


409,400 


5,191.19 


416,900 


5,286.29 


297,400 


3,771.03 


209,600 


2,657.73 


556,400 


7,055.15 



232 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1992 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Reidel, Arthur H $ 237,600 $ 3,012.77 

Reider, W James & Ruth 352,300 4,467.16 

Reiman, Peter & Patricia 267,400 3,390.63 

Reinherz, Bernard & Barbara 80Q,200 10,146.54 

Reinherz, Ellis L 431,100 5,466.35 

Reiser, George 773,000 9,801.64 

Reiman, Arnold & Harriet 517,600 6,563.17 

Repko, Bruce 172,500 2,187.10 

Resnick, Charles & Marie 479,200 6,076.26 

Restuccia, Michael & Penelope 607,300 7,700.56 

Revis, Kenneth & Judith 484,700 6,146.00 

Rheinlander, Harold/Eleanor 222,900 2,826.37 

Ricci, Russell & Carla 483,000 6,124.44 

Rice, Clifton & Margaret 472,400 5,990.03 

Rice, David B. 338,000 4,285.84 

Rice, James & Barbara 278,300 3,528.84 

Rice, John & Nathalie 229,400 2,908.79 

Rice, Paul G 433,200 5,492.98 

Richards, Ruth 322,300 4,086.76 

Richardson, Frederick/ Inge 364,700 4,624.40 

Ries, David/ Sutherland, Ann 406,300 5,151.88 

Riker, Evelyn 214,600 2,721.13 

Risch, Martin, Tr. 303,700 3,850.92 

Risley, Curtis & Jean 409,300 5,189.92 

Risser, Thomas & Tranquilina 913,000 11,576.84 

Ritchie, James & Nancy 221,400 2,807.35 

Ritsher, Cynthia W. 262,600 3,329.77 

Rizzo, Jane L. 479,000 6,073.72 

Robbat, Joseph & Dana 937,500 11,887.50 

Robbins, Deborah A. 231,700 2,937.96 

Robbins, Roland & Geraldine 197,900 2,509.37 

Robinson, John & Ragnhild 505,100 6,404.67 

Robson, Edwin & Ann 130,800 1,658.54 

Rodman, Laura 762,300 9,665.96 

Roehr, Marcia 746,900 9,470.69 

Rogers, Alfred & Louise 417,200 5,290.10 

Rogers, Chris & Cathy 271,300 3,440.08 

Rogers, Harriet & Joseph, Trs 377,200 4,782.90 

Rolfe, Edward & Stephanie 385,700 4,890.68 

Rollins, James 422,500 5,357.30 

Rose, James & Glenys 303,300 3,845.84 

Rose, Stuart & Margie 418,900 5,311.65 

Rosen, Edward & Esther 212,900 2,699.57 

Rosen, Joseph 211,200 2,678.02 

Rosenberg, Carl & Judith 606,000 7,684.08 

Rosenberry, Dale & Mary-Ellen 307,200 3,895.30 



233 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1992 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Rosenblatt, Max & Alice $1,144,900 $14,517.33 

Rosenthal, Richard 212,900 2,699.57 

Ross, Paul & Rita 432,500 5,484.10 

Ross, William & Marian 380,600 4,826.01 

Rossiter, Selina 483,900 6,135.85 

Rossoni, Paola 161,500 2,047.82 

Rossoni, Paola & Family 509,300 6,457.92 

Rossoni, Peter/Philip/Lucia/Elizabeth 216,400 2,743.95 

Rote, Ann Chatham 358,300 4,543.24 

Roth, Lisa F. 513,100 6,506.11 

Rothstein, Peter & Alan 137,700 1,746.04 

Row, Ronald & Jane 480,000 6,086.40 

Roy, Eugene U. 231,500 2,935.42 

Rudnick, Mitchell & Rosalie 690,400 8,754.27 

Rugo, Henry & Faith 504,600 6,398.33 

Rural Land Foundation 3,137,900 39,788.57 

Russell, Mary-Ellen 415,800 5,272.34 

Russell, Michael & Nancy P. 261,700 3,318.36 

Russell, Miles & Elaine 717,600 9,099.17 

Russell, William & Anne 911,100 11,552.75 

Ryan Estate Nominee Trust 281,500 3,569.42 

Ryan, Alice E. 338,100 4,287.11 

Ryan, Alice/Sweeney, Joanne 177,900 2,255.77 

Ryan, James & Helen 267,200 3,388.10 

Ryan, Marjorie H. 324,500 4,114.66 

Ryan, William & Helen 439,100 5,567.79 



Sabbag, Arthur & Evelyn 272,200 3,451.50 

Sac er dote, Luciana 239,600 3,038.13 

Sachs, Gary & Maryanne 940,300 11,923.00 

Sachs, Reynold M. 562,300 7,129.96 

Sacknoff , Eric & Kathleen 810,200 10,273.34 

Sakowich, Stephen J. 141,700 1,796.76 

Salem, Deeb & Patricia 674,600 8,553.93 

Salmon, Marjorie B. 449,700 5,702.20 

Salvini, David K. Tr. 399,000 5,059.32 

Sanadi, D Rao & Mary Jane 394,900 5,007.33 

Sanchez, Ronald A. & Nina 255,000 3,233.40 

Sands, Mary M. 238,700 3,026.72 

Santa, Cecelia F. 272,500 3,455.30 

Sartori, Louis & Ruth 450,400 5,711.07 

Sartori, Louis R. 154,900 1,964.13 

Satterfield, Anne P., Tr. 465,500 5,902.54 

Savage, William G. 347,800 4,410.10 

Sawtell, Clement & Adelaide 414,500 5,255.86 



234 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1992 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Scheff, Andrew $ 223,900 $ 2,839.05 

Scheff, Benson & Betty 481,400 6,104.15 

Scheft, William & Gertrude 268,800 3,408.38 

Scheuer, Harry 374,000 4,742.32 

Schildbach, Muriel 154,500 1,959.06 

Schiller, Joan 337,700 4,282.04 

Schliemann Peter/Diane Page 124,800 1,582.46 

Schliemann, Peter C. 613,700 7,781.72 

Schmertzler, Margaretta/Alvin 482,300 6,115.56 

Schmid, Wilfried & Marina 857,900 10,878.17 

Schmidt, John E. 361,200 4,580.02 

Schneider, Robert & Patricia 345,200 4,377.14 

Schudy, Robert & Linelle 128,500 1,629.38 

Schuller, Edward & Elizabeth 349,900 4,436.73 

Schulte, Robert D. & Linda S 652,600 8,274.97 

Schultz, Charles & Tokiko 103,400 1,311.11 

Schwann, William & Aire-Maija 392,700 4,979.44 

Schwann, William, Exec. 247,100 3,133.23 

Schwartz, Edward A. 472,500 5,991.30 

Schwartz, Ellen A. 399,200 5,061.86 

Scott, Eleanor B. 368,900 4,677.65 

Scotti, Regina 175,300 2,222.80 

Seaver, John & Millicent 410,100 5,200.07 

Seckler, Donald & Joann S. 418,300 5,304.04 

Sederquist, Douglas/ Patricia 199,500 2,529.66 

Seeckts, E William & Eleanor 607,700 7,705.64 

Seeley, George W. & Susan 307,500 3,899.10 

Seitz, C. Clayton & Ellen 629,900 7,987.14 

Self, Craig L. 280,800 3,560.54 

Selland, James 0. 236,800 3,002.62 

Seising, Erik J. & Jo-Ellen 223,800 2,837.78 

Semerjian, Evan & Barbara 452,300 5,735.16 

Servi, Leslie & Varda Haimo 387,300 4,910.96 

Seville, Alfred & Joan 399,900 5,070.73 

Sewall, Steven & Susan 654,500 8,299.06 

Shansky, Alan 100,400 1,273.07 

Shansky, David & Nettie 412,600 5,231.77 

Shapiro, David & Esther 468,300 5,938.04 

Shapse, Steven N. 203,900 2,585.45 

Shapse, Steven/ We ins tein, S. 358,900 4,550.85 

Shaw, Michael & Lynette 568,700 7,211.12 

Shaye, Glenn, Tr. 627,900 7,961.77 

Shea, Timothy & Deborah B. 276,100 3,500.95 

Sheehan, Gerald & Brigid 322,500 4,089.30 

Sheik, Mehrdad & Roya Agah 279,900 3,549.13 

Sheldon, Mary W. 375,400 4,760.07 



235 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1992 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Shuman, Mark & Lena 
Shyam-Sunder, Sivaraj/Lakshmi 
Sichel, Enid 

Silvers te in, A. /Malkasian, R. 
Silverstein, Fred & Mary 
Simmons, Jeffrey & Patricia 
Simon, Michael & Margaret 
Simourian, John 
Sioshansi, Piran & Mitra 
Sisson, Barbara B. 
Sisson, John H. & Barbara, Tr 
Skinner, Hope & Est. Louis 
Slavin, Gerald D 
Slayter, Henry S. & Barbara 
Sliski, Alan & Susan 
Smallman, Robert H. & Mary 
Smith, Alan & Marjorie 
Smith, Beverly J. 
Smith, Carl & Florence 
Smith, Colin L. & Diana 
Smith, Converse & Nellie 
Smith, Edward W. & Anne 
Smith, Grahame J.C. 
Smith, Harold & Elizabeth 
Smith, Kathleen 
Smith, Peter & Linda 
Smith, Robert L. & Nancy 
Smith, Steven & Karen 
Smulowicz, Bronislaw/Sawera 
Smyers, Karen J. 
Snell, John & Janet F. 
Snelling, Carolyn R. 
Snelling, Charles 
Snelling, Howard & Elizabeth 
Snelling , Jacquelyn 
Snelling, John R 
Soc. Preservation NE Antiqui 
Solar, Barry & Judith 
Solar, Jane M. 
Solman, Fred John & Claire 
Spaeth, Daniel & Margaret 
Speen, George & Claire 
Speert, Peter & Faye 
Sperling, Arnold & Charmian 
Spiliakos, John S. 
Spindler, James & Mary 



511,900 


$ 6,490.89 


357,300 


4,530.56 


294,700 


3,736.80 


302,000 


3,829.36 


273,400 


3,466.71 


585,100 


7,419.07 


396,000 


5,021.28 


481,000 


6,099.08 


652,900 


8,278.77 


392,600 


4,978.17 


188,700 


2,392.72 


,002,000 


12,705.36 


389,800 


4,942.66 


384,700 


4,878.00 


507,100 


6,430.03 


578,600 


7,336.65 


495,600 


6,284.21 


215,600 


2,733.81 


293,000 


3,715.24 


447,900 


5,679.37 


420,100 


5,326.87 


215,900 


2,737.61 


215,900 


2,737.61 


370,500 


4,697.94 


209,600 


2,657.73 


1,500 


19.02 


650,800 


8,252.14 


360,300 


4,568.60 


351,700 


4,459.56 


286,100 


3,627.75 


227,400 


2,883.43 


264,800 


3,357.66 


287,600 


3,646.77 


248,700 


3,153.52 


372,700 


4,725.84 


246,300 


3,123.08 


213,800 


2,710.98 


578,000 


7,329.04 


390,100 


4,946.47 


407,500 


5,167.10 


231,100 


2,930.35 


552,800 


7,009.50 


593,000 


7,519.24 


325,800 


4,131.14 


898,300 


11,390.44 


682,100 


8,649.03 



236 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1992 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Spinosa, Kathleen 
Spooner, Susan B. 
Sprague, Mary-Jane 
Sprayregen, Lucy P. 
Squibb, Mildred G. 
Stain, Allan & Kathleen 
S tankard, Charles & Jean 
Stanzler, Alan & Margaret 
Staples, K & Kearsley, J 
Stason, William & Susan 
Staszesky, Barbara & Francis 
Stathis, Gregory & Marjorie 
Stathos, Charles & Margaret 
Stebbins Realty Trust 
Stecher, Robert & Barbara 
Stein, Kitty/Langell, John 
Steinsky, Rudolph/ Hayes, Donna 
Stetson, David & Athena 
Stevens Jr., Edmund & Shari 
Stevenson, John & Patricia 
Stevenson, Philip & Joan 
Stewart, Francis & Ruth 
Stock, James H. & Anne 
Stoddard, Roger & Helen 
Stone , Edmund 
Storer, James & Sandra A. 
Stout, Josephine 
Stratford Realty 
Stratton, Nancy F. 
Straus, Haskel & Barbara 
Strecker, William & Nancy 
Street, Earle & Janet 
Striker, Marjorie 
Strock, Bruce & Deborah 
Subsick, Walter J. 
Sugar, Susan K. 
Summers , Julia 
Sussman, Joseph & Henri-Ann 
Sutherland, Robert/Marion 
Svetz, Paul & Linda 
Swain, Douglas & Rhonda 
Swanson, Richard & Nancy 
Sweeney, Carl & Alice 
Swett , Joan 
Swift, Phyllis 
Sykes, David F. 



558,100 


$ 7,076.71 


154,500 


1,959.06 


237,600 


3,012.77 


508,500 


6,447.78 


229,600 


2,911.33 


787,200 


9,981.70 


389,700 


4,941.40 


720,100 


9,130.86 


710,700 


9,011.68 


563,900 


7,150.25 


242,800 


3,078.70 


461,900 


5,856.89 


517,700 


6,564.44 


235,100 


2,981.07 


547,500 


6,942.30 


285,400 


3,618.87 


702,200 


8,903.90 


736,400 


9,337.55 


547,100 


6,937.23 


405,400 


5,140.47 


532,400 


6,750.83 


390,700 


4,954.08 


542,300 


6,876.36 


306,300 


3,883.88 


995,800 


12,626.74 


415,200 


5,264.74 


250,900 


3,181.41 


2,359,600 


29,919.74 


435,000 


5,515.80 


603,200 


7,648.58 


752,700 


9,544.24 


455,000 


5,769.40 


284,800 


3,611.26 


595,200 


7,547.14 


4,300 


54.52 


577,100 


7,317.63 


390,500 


4,951.54 


503,000 


6,378.04 


316,600 


4,014.49 


422,600 


5,358.57 


425,700 


5,397.88 


244,500 


3,100.26 


401,700 


5,093.56 


235,600 


2,987.41 


389,400 


4,937.59 


335,200 


4,250.34 



237 



VALUATION LIST, 


JULY 1, 1992 






Aggregate Value 


Real Estate 




Real Estate 


Tax 


Sylvia, Craig, Paul & Mark 


$ 301,400 


$ 3,821.75 


Tall Pines Realty Trust 


1,500 


19.02 


Tang, Eric & Doreen 


836,600 


10,608.09 


Tang, Thomas & Connie 


192,000 


2,434.56 


Tannert, H Michael & Joanna H 


343,100 


4,350.51 


Tartaglia, Giovanni & Lucia 


266,100 


3,374.15 


Tartaglia, Nunzio & Hollace 


911,700 


11,560.36 


Taschioglou, Kemon & Rhoda 


559,400 


7,093.19 


Tat em, Leonard J 


182,600 


2,315.37 


Tatlock, Richard & Jane 


480,700 


6,095.28 


Taunt on-Rigby, Alison 


346,100 


4,388.55 


Tavilla, J David & Dorothea 


685,400 


8,690.87 


Taylor, David & Cormay, T. 


197,300 


2,501.76 


Taylor, Edward S. 


505,700 


6,412.28 


Taylor, Gerald & Susan 


548,500 


6,954.98 


Taylor, Julius & Lois 


452,000 


5,731.36 


Taylor, Timothy & Jeannine 


288,600 


3,659.45 


Taylor, W Royce & Dorothy 


362,100 


4,591.43 


Taylor, William & Joyce 


621,600 


7,881.89 


Teabo, Prince & Elizabeth 


260,900 


3,308.21 


Telling, Irving & Jane 


398,800 


5,056.78 


Tenneco, Inc. 


1,700 


21.56 


Tennican, Michael & Catherine 


532,400 


6,750.83 


Terrell, John & Mary 


297,400 


3,771.03 


Tetreault, Claire F., Tr. 


464,000 


5,883.52 


Theriault, Richard & Vita 


590,800 


7,491.34 


Thiele, Lessie E. 


1,515,400 


19,215.27 


Thomas Jr. , George & Jane 


249,800 


3,167.46 


Thompson, Lawrence & Dorothy 


433,000 


5,490.44 


Thompson, Randall Jr. & Delia 


889,300 


11,276.33 


Thomson, Anne P. 


283,400 


3,593.51 


Thome, Karen 0. 


309,900 


3,929.53 


Thornton, Peter & Ann 


20,900 


265.01 


Three S Realty Trust 


633,600 


8,034.05 


Thurow, Lester & Gretchen P 


880,200 


11,160.94 


Ticknor, H Malcolm 


269,000 


3,410.92 


Tierney, John L. & Jane 


494,400 


6,268.99 


Tinder, Glenn & Gloria 


428,100 


5,428.31 


Tingley, Frederick & Dilla 


332,700 


4,218.64 


Tod, Jane N. 


202,300 


2,565.16 


Todd, Conrad 


793,100 


10,056.50 


Toksoz, M Nafi & Helena 


182,300 


2,311.56 


Tomasic, Beverly F. 


637,600 


8,084.77 


Tong, Pin & Siang 


281,100 


3,564.35 



238 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1992 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Tonry, John & Maureen H. 
|Torode, Herbert & Lorraine 
Torri, Myra M. 
Torti Jr. , Maurice & Nancy 
Tracey, Robert & Caroline 
Tracey, Robert J. 
Tracy, Tara 

Travers, Paul & Bernice 
Travis, George F & Lenore 
Trevelyan, Eoin & J Ann 
Trippe, Blair Landau 
Troisi, Eugene A. 
Troisi, Ferdinand & Mary 
Tryder, Michael & Maureen 
Tsai, H & Perkins, Jacqueline 
Tse, Joseph & Julia 
Tunnell, Raymond & Suzanne 
Turano, Anthony & Florence 
Turner, James & Mildred 
Turowski, Edmund/ Josephine 
Tyler, Priscilla D. 
Tyler, Watson, Heirs of 
Tylko, John J. 



Ullman, Steven & Amy 
Umbrello, Francis & Virginia 
Umbro, Paul & Diane 
Upham, Tamara 
Uretsky, Joseph & Harriet 
Urion, David & Deborah C. 
Urner, Joseph & Lorian B. 
Ury, William L. 



Vagliano, Andre & Leslie 
Vale, Lawrence & Julia D. 
Valles, Cynthia/Hebard, Geo. 
Valley Pond Corporation 
VanDam, Faythe & David S. 
VanLeer, Hans & Mary 
VanLeer, Hans /Karl /Katherine 
VanLeer, R. Karl & Rachel 
VanLeer, Rachel D. 
VanVleck, Mary 
Vanguard Savings Bank 



290,500 


$ 3,683.54 


273,300 


3,465.44 


363,300 


4,606.64 


541,600 


6,867.49 


540,400 


6,852.27 


730,000 


9,256.40 


100,200 


1,270.54 


419,500 


5,319.26 


206,300 


2,615.88 


279,400 


3,542.79 


356,200 


4,516.62 


268,100 


3,399.51 


245,700 


3,115.48 


232,900 


3,953.17 


194,000 


2,459.92 


314,000 


3,981.52 


391,300 


4,961.68 


83,300 


1,119.64 


355,600 


4,509.01 


582,300 


7,383.56 


266,100 


3,374.15 


172,600 


2,188.57 


855,000 


10,841.40 


537,600 


6,816.77 


329,300 


4,175.52 


374,200 


4,744.86 


196,900 


2,496.69 


531,300 


6,736.88 


492,400 


6,243.63 


384,000 


4,869.12 


330,600 


4,192.01 


721,300 


9,146.08 


424,100 


5,377.59 


176,100 


2,232.95 


51,200 


649.22 


106,400 


1,349.15 


4,500 


57.06 


4,200 


53.26 


509,600 


6,461.73 


168,400 


2,135.31 


237,900 


3,016.57 


206,600 


2,619.69 



239 



VALUATION LIST, 


JULY 1, 1992 


ji 




Aggregate Value 


Real Estate]! 




Real Estate 


Tax 


Vataha, Randel & Deborah 


$ 490,200 


$ 6,215.74 


Venier, Anthony & Catherine 


642,500 


8,146.90 J 


Vercollone, Carl R. 


528,900 


6,706.45 


Vercollone, Edmund & Julia 


263,600 


3,342.45 ] 


Verma, Dharraendra/K. Sinclair 


279,600 


3,545.33 J 


Vet, Maria F. 


287,400 


3,644.23 


Vitale, Joseph & Christine 


306,200 


3,882.62 J 


Vogt, Mary and Frances 


151,700 


1,923.56 1 


VonMertens, Peter & Page 


438,200 


5,556.38 1 


W. B. & T. Realty Corp. 


1,002,300 


12,709.16 | 


Wadsworth, Virginia D. 


341,800 


4,334.02 Ji 


Wales, Philip & Roger 


160,700 


2,037.68 I 


Wales, R Langdon & Ruth 


418,700 


5,309.12 || 


Walker, John & Joan 


445,800 


5,652.74 ! 



Walker, Roger S. 272,100 3,450.23 

Walker, Sidney A. 503,900 6,389.45 

Walker, Steven J. Tr. 6,300 79.88 

Wallace, Deborah E. 393,100 4,984.51 

Wallroth, Donald & Eln Gay 580,400 7,359.47 

Wallwork, Edwin & Janice 300,900 3,815.41 

Walsh, Patricia R. 208,800 2,647.58 

Walter, C. & R./Hoyt, W. & P. 623,700 7,908.52 

Wang, An & Lorraine 1,149,000 14,569.32 

Wang, Chiu-Chen & Pauline 490,700 6,222.08 

Wang, Frederick A. 161,500 2,047.82 

Wang, Thomas & Jacqueline 466,300 5,912.68 

Warbler Springs Corp. 1,529,000 19,387.70 

Warbler Springs Rd. Trust 41,000 519.88 

Ward Jr, Walter & Marie 263,800 3,344.98 

Ward, Francis & Karen J. 219,600 2,784.53 

Ward, Jane L. 229,800 2,913.86 

Warner, Patricia R. 239,000 3,030.52 

Warren, Duncan & Helen 291,600 3,697.49 

Warren, Joan B. 215,000 2,726.20 

Watkinson, Peter & Fannie 596,800 7,567.42 

Watson, John & Gay V. 461,600 5,853.09 

Waugh, John S. 402,900 5,108.77 

Webb, Heidi R. 501,500 6,359.02 

Webb, Robert H. & Sonia 446,600 5,662.89 

Webster, David & Winifred 525,100 6,658.27 

Wechsler, Joel & Josephine 352,600 4,470.97 

Weigel, Lynn & Irene 627,300 7,954.16 

Weigel, Lynn/Keevil, Charles 577,800 7,326.50 

Weinberg, Arnold & Inge 265,800 3,370.34 



240 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1992 



Weisgall, Deb. /Wilder, Throop 
Weisman, Rodger & Pamela 
Welch, Michael & Claire 
Welch, Nathaniel & Debra 
Welch, Vernon, Tr. 
Wells, Benjamin & Carol B. 
Wengren, Richard et al 

(West, Shari A. 

j Westcott , Vernon & Mary 

j Weston Rd Realty Trust 

IWhalen, William & Mary 

j What ley, Robert & Kay 

i Wheeler, Bella C. 

i Whinston, Michael & Bonnie H 

i White, Arnetta & Hope 

(White, Charles F. & Bonnie 

! White, Christopher A. 

i White, Elinor/Grossbart , S. 

j White, James & Carol 

(White, John & Gina 

| White, John & Katharine 

I White, Robert & Marion 

i Whiteside, Elinor I. 

i Whiting, Marjorie M. 

i Whitman, Lawrence & Joanne 

i Whitman, Virginia R. 

iWien, Joel H & Fran L. 

IWiggin, Richard & Agnes 
Wilbor, Anne E. 

j Wiley, David & Mary 

| Wilf ert , Fred & Eleanor 

| Willemin, Julian & Jane 
Williams, John & Anne 
Williams, Jr. Edwin & Ruth 
Williams, Pamela M. 
Williams, William & Gertrud 
Willmann, Werner & Margaret 
Wilson, Donald & Cheryl 
Wilson, Douglas & Pamela 
Wilson, Loretta E. 
Wilson, Robert A. & Jean 
Wilson, Robert/ Freligh, Eliz. 
Winchell, Frederick/ Theresa M 
Winchell, Gordon & Enid 
Winchell, Guilbert & Amy 
Winchell, Richard & Martha 



Aggregate Value 


Real Estate 


Real Estate 


Tax 


$ 599,000 


$ 7,595.32 


964,700 


12,232.40 


119,900 


1,520.33 


442,000 


5,604.56 


246,700 


3,128.16 


413,800 


5,246.98 


66,600 


844.49 


103,900 


1,317.45 


222,800 


2,825.10 


227,500 


2,844.70 


216,200 


2,741.42 


221,600 


2,809.89 


282,100 


3,577.03 


746,100 


9,460.55 


145,300 


1,842.40 


162,900 


2,065.57 


425,100 


5,390.27 


259,500 


3,290.46 


886,500 


11,240.82 


511,800 


6,489.62 


308,100 


3,906.71 


316,700 


4,015.76 


239,000 


3,030.52 


212,900 


2,699.57 


469,700 


5,955.80 


649,100 


8,230.59 


563,200 


7,141.38 


521,800 


6,616.42 


850,200 


10,780.54 


428,900 


5,438.45 


266,500 


3,379.22 


254,900 


3,232.13 


296,000 


3,753.28 


309,900 


3,929.53 


478,000 


6,061.04 


270,600 


3,431.21 


509,200 


6,456.66 


407,900 


5,172.17 


272,700 


3,457.84 


246,700 


3,123.16 


223,000 


2,827.64 


100,200 


1,270.54 


314,500 


3,987.86 


466,700 


5,917.76 


443,800 


5,627.38 


345,600 


4,382.21 



241 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1992 



Winship, Lee & Joyce 

Winship, Thomas & Elizabeth 

Winthrop, Sara J. 

Witherby, Marianne J. 

Wojno, James A. 

Wolf, Robert & Bryce 

Wolff, James & Carol 

Wolff, Robert L & Caroline L 

Wolfsberg, James & Sonia 

Woll, Edward & Barbara 

Wong, Judith/Myers, Larry 

Woo, Robert & Lillian 

Woo, Way Dong & Emily 

Wood, Hilve/Walter Wood, Exec 

Wood, Nancy 

Wood, Ronald & Wendy 

Wood, Virginia S. 

Woodington, Mary L. 

Woodward, John & Pamela 

Wright, Andrew & Greta 

Wu, Michael M. 

Wu, Pei-Rin & Susan 

Wyatt, Peter & Janice 

Wyman, Michael & Kathleen 



Yagjian, Jacob & Inez 
Yamron, Joseph & Joan 
Yates, Nancy C. 
Yates, William & M Paige 
Yi, Cheng- Ying & Jen Hua 
Yore, George & Kathleen 
Yos, Jerrold & Ann 
Young , Anne 
Young, G Stewart 
Young, Lee & Jane 
Young, Robin & Laurie 
Yu, Sheng Hsiung & Chang 



Zee, Molly B. 
Ziefert, Harriet 
Zimmerman, Herbert E. 
Zock, Robt. /Bennett, P., Tr; 
Zuelke, Laurence & Nancy 



Aggregate Value 


Real Estate 


Real Estate 


Tax 


$ 366,300 


$ 4,644.68 


689,300 


8,740.32 


103,700 


1,314.92 


230,100 


2,917.67 


162,900 


2,065.57 : 


275,600 


3,494.61 


379,100 


4,806.99 


973,400 


12,342.71 j 


307,000 


3,892.76 i 


245,500 


3,112.94 I 


328,500 


4,165.38 ; 


318,500 


4,038.58 


341,200 


4,326.42 


322,700 


4,091.81 


285,900 


3,625.21 


300,600 


3,811.61 ! 


157,800 


2,000.90 


319,600 


4,052.53 


569,300 


7,218.72 J 


599,100 


7,596.59 i 


219,700 


2,785.80 


363,800 


4,612.91 


287,500 


3,645.50 


313,200 


3,971.31 


25,400 


322.07 


548,900 


6,960. 03 


207,900 


2,636.17 j 


160,700 


2,037.68 i 


312,000 


3,956.16 


137,900 


1,748.57 


218,700 


2,773.12 j 


651,100 


8,255.95 


422,000 


5,350.96 


403,500 


5,116.38 


267,400 


3,390.63 


1,059,000 


13,428.12 


272,700 


3,457.84 


537,200 


6,811.70 I 


8,500 


107.78 | 


406,700 


5,156.96 j 


293,000 


3,715.24 \ 



242 



Cover - Drawing by 

Andrew Frost 
Third Grade 
Hartwell School 



REPORT 
of the 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

of the 

TOWN OF LINCOLN 

FOR THE YEAR 
1993 - 1994 




LINCOLN, MASSACHUSETTS 



LINCOLN FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Robert H. Adkins 

Rosamond P. Delori 

Rainer L. C. Frost 

Wilson C. Hayes 

Marcia A. Roehr 

Alvin L. Schmertzler 

Peter C. Sugar, Chairman 



COVER: Drawing by 

Andrew Frost 
3rd Grade 
Hartwell School 



REPORT 
of the 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

of the 

TOWN OF LINCOLN 

FOR THE YEAR 
1993 - 1994 



LINCOLN, MASSACHUSETTS 



REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE 
1993 - 1994 

CONTENTS 

I. Introduction 
II. Overview 
III. Revenue Estimates 

A. Tax Levy 

B. Non-Tax Revenues 

C. Taxation 

D. Free Cash 

E. Tax-Shift 

IV. Operating Budgets 

A. Salaries 

B. Expenses 

C. Summary 

D. Education 

1. Elementary Schools 

2. Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School 

3. Minuteman Vo-Tech High School 

E. Department of Public Works 

F. Water Department 

G. Conservation Commission 
H. Library 

I. Debt 

J. Pensions and Insurance 

V. Proposition 2 1/2 Budget and FY95 Projections 

VI. Five-Year Capital Plan 

VII. School Building Project 

VIII. Conclusion 

Exhibits 



REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE 
1993-1994 

I. INTRODUCTION 

The national and state economies have shown only modest 
improvements since last year - which reflects equally on our local 
communities. The budget process has never been easy - and never more 
so than in these times. As in the previous year, the Finance 
Committee started its work on the current budget as soon as FY92 drew 
to a close. 

After the failed override last year, we came to the conclusion 
that a different approach was necessary if we were to reach a 
satisfactory conclusion by Town Meeting in March this year. We, 
therefore, requested all Town Boards and Committees to consider 
budgets with a maximum increase of 3% and, at the same time, provide 
the Finance Committee with an additional wish list indicating 
necessary and desirable expenditures in order of preference. We would 
take these lists and consolidate them with a view of arriving at a 
final list of appropriations including warrant articles. We had 
further determined that we would go to Town Meeting with two budgets - 
one with no override and one with a possible override should this seem 
desirable. 

At the same time we decided to hold a series of forums to enable 
citizens of Lincoln to express their views and provide input to the 
budget process. We held three such meetings - one in June 1992 at the 
start of our endeavors, one in September and one early in January. 
All were well attended, and at each meeting the Finance Committee made 
presentations of the current status of the budget process at the time 
and listened to the views of the attendees. The objective behind our 
approach was the intent to provide Town Meeting with budget 
alternatives. Citizens would thus have the opportunity to come to a 
conclusion on some clear choices in order that, once the vote has been 
taken at Town Meeting and the following Monday at the ballot box, 
there would be no need to continue Town Meeting as had to be done last 
year. This process culminated with the statutory Budget Hearing on 
March 18, 1993. 

The Finance Committee believes that the process we have followed 
this year is a good one. It allowed us to build a budget from the 
ground up rather than having to look at cuts at the last minute to 
achieve our goals. It allowed all Boards and Committees to present to 
us their most essential needs and their preferences. Thanks to good 
management at Town Hall and some good fortune - for example, State Aid 
which appears to be level funded from last year - we are able to 
present a budget for FY94 with only a modest average tax increase and 
with no required override. The following pages will explain in detail 
what we have accomplished. 



II. OVERVIEW 

The Finance Committee recommends an operating budget of 
$12,546,132.15 for FY94, an increase of $533,037.26 or 4.4% over 
FY93. This budget does not include the warrant articles. Debt 
service has decreased by $94,650.00. Increases include $218,498 
(5.6%) for the Lincoln Elementary Schools, $76,027.26 (7.5%) for L/S 
High School and Vo-Tech assessments and $47,245 (13.4%) for the 
Library. The Conservation Commission budget is virtually at the same 
level as it was last year. There are no further personnel cuts 
proposed from last year which is noteworthy in this economic climate. 

The budget contains certain fixed costs. These include debt 
service, pensions, health and insurance costs. Debt service has 
decreased; pensions and health have increased; insurance has declined 
slightly. The combined effect of the fixed costs is a decrease of 
$79,155 (2.6%). The main factor in this is the level of health 
insurance: the same as last year which is indeed remarkable! Fixed 
costs will continue to be of concern in future budget years , 
especially health care, where the national picture is very pessimistic 
and which is an issue which will surely have to be addressed not only 
at a local but also at a national level. 

III. REVENUE ESTIMATES 

The net estimated revenues for FY94 are $14,070,820.30, up from 
$13,108,194.67 by $962,625.63 from FY93 - or 7.3%. This increase is 
made up primarily of: a) State Aid estimated to be $800,000; b) An 
increase in estimated local receipts of $388,850.48; and c) A 
recommendation to use $1,000,000 from Free Cash (see a more detailed 
review of Free Cash later in this report). The Selectmen and the 
Finance Committee took a hard look at local receipts to try and arrive 
at an estimate echoing more closely the actual trends and, thereby, 
ensuring that the turnbacks to Free Cash at the end of the year will 
not be excessive. It should also be noted that in the revenues are 
included contributions for the Flint Field purchase of $310,000.00. 
This is the last year of these pledges, and this will have a dramatic 
effect on the budget for FY95. 

Here follows a detailed explanation of the budget together with 
appropriate tables and charts. 



I 7,593 
147 


$ 8,533 
80 


$ 8,830 
100 


1,051 
585 


1,128 


990 


$ 9,338 (2) 


$ 9,706 (2) 


$ 9,920 


1,949 
689 


1,240 
681 


1,629 
800 


510 

947 

$13,433 


891 

891 

$13,409 


1,000 

1,075 

$14,424 


i (271) 


$ (301) 


$ (354) 



TABLE I 

Revenue Comparisons FY92, 93, and 94 - (OOP's) 
(See also Charts I & II) 



Revenues FY92 FY93 FY94 

(Actual) (Recap) (1) (Projected) 



Levy Limit 

New Construction 

Excluded Debt 

Override 

Tax Levy 

Local Receipts 

State Aid 

Free Cash 

Other Available Funds 



Total Assessments 

Net Available Revenues $13,162 $13,108 $14,070 

(1) Taken from the 1993 Recapitulation Sheet filed with the State by 
the Assessors in order to calculate the tax rate which has to be 
certified by the Department of Revenue. 

(2) The tax levy was less ($37,859.36 in FY92, $36,042.27 in FY93) 
than the maximum allowable. 

A. Tax Levy 

The tax levy is set by the Assessors after the Appropriations (to 
cover anticipated expenditures) are voted at Town Meeting. The 
Appropriations represent monies to fund the various Town services, 
while the tax levy contributes to the revenues required to pay for 
these services. While there are some non-tax revenues which the Town 
can count on, in years where there is a gap between all revenue 
sources and the Appropriations voted at Town Meeting, this gap has to 
be bridged by the approval of an override, the amount of which is set 
by the Selectmen. We had an override of $585,000 in FY92. Last year 
the Town failed to approve an override. The Town is considering a 
School Building project this year. If the architects' fees are 
borrowed, there will be no need for an override; if they are paid in 
cash, an override will be required. On the other hand, it should be 
noted that the Town, together with all other Massachusetts 
communities, cannot get by without overrides if we are to maintain the 



services the citizens have come to expect. Based on our projections, 
there will be a need for an override in FY95. Foremost in all budget 
considerations has to be the concern that no undue tax burdens be 
placed on the citizenry. 

B. Non-Tax Revenues 

Non-tax revenues are estimated to be higher than they were in 
FY93. There are two reasons for this. First, as touched upon 
earlier, we took a hard look at the various sources of revenue and, in 
concurrence with the Selectmen, have concluded that it was reasonable 
to increase the estimates. This is both because averaging the 
historical precedents allowed us to do this, and because we felt that 
the estimates should be less conservative to better manage the 
turnbacks at the end of the fiscal year. It should be kept in mind 
that the Town's budget line items cannot be exceeded nor can transfers 
be made from one line item to another. If estimated too low and the 
amount requested for any line item is inadequate (unless this is an 
emergency when it can be covered by the Reserve Fund), it cannot be 
replenished before the end of the year, except at a Special Town 
Meeting. 

The second reason is State Aid. We believe that it is reasonable 
to expect State Aid for FY94 to remain at the same level as it was in 
FY93. Added to this amount is an additional Cherry Sheet distribution 
received in FY93 of close to $113,000. We expect to receive a similar 
distribution in FY94. 

Both the Finance Committee and the Selectmen are continuing to 
look for additional revenue sources. Some of these are long-term. 
Others, which have been explored, were contributions from tax-exempt 
foundations and institutions. Unfortunately, the Town was not 
successful in this area though the Selectmen made a valiant effort in 
meeting with all the parties concerned. 

C. Taxation 

The general level of taxation has kept pace with the inflation 
rate on a long-term basis though there have been years in the recent 
past when tax levies have had substantial increases. If our 
recommendation for a no override budget is passed by the Town, the tax 
levy this year will increase by only 2.2%, though, as has been stated 
earlier, there are certainly going to be years ahead when we can 
expect our taxes to increase by 5-6% annually. Future increases will 
depend in large measure on the services the Town will demand and vote 
for. 

Planning is the key. The Finance Committee continues to examine 
budgets looking ahead one to two years at a time and taking into 
consideration capital plans the various Town Boards and Committees 
prepare in response to our requests. Our intent is to hold periodic 
open discussions with the citizens to hear their views and receive 



their input for the establishment and modification of the Town's 
long-term policies. 

D. Free Cash 

Free Cash is, in reality, the turnbacks which result from 
budgetary surpluses in various budget line items, together with 
additional and unforeseen revenues. These monies are certified by the 
State in the fall of each year for use in a future budget. The Free 
Cash policy has been somewhat vague in the past. It was the Finance 
Committee's intent to try to establish a more coherent policy based on 
better reasoning. We had several discussions with the Selectmen on 
this point. We also researched the matter with bond rating agencies 
and some financial institutions. As a result, we now have a policy in 
place with a better ability to sustain it over the long haul. 

It Is our view that there should be an amount of reserve kept in 
Free Cash approximately equal to 5% of the operating budgets. We 
believe that such an amount is sufficient to maintain the Town's 
excellent bond rating which helps Lincoln whenever a capital project 
needs to be bonded. Our current bond rating is Aal. 

Last fall, the amount of Free Cash certified was $1,837,741. 
Based on this figure we are proposing to hold back a minimum of 5% of 
the operating budget (at least $650,000) and use approximately 
$1,000,000 for the operating budget and warrant articles. Some of 
these funds will be earmarked for capital projects and some for other 
appropriations. (For the amounts of Free Cash certified, used and 
retained on a year-to-year basis, see Table II. See also Charts III & 
IV.) 



FY 


Amount 

CERTIFIED 

$ 535,751 

600,284 

866,079 

1,093,858 

1,531,461 

1,837,741 


TABLE II 

of Free Cash 

EXPENDITURES 
$ 435,751 
452,000 
600,000 
510,000 
890,797 
1,000,000 


Used 

BALANCE 
$100,000 
148,284 
266,079 
583,858 
197,077 
837,741 


% 


07/01/87 
07/01/88 
07/01/89 
07/01/90 
07/01/91 
07/01/92 


1.0% 
1.4% 
2.4% 
4.8% 
5.2% 
6.1% 



E. Property Tax Shift 

This topic was addressed by both the Finance Committee and the 
Selectmen last year. The idea behind a property tax shift is the 
ability to apply a different/higher tax rate to commercial property 
than to residential property. It is the Assessors who establish the 
amount which could be shifted in accordance with the law, and it is 
the Selectmen who can put this into effect if they so choose. 

Last year the Selectmen expressed a willingness to give this 
matter some consideration. They held two hearings, one last spring 
and another last fall. At the latter, they listened to the views of 
the Town's taxpayers, both residential and commercial. After the 
hearing the Selectmen decided that it was not productive to put the 
tax shift in place at this time, primarily because only marginal 
benefits would be realized by any homeowner versus the much greater 
proportional burden being placed on a commercial property. See Table 
III. 

IV. OPERATING BUDGETS (000's) 

The operating budget which the Finance Committee supports for FY94 
is £12,546,132.15. To arrive at this budget, as already explained 
above, we requested all Town Boards and Committees to start with an 
approximate 3% increase above FY93 levels and to submit a prioritized 
list of additional items, including warrant articles, for 
consideration. 

We are fortunate in being able to report that this year the Town 
will be able to have an operating budget which generally represents 
level services when compared to FY93. We can also accomplish this 
within a no override budget, though we must re-emphasize that it is 
highly unlikely that a similar scenario will prevail in years ahead. 
Factors which influence the outcome are the amount of available 
revenues, the amount of anticipated State Aid, fixed costs (health 
care, Insurance, pensions and debt service) and the demand for 
services by the citizens. 

In addition, enrollment is on the rise at both the Elementary 
Schools and the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School, and this has a 
direct effect on the education budgets, as discussed below. Another 
factor is the aging buildings of our Town with the need for certain 
unavoidable maintenance and restoration work ahead and, in the case of 
our schools, an upgrade of the buildings to current code and 
educational standards. This will be a subject for discussion under 
the warrant articles. 

The need for an override is, as we have already indicated, an 
outgrowth of Proposition 2 1/2. Whether there should be an override 
or not in any given year depends on the amount of revenues needed to 
accomplish all that the Town determines it requires. As we proposed 



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after last year's Town Meeting and have restated at our several public 
meetings, an override should be discussed at Town Meeting. We intend 
to do this in the context of some of the warrant articles. 

TABLE IV 

Distribution of Budget - Comparisons 

FY92, '93, and • 94 (000's) 

(See also Charts V & VI) 

FY92 FY93 FY94 % 
(Actual) (Recap ) (Proposed) Inc/(Dec) 



General Government (1) 


$ 910 


$ 901 


$ 956 


6.1 


Public Safety (2) 


1,375 


1,411 


1,438 


1.9 


Health & Sanitation (3) 


129 


136 


142 


4.4 


Public Works 


906 


856 


932 


8.9 


Library 


358 


354 


401 


13.3 


Recreation 


171 


182 


189 


3.8 


Housing Commission 


21 


37 


37 


0.0 


Other 


31 


38 


38 


0.0 


Debt Service 


1,469 


1,375 


1,280 


(6.9) 


Pensions 


375 


456 


488 


7.0 


Employee Health Ins. 


972 


972 


973 


0.0 


Prop. & Indem. Ins. 


290 


248 


231 


(6.9) 


Elementary School 


$3,620 


$3,889 


4,107 


5.6 


LSRHS & Vo-Tech 


959 


1,008 


1,084 


7.5 


Reserve Fund 


150 


150 


250 


66.7 


Total Budget Expenses 


$11,736 


$12,013 


$12,546 


4.4 


Budget Total Without 










Elementary Schools 


$ 8,116 


$ 8,124 


$ 8,439 


3.9 



Notes: 

(1) Includes Town Offices, Conservation, Assessors. 

(2) Includes Police, Fire, Ambulance, Communications, Building 

Department. 

(3) Includes Board of Health, Council on Aging. 



A. Salaries 

Salaries are a major item for both the Town and School budgets. 
Cost of living raises for employees are part of the year-to-year 
salary increases. Step increases, as well as longevity increases, are 
also given annually to those employees who qualify under terms 
contained in the Personnel Board's guidelines. Contract negotiations 
with some Town employees are currently underway and not all have been 
settled at the time of this report. 

Table V below details all salary line items other than those for 
School personnel. Please note the FY94 figures in the Table include 
only the step and longevity increases of $93,000 (3.3% of the FY94 
increase) for those employees who have qualified. The estimated 
$85,000 (3% of the FY94 increase) to cover the cost of living raises 
for all Town employees (exclusive of School personnel) is contained in 
a separate warrant article to be voted at Town Meeting. The total 
salary increase of $178,000 is up 6.3% for FY94. 

TABLE V 

Distribution of Town Salaries 

(000* s omitted/rounded) 

(See also Charts V & VI) 



Expended Appropriation^) Proposed(4) % 
1992 1993 1994 Inc/(Dec) 



Salaries 
















Town Offices 


$ 


506 


$ 


528 


$ 541 




2.5 


Conservation 




106 




87(1) 


89 




2.3 


Assessors 




31 




61(2) 


71 




16.4 


Police 




530 




549 


563 




2.6 


Fire 




481 




500 


513 




2.6 


Ambulance 




17 




17 


17 




0.0 


Communicat ions 




108 




112 


113 




0.9 


Building Dept. 




66 




70 


72 




2.9 


Board of Health 




60 




66 


67 




1.5 


Council on Aging 




44 




47 


48 




2.1 


Public Works 




380 




375(1) 


378 




0.8 


Library 




269 




276 


302(3) 


9.4 


Recreation 




125 




135 


142 




5.2 


TOTAL 


$2 


,723 


$2,823 


$2,916 




3.3% (4) 












85 


(COL Increase) 












$3,001 




6.3% 



Notes : 

(1) This figure reflects reductions of positions in FY93. There are 
no additions/reductions of positions proposed for FY94. 

(2) A new position of Assistant Assessor for FY93 was approved at the 
1992 annual Town Meeting. 

(3) Includes return of one employee from maternity leave plus 
increased hours for the Library. 

(4) Figures in this column include only step and longevity increases. 
Estimated $85,000 cost of living increases are included in a 

separate warrant article to be voted at Town Meeting. 

(5) Figures in this column include distributions from the pay raise 
article. 

B. Expenses 

Fixed costs are continuing essentially flat this year as they have 
done in FY93 (see Tables Vl-a and VI -b) . Debt service continues to 
decline. This is an area where the Town can control its expenditures 
and plan its future projects in an overall framework of desired 
services. On the other hand, pensions are a mandated cost, while 
insurance costs are determined by the marketplace. We must always 
keep in mind that fixed costs are also somewhat dictated by 
inflationary increases and we can expect these costs to rise in the 
coming years. 

TABLE Vl-a 

Fixed Costs (000' s) 



(See also Chart VII) 



% 
FY92 FY93 FY94 Inc/(Dec) 



Debt Service $ 1,469 

Middlesex County Pension 375 
Health and Insurance 972 
Prop, and Indem. Ins. 290 

TOTAL $ 3,106 $ 3,051 $ 2,972 (2.6) 



$ 1,375 


$ 1,280 


(6.9) 


456 


488 


7.0 


972 


973 


0.0 


248 


231 


(6.9) 



10 



TABLE Vl-b 



Non-School Expenses 


(000' 


s) 


FY94 




FY92 




FY93 




% 
Inc/(Dec) 


$ 238 


$ 


240 


$ 


255 


6.3 


167 




162 




160 


(1.2) 


26 




26 




28 


7.7 


517 




492 




554 


12.6 


101 




86 




99 


15.1 


45 




48 




47 


(2.1) 


15 




15 




15 


0.0 


38 




60 




60 


0.0 


$1,147 


$1,129 


$1,218 


7.9 


150 




150 




250 


66.7 



General Government 

Public Safety 

Health and Sanitation 

Public Works 

Library 

Recreation 

Cemetery 

Unclassified 

Subtotals 

Reserve Fund* 

TOTALS* $1,297 $1,279 $1,468 14.8 

* It should be noted that one of the main reasons for the increases 
in the non-school expenses is the recommendation of the Finance 
Committee to increase the Reserve Fund from $150,000 to $250,000. 
The Reserve Fund exists to cover unanticipated emergency 
expenditures during any fiscal year. We are proposing the 
increase due to the fact that for the past two years we had to 
request an additional appropriation to replenish this fund - 
$37,000 was requested at the Town Meeting last year and $30,000 is 
being requested this year. The Finance Committee believes it more 
prudent to start with a larger fund and avoid the additional 
request. In addition, the Finance Committee agreed with the 
School Committee that it will approve a transfer in FY94 for an 
additional Grade I section next September should enrollment 
increases require this expenditure. 

C. Summary 

Table VII below shows a summary of the Appropriations, with an 
increase of $533,037.26 for Fiscal Year 1994 when compared to Fiscal 
Year 1993. Of this amount, $294,525.26, the largest dollar increase, 
is generated by the Schools. This reflects the commitment of the Town 
of Lincoln, supported by the Finance Committee, to maintain the 
quality of education in the face of increasing enrollments. Further 
support is expressed by some of the Warrant Articles this year in the 
areas of the School Building Project at the Elementary Schools and in 
technology, discussed below. 



11 





TABLE VII 








Appropria 


ttions (000' 


s) 






FY92 


FY93 


FY94 


$ / % 
Inc/(Dec) 


Non-School Salaries 
Fixed Costs 
Non-School Expenses 
Schools 


$ 2,754 
3,106 
1,297 
4,579 


$ 2,787 
3,052 
1,278 
4,896 


$ 2,915 
2,972 
1,468 
5,191 


$123 - 4.6 
(80)-(2.6) 
190 -14.9 
295 - 6.0 


TOTAL 


$11,736 


$12,013 


$12,546 


$533 4.4 


D. Education 











The proposed Fiscal Year 1994 total budget for education in all 
Lincoln Schools is $5,190,981.65, up $294,525.26 or 6% from FY93. 
Table VIII shows the breakdown for the three schools. 



TABLE 


VIII 






Education Budgets (000' 


s) 




FY92 


FY93 


FY94 


Change 
Amount % 


Elementary $3,620 
Lincoln-Sudbury Regional 886 
Vo-Tech 73 


$3,889 
899 
109 


$4,107 

1,002 

81 


$218 5.6 
103 11.5 
(28) (25.7) 


1. Elementary Schools 









In line with the Finance Committee guidelines, the School 
Committee first presented a budget representing a 2.7% increase 
($102,247) over its Fiscal Year 1993 budget of $3,888,801. This 
amount comprises salary increases equal to $123,380, as required by 
the Schools' contractual commitments, offset by line item reductions 
in other areas aggregating slightly more than $20,000. 

The School Committee also indicated an urgent need, arising from 
enrollment increases, for additional sections in Grades 1, 3 and 8. 
The cost of these increases was forecast to be, respectively, Grade 
One: $41,748 (+1.1%); Grade Three: $43,007 (+1.1%); and Grade 
Eight: $72,166 (+1.9%). After discussion and joint review, the 
School Committee agreed that the additional section for Grade One may 
not be required and the School Committee voted a budget of $4,107,299, 
representing an increase of 5.6% [(2.7%) + (63:1.1%) + (G8:1.9%)]. 
The Finance Committee agreed to approve a transfer from the Reserve 
Fund to fund an additional Grade One section due to enrollment 
increases, if required. 



12 



It was clear to the Finance Committee that the Elementary School 
Budget had been carefully set to the minimum level at which an 
acceptable level of services could be provided. On this basis, the 
Finance Committee fully supports a Fiscal Year 1994 Elementary School 
Budget of $4,107,299, representing a 5.6% (+$218,498) increase over 
Fiscal Year 1993. Of this amount, 2.9% represents the cost of 
enrollment increases. 

2. Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School 

The High School has presented a level service budget which 
represents a 6.43% increase in its total budget from $9,220,443 in the 
current 1993 fiscal year to $9,812,879. (After the High School budget 
is adjusted to exclude insurance and benefit costs and debt service on 
capital projects, none of which is included in the Elementary Schools 
budget, the High School budget represents an increase of 6.61%.) This 
budget accommodates an unexpected enrollment increase of 54 students 
(a 6.4% increase) for the current school year and a further projected 
increase of at least 30 students for the upcoming 1994 fiscal year. 

Major increases are (approximately) $360,000 in salaries (step 
increases and a 3.5% increase which faculty and staff agreed last year 
to defer to this year); $131,000 for 2.75 full time equivalent (FTE) 
teaching positions and tutors and library aides to cover the increased 
enrollment (a portion of these expenses is being funded in the current 
fiscal year from a one-time grant from the State); $25,000 to restore 
instructional supplies to the spending level in the 1992 fiscal year; 
$31,000 in debt service (the initial interest due on the boiler 
replacement program approved by the Town last year); $43,000 for 
health insurance; and $45,000 for two teacher retirement incentives. 

These increases are offset by savings of (approximately) $101,000 
in tuition and transportation for special education outside of the 
High School and $25,000 in social security contributions arising from 
a change to a State retirement plan. 

This budget as proposed is the median between two other budgets 
also prepared by the High School, as requested by the Finance 
Committee - a budget limited to a 3% increase which eliminates the 
2.75 FTE additional positions noted above and makes a further 
reduction compared to the current budget of 3.75 FTE positions, and 
another budget representing a 7.94% increase, which includes 
(approximately) $53,000 for new computer equipment and related costs 
and $69,000 to rebuild the tennis courts and replace the emergency 
electricity generator. The Finance Committee recommends the middle 
(level service) budget as an appropriate balance between cost and 
essential service. 

After application of State Aid and savings from past budgets, 
Lincoln's share of the Fiscal Year 1994 budget will be $1,002,452.65, 



13 



an increase of 11.5%. Lincoln's share will increase by a higher 
percentage than the 6.4% increase in the total budget primarily 
because the State Aid and past budget savings available to pay a 
portion of the total budget have not increased at all. In addition, 
Lincoln's percentage share (which is based on average enrollments from 
Lincoln and Sudbury during the three years preceding the budget year) 
will increase slightly from 12.11% to 12.48%. 

Last year, Lincoln and Sudbury approved a capital replacement and 
improvement program at a total cost of approximately $2,100,000, 
including boiler replacement, repairs to exterior walls and renovation 
of electrical mains. Full debt service payments will commence in 
Fiscal Year 1995, but will be mitigated in part by the completion in 
Fiscal Year 1994 of debt service payments for earlier projects. 
Lincoln's share of this debt service in each year will be the same 
percentage as its share of the operating budget. 

3. Minuteman Vo-Tech High School 

The Vo-Tech School has presented a budget of $10,389,131 for 
Fiscal Year 1994, representing a 3.28% increase over its budget of 
$10,058,752 for the current 1993 fiscal year. The primary increases 
are (approximately) $179,000 in salaries and $139,000 for capital 
equipment acquisition. Income sources are expected to increase from 
$3,865,000 to $4,119,000, however, so that the total portion of the 
Vo-Tech School budget paid by the sixteen member towns will increase 
by only 1.23%. Lincoln's share of this amount will decline because of 
reduced enrollment from 1.76% to 1.30% so that Lincoln will enjoy a 
reduction in its assessment from $108,966 to $81,230 or 25.45%. 

As of the date of this report, the State legislature is debating 
an education reform package which could affect budgets and assessments 
for Fiscal Year 1994. Possible results include substantial increases 
in State Aid and a requirement that each town increase its funding of 
its regional school districts by at least 3% over the previous fiscal 
year. Because the terms and fate of this legislation are presently 
uncertain, the foregoing budgets do not attempt to anticipate Its 
effects. 

E. Department of Public Works 

During the past year, the Department of Public Works was reduced, 
through attrition, by the equivalent of one full-time position, the 
intended result of previously approved staff reductions. 

By carefully deploying the personnel of three coordinated 
departments - Public Works, Water and Conservation - it was possible 
to maintain nearly all of the previous year's levels of service. The 
reduced staffing levels did mean that non-emergency issues were dealt 
with in a prioritized basis and certain tasks were completed later 
than would have been the case with the prior staffing level. Note 



that the main reason for the increase in the Department of Public 
Works budget is an increase in the trash tipping fees the Town has to 
pay of $63,000. If the Town approves the purchase of the trash truck 
(the subject of a warrant article), it is our understanding that 
existing personnel will operate the vehicle and that certain tasks may 
be delayed somewhat more than currently. 

F. Water Department 

The Water Department funds all capital projects and operating 
budgets through water fees. The capital requirements for Fiscal Year 
1994 are projected to be $450,000 in order to fund the first year cash 
needs for the contact chamber/filtration system to be located at 
Flints' Pond and required by the Federal Clean Water Act. The Water 
Commission expects the total cost of this capital project to be 
$1,410,000. During Fiscal Year 1994, the Town will borrow $960,000 to 
pay the balance of the cost of the project. Principal and interest 
due on this borrowing will be repaid from Water Department receipts 
during Fiscal Years 1995, 1996 and 1997, to be covered by increasing 
water rates by 5% in each of the next few years. 

G. Conservation Commission 

The process of sharing resources that was expanded this year among 
the three departments - Conservation, Public Works and Water - has 
been working quite well for the Conservation Commission's year-to-year 
maintenance projects. The Finance Committee commends the staffs of 
these departments for their cooperation and the efficiencies that have 
been introduced. 

'Lincoln Logs the Future' indicated that the conservation lands 
and the character they give the Town are near the top of the list of 
what most people value about Lincoln. Budget constraints have 
resulted in the deferment of some large restoration projects. These 
projects are the long-term result of heavy public usage of 
conservation land and are beyond the scope of the regular maintenance 
work. If these very sizable and valued Town assets are to be 
preserved, it will be necessary, in the near future, at the very least 
to begin to address these projects and plan for their implementation. 

H. Library 

Since the completion of the Library addition in 1989, circulation 
has increased 32% and attendance has increased 14% while staffing has 
decreased 15%, hours open have decreased 18% and the budget was cut by 
3.8%. In Fiscal Year 1994, the Finance Committee proposes to increase 
the Library budget by 13.4% over Fiscal Year 1993 levels. Raising 
last year's budget amount by $47,245 will result in an increase of 
$12,000 or 40% in the book budget and an increase of $12,370 for 
additional staff time and building expenses to allow the Library to 
remain open an additional four hours per week. It Is hoped 



15 



this partial reinstatement of book budget funds and hours open will 
restore the Library to a level of service closer to that which 
citizens have requested. 

I. Debt 

Debt service (the repayment of principal and interest on several 
outstanding bond issues) will continue to decline in Fiscal Year 1994, 
as no new projects have been started. As has been mentioned earlier, 
this is an area where the Town can exercise some control in long-term 
planning in the way it starts and brings on line new projects. Some 
projects can be handled out of operational budgets; others, because of 
their magnitude, require a bond issue. The Finance Committee has 
continued to request Town Boards and Departments to submit anticipated 
projects in order that we may plan their long-term effect on the 
budget. The intent is to avoid dramatic increases in the tax rate in 
any given year. 

Two projects which will have to be addressed in the coming years 
are the School Building Project at the Elementary Schools - see 
discussion below - and the Fire and Police Station Renovations 
Project, which was shelved some time ago but which the Town will have 
to examine closely in the very near future. 

J. Pensions and Insurance 

The pension and insurance budget for FY94 brings some relief from 
the major increases that have occurred over the past few years. 
Although there are overall increases of $82,245 in the budget, they 
will be offset by reductions of $66,750. Thus, the total budget for 
FY94 has been increased by only $15,495 or .9% (See also Table Vl-a on 
Fixed Costs). 

Work continues to try and find additional ways to further reduce 
the costs in these areas of the Town's budget. (The Selectmen have 
set up a Committee to examine insurance costs and what the Town could 
do to reduce these.) 

V. PROPOSITION 2 1/2 BUDGET AND FY95 PROJECTIONS 

As has been stated under the discussion on the Tax Levy, the 
Finance Committee is able to recommend a budget without an override 
this year - but, as also noted, the Town cannot get by without an 
override in most future years if it is to maintain a level of service 
similar to past service levels. 

The Levy Limit is arrived at by a formula created by Proposition 2 
1/2. It takes last year's Tax Levy, deducts the excluded debt and 
multiplies the result by 1.025 for this year's Levy Limit. Add to 
this the excluded debt (voted on in previous years) and any new 
construction, and the result will be this year's Tax Levy. 



16 



The Revenues and Appropriations/Expenditures are then estimated 
following discussions with all Town Boards, Departments and the 
citizens, not only to establish the desired levels for the various 
budgets, but also to look at certain unavoidable and/or desirable 
projects the Town wishes to, or has to, accomplish in the upcoming 
fiscal year. This process includes the warrant articles. Should 
there be inadequate available revenues, an override will be needed, 
since it is the only way to increase the revenues and pay for the 
expenditures voted by Town Meeting. 

At the Town Meeting last year the Finance Committee, together with 
the Selectmen, had proposed a Stabilization Fund to even out possible 
tax spikes in a future year. The citizens rejected this approach and 
also voted against the proposed override. 

The Finance Committee this year has prepared projections looking 
ahead for several years. What these projections show is that, while 
we are fortunate in FY94 not to be forced to have an override, 
overrides may indeed be required in the future - quite likely in FY95 
-see Table IX for the FY95 projection. 



17 



TABLE IX 

BUDGET PROJECTION 

(With no projects for FY95) 

(000's) 

FY94 FY95 

Levy Limit $ 8,829 $ 9,153 

New Construction (2) 100 104 

Excluded Debt (1) 990 1,053 
Override 

Tax Levy $ 9,919 $10,310 



Local Receipts (2) 


1,287 


1,338 


State Aid (3) 


800 


800 


Free Cash (4) 


1,000 


900 


Other Funds (5) 


625 


225 


Assessments (2) 


(354) 
$13,277 


(368: 


Net Revenue 


$13,205 


Town Expenditures (2) 


4,383 


4,558 


Debt Service (1) 


1,280 


1,053 


Pensions (6) 


488 


561 


Insurance (7) 


1,204 


1,385 


Elem. School (8) 


4,107 


4,312 


L/S-VoTech (9) 


1,084 


1,138 


Warrants (10) 






Total Expenses 


$12,546 


$13,007 


Aval. Funds (11) 


$ 731 


$ 198 


Tax Levy Increase 


2.20% 


3.94% 



Notes to Table IX: 

1. The consequence of debts assumed in prior years. 

2. Assumed to increase at 4% (figures do not include Water Department 
receipts or expenditures). 

3. State Aid is assumed to be level through FY95. 

4. Free Cash is assumed to drop gradually. 

5. Other funds will decrease dramatically in FY95 (no more Flint 
Field contributions). 

6. Assumed to increase at 15%. 

7. Assumed to increase at 15%. 

8. Assumed to increase at 5% through FY95. 

9. Assumed to increase at 5%. 

10. Warrant Articles depend on projects the Town wishes to put into 
place . 

11. Available Funds (for Warrant Articles and other services): They 
are at reasonable levels in FY94 and thus there is no need for an 
override; in FY95 these funds are lower. If Warrant Articles and 
other required projects remain at current levels, an override will 
be a necessity; and if the Town should begin the actual 
construction of the School Building project, an override will be 
unavoidable. 



18 



VI. FIVE-YEAR CAPITAL PLAN 

All departments continue to update their five-year capital plans 
while reviewing their current budgets. This information is then 
included in a consolidated table (see Table X) to control the timing 
of large capital projects and avoid unnecessarily large impacts on the 
budget in any given year. 

TABLE X 

Five Year Capital Plan (OOP's) 

FY94 FY95 FY96 FY97 FY98 
Elementary Schools 
Handicap Access 10 

(All other capital needs will be addressed as part of the 

School Building Project.) 

Conservation 



CLM Truck 





22 











Ranger Truck 








10 








Dump Truck 

















Mower 











25 





Land Acquisition 


(Unknown) 










Codman Bike Path 





25 











Library 












No capital needs anticipated. 










DPW 












Replace T. 0. Van 


16 














Replace Pickup Truck 

















Replace Case Tractor 





70 











Replace Sander 











8 





Road Improvements 


200 


80 


90 


100 


110 


Tank Removal Study 


38 














Pump Replacement 





20 











Police & Fire 













New Fire Engine 150 

New Police Vehicles 34 34 34 34 34 

Fire Station Renovation 750 

Town Bldg. Maintenance 40 70 35 35 35 

Water Department 1410 22 22 

Other projects depend on EPA and State 
requirements. 



19 



VII. SCHOOL BUILDING PROJECT 

For some time now it had been increasingly apparent that our 
Elementary Schools required the Town's attention. This not only 
necessitated taking a look at the state of the buildings - some as old 
as forty years - but also to examine the programmatic requirements of 
the Schools to bring them in line with current educational philosophy 
and state regulations. 

Work was begun last year by the School Building Committee and, 
under direction of the 1992 Town Meeting, has continued all through 
1992/1993. There will be a major presentation of the work at this 
year's Town Meeting. What is critical to note is that the Town of 
Lincoln has received a reimbursement rating from the State of 54% due 
to overcrowding at the Schools and the state of some of the 
buildings. Therefore, it is equally important for the Town to 
complete its plans as soon as possible and submit these to the State 
in order that we may potentially receive State Aid of 54% for 
renovation and repair of the school buildings. 

The architects' fees for preparation of all the drawings and 

documents are in excess of $500,000 for this phase of the work. The 

Finance Committee strongly supports this effort and urges all the 
citizens to vote approval of the funding required for this project. 

What is the best method for paying the architects' fees? The 
Selectmen have provided the following statement: 

"The Selectmen feel that the design fees for the school building 
project should be paid in cash rather than borrowed. This would 
necessitate an override of about $300,000. The reasons are: 

1. It Is the least expensive way. Interest costs add over 50% to the 
cost of the fees with no additional tangible benefit. 

2. Overrides and larger tax increases will be necessary in the future 
to support operating budgets. The no override budget proposed by 
the Finance Committee is arrived at not by cutting expenses but by 
borrowing. This will increase costs in future years. Having an 
override this year would smooth out and reduce the tax increases 
needed in the next few years and give the voters at the ballot box 
a chance to indicate their understanding of, and willingness to 
support, tax increases as the Town embarks on the school building 
project. 

3. There are technical and mechanical details which surround 
borrowing which make it more complicated than using cash. The 
architects must start work immediately after Town Meeting before 
the money to pay them can be borrowed and when construction 
documents are complete, there may be considerable time elapsed 
before construction begins. Paying cash prevents any unforeseen 
problems which might result from borrowing under these unusual 
circumstances . 



20 



In order to reach the $300,000 override, the Selectmen suggest 
reducing the Reserve Fund to the FY93 level of $150,000 and not buying 
the trash truck next year. The tax increase would be about 4.5% 
rather than the 1.3% increase for the no override budget." 

The Finance Committee does not agree with the Selectmen's 
position. Our reasons can be summarized as follows: 

1. We have stated earlier that all projects of substantial size 
require bonding. The School Building project is no exception. 
The Finance Committee believes that all costs of the project, 
including the architects' fees, should be part of the bonding. 
While a cash payment may be the least expensive method, it could 
only be achieved at this time by deleting certain other essential 
projects which the Finance Committee believes also have long-terra 
benefits. 

2. While we concur with the Selectmen's view that overrides will be 
necessary in the future, this is not the case this year. We 
believe that it is better not to raise taxes more than necessary 
in any given year. Monies thus retained by the taxpayer can be 
used for other purposes and can also be invested with the 
resulting interest becoming an offsetting benefit when compared to 
any tax increase. Smoothing out future tax increases, in reality, 
raises the tax levy in earlier years and creates a higher tax levy 
which will only become a future burden for the taxpayer. Voters 
will have ample opportunity to show their support for the school 
project - both at Town Meeting, where a two-thirds majority is 
required for any borrowing, and at the ballot box, where all debt 
exclusion has to be voted. 

3. Borrowing certainly has mechanical details which surround it, but 
the Town has been borrowing money for a variety of purposes for a 
long time. The technical details required to be followed are well 
known and their complications are a routine Town Hall deals with 
everyday. 

The Finance Committee wishes to avoid an override in FY94. We 
have produced a budget which covers all essential expenditures 
requested by the various Town Boards and Committees. Reducing the 
Reserve Fund to $150,000, in our opinion, could create potential 
emergency expenditures in FY94 which we may not be able to cover 
without having to return to the Town for additional funding. The 
trash truck, in our opinion, is an excellent proposal to be discussed 
later under the warrant articles and will save the Town substantial 
expenditures each year. Its purchase, therefore, should not be 
postponed. 



21 



VIII. CONCLUSION 

As must be clear to all of us, the state of the economy is still 
somewhat shaky - though there are certain hopeful signs. The years of 
economic slowdown have had their effect on the Town's finances. This 
meant that cuts had to be made, not only in services, but also, more 
painfully, in personnel. 

We are fortunate to be able to present a budget for FY94 with 
essentially level services when compared to FY93. Availability of 
revenues, some of these achieved by hard work and prudent management 
at Town Hall, make this possible. We have been guided by the 
following goals: to slow the erosion of the level of services the 
Town has come to expect and to continue to provide an excellent 
quality of education for our children - all to be accomplished within 
a minimum possible tax rate increase. 

The Finance Committee has made every attempt to keep the citizens 
informed of the status of our deliberations, and we believe we have 
been more successful in this than in years past. We have had good 
levels of cooperation with all of the Town's Boards and Committees 
and, in our opinion, this has had the direct effect of improving the 
budget process. 

We believe that the budget for Fiscal Year 1994 is a reasonable 
proposal and we urge the citizens of our Town to show their support by 
approving it at Town Meeting. 



22 



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40 



WARRANT 
1993 NOTICE 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, ss 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Lincoln in said County: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify the 
legal voters of said Town of Lincoln qualified to vote in Town Meeting 
for the transaction of Town Affairs to meet in the Brooks School 
Auditorium in said Lincoln on Saturday, the twenty-seventh day of 
March next, at 9:30 a.m., then and there to act on the following 
articles, except Article 1, and also to meet at the Smith School 
Gymnasium on Monday, the twenty-ninth day of March next, at 7:30 a.m., 
then and there to act on the following Article 1, by posting a copy of 
this Warrant, by you attested, in said Town, seven days at least 
before the twenty-seventh day of March next. 

The polls for voting the Australian ballot on Monday, March 
twenty-ninth, will be opened at 7:30 a.m. and will be closed at 8:00 
p.m. 



ARTICLE 1. To bring in their votes for one or more members for each 
of the following offices: 

Moderator for three years 

Town Clerk for one year 

Selectman for three years 

Treasurer for one year 

Assessor for three years 

School Committee member (2) for three years 

Water Commissioner for three years 

Board of Health member for three years 

Cemetery Commissioner for three years 

Cemetery Commissioner for one year 

Planning Board member for five years 

Planning Board member for four years 

Commissioner of Trust Funds for three years 

Trustee of Bemis Fund for three years 

DeCordova & Dana Museum and Park Trustee for four years 

Recreation Committee member for three years 

Regional School Committee member (2) for three years 



41 



and also the following questions: 

(1) "Shall the Town of Lincoln be allowed to assess an additional 
$310,000.00 in real estate and personal property taxes for the 
purposes of funding the Town's operating expenses for the 
fiscal year beginning July first, nineteen hundred 
ninety-three?" 

(2) "Shall the Town of Lincoln be allowed to exempt from the 
provisions of Proposition two and one-half, so called, the 
amounts required to pay for the bond issued in order to design 
and carry out necessary renovations to the Town of Lincoln's 
public school buildings?" 



ARTICLE 2. To bring in their votes for any Committees, 

Commissioners, Trustees, and other officers required by 
law to be elected by ballot or otherwise. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 3. To hear and act upon the reports of the Town 

Officers, Committees, Commissioners and Trustees. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 4. To fix the salaries and compensation of the several 

elective officers of the Town and to determine whether any 
Department, Board or Committee shall be authorized to employ for 
additional compensation any of its members and to fix additional 
compensation of such members. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 5. To raise and appropriate money for the necessary and 

expedient purposes of the Town, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Finance Committee 



kl 



ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money, in addition to that authorized under 
Article 5 of this Warrant, to provide general pay increases for 
employees as may be granted by the Selectmen and/or the Library 
Trustees, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen, Library Trustees 



ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will authorize the Board of Selectmen 

and the School Committee to continue the Town's annual 
contract with the Secretary of Defense to operate the elementary 
school at Hanscom Air Force Base, Bedford, Massachusetts, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

School Committee, Selectmen 



ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof so that the School 
Building Committee can design and carry out necessary renovations to 
the Town of Lincoln's public school buildings, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

School Building Committee 



ARTICLE 9 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof, to be used by the 
public safety departments for the purchase of vehicles and/ or 
equipment, and to see if the Town will authorize the disposal by sale 
or otherwise of excess vehicles and equipment, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money 

by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by 
borrowing or any combination thereof to be used for the construction, 
reconstruction, and/or maintenance and repair of the Town's roads, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



43 



ARTICLE 11. To see If the Town will vote to raise and apropriate 
sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof for the repair and 
maintenance of certain Town buildings, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof, to be used by various 
departments for the purchase of vehicles and/or equipment, and to see 
if the Town will authorize the disposal by sale or otherwise of excess 
vehicles and equipment, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof for the environmental 
study and analysis of the site at the Town's Department of Public 
Works facility and for the development of a plan for remediation of 
any contamination, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof in order to supplement 
$20,000 previously appropriated from Free Cash for the purpose of 
conducting a study of structural integrity, heating and electrical 
systems, space utilization and similar aspects of the Town's Public 
Safety Building, said appropriation to be used to cover the increased 
costs of undertaking the aforementioned study, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 15. Be it resolved that the Town of Lincoln vote to authorize 
the Selectmen to provide a mechanism to review the Town's 
system of government and report back to a future Town Meeting. 

Selectmen 



44 



ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of 

money from Free Cash to tne Fiscal Year 1993 Department 
of Public Works budget, line item 306, entitled Transfer Station, for 
the purpose of replacing amounts previously disbursed from said 
budget, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of 

money from Free Cash to the Fiscal Year 1993 Reserve Fund 
for the purpose of replacing amounts previously disbursed from said 
fund, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof, said monies to be used 
for the purchase of equipment for the Lincoln Schools to enhance the 
education of students, or take any other action relative thereto. 

School Committee 



ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof for the purpose of 
undertaking necessary remodeling and/or repairs to the Town's school 
buildings in order to improve access to handicapped persons, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

School Committee 



ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a gift certain 

structures and equipment to be installed and located on 
the site behind Town Offices owned by the Town and to be designated as 
a Town baseball field, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



45 



ARTICLE 21. To see If the Town will authorize the Tax Equity Study 
Committee to continue its study of alternate methods of 
levying the property tax and to report to the Town its findings and 
recommendations, or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Tax Study Equity Committee 



ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to adopt a maximum 

qualifying gross receipts amount which is higher than the 
standard statutory maximum of $20,000 (but not greater than the 
permitted statutory maximum of $40,000), for the purposes of the 
property tax exemptions and deferral provisions of G.L. Ch.59, Section 
5, Clause 41A, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Assessors 



ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will appropriate a sum of money to 

provide technical assistance to the Board of Selectmen in 
order to assist in the preparation of a Generic Environmental Impact 
Report on Hanscom Field; determine whether the money shall be provided 
by the tax levy or by transfer from available funds, or by any 
combination of these methods; or act in any other manner in relation 
thereto. 

By Petition 



ARTICLE 24. Whereas, research on the Title X school-based clinics 

nationwide shows a dramatic increase in pregnancies, 
sexually transmitted diseases, and number of sexually active teens 
when contraceptives were dispensed or counseled on school sites, and 

Whereas, research also shows the condom to have an 
unacceptably high failure rate, ten (10) to twenty (20) per cent, and 

Whereas, public health officials have stated that finding 
an uninfected life-long monogamous partner is of greater risk 
reduction than wearing condoms with infected partners, and, 

Whereas, Massachusetts General Law, Chapter 71, section 
30, requires that schools uphold high moral principles including the 
teaching of chastity; be it resolved that the town of Lincoln vote to 
pass a resolution that Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School 
discontinue condom availability on the campus, and develop instruction 
that will accurately promote safe sex by teaching students the skills 
necessary to postpone or discontinue sexual involvement and to 
understand such issues as character evaluation, developing sound 
relationships, self-empowerment, and setting personal goals, or act on 
anything relative thereto. 

By Petition 



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ARTICLE 25. Be it resolved that the town of Lincoln vote to pass a 

resolution that the regional high school faculty, outside 
advisors, counselors, or guest speakers not actively teach or promote 
through the use of classroom materials student romantic same-sex 
relationships or encourage the same via counseling or by referral to 
gay, lesbian or bisexual individuals or organizations. Be it further 
resolved that no teacher, counselor, advisor, or speaker label or 
identify students as having other than heterosexual orientation, or 
counsel students extensively in areas of sexual orientation, clinical 
depression, or suicidal thoughts without written prior consent of a 
parent or guardian; or act on anything relative thereto. 

By Petition 



ARTICLE 26. Be it resolved that the town of Lincoln will vote to pass 

a resolution that, since sexual activity outside a 
faithful monogamous relationship involves multiple risks with or 
without a condom, the regional high school will install a policy that 
prohibits the use of graphic sexual teaching materials or descriptions 
of explicit sexual behaviors in any classroom; assembly, or by any 
counselor or guest speaker on campus. Furthermore, be it resolved 
that no student be instructed to be, assumed to be for instructional 
purposes, or otherwise encouraged to be sexually active during the 
high school years, unless legally married; or that the town will act 
on anything relative thereto. 



By Petition 



47 



Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with your doings, 
thereon to the Town Clerk, at or before the time for the meeting 
aforesaid. Given under our hands this twenty-second day of February 
in the year of our Lord one-thousand nine-hundred ninety-three. 



Robert L. DeNormandie 



Harriet B. Todd 



Katherine S. McHugh, Chairman 



SELECTMEN OF LINCOLN 



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